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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 28 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Why I don't distro-hop: Because work. And pain. Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 6:49am
Story Meet Sascha Meinrath - Akademy Keynote Speaker Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 6:41am
Story Is Open Source Becoming the De Facto Standard in the Data Center? Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 6:30am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 12:23am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 12:22am
Story Video: Which Super Hero Would the Linux Community Be? Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 12:09am
Story Cheapo Firefox OS mobes to debut in India – definitely not one for selfie-conscious users Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 12:03am
Story Red Hat: ARM servers will come when people crank out chips like AMD's 64-bit Seattle Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 12:01am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2014 - 9:57am
Story Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2014 - 7:34am

Red Hat and Fedora are Poles Apart

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: While Fedora is too bleeding edge, Red Hat (and Centos) is too conservative. They are poles apart and don't offer anything in between.

“We’re Linux” Videos: Placing Freedom Before Practicality?

Filed under
Linux

workswithu.com: The Linux Foundation recently announced the winner and runners up of the “We’re Linux” video contest that it sponsored as a response to the well-known promotional campaigns by Microsoft and Apple. The selections are professional and inspiring, but I worry that their focus on “freedom” limits their effectiveness. Here’s why.

Abiword is Awesome

Filed under
Software

omegamormegil.wordpress: Abiword has just become my new favorite word processor. It’s always been nice for being so quick and low on resources, but the 2.6 release of Abiword has added two new features which have pushed it over the top for me.

Why I Use Linux

Filed under
Linux

pcworld.com: I am not a programmer. Yet Linux is built on the philosophical principle of freely sharing source code. This is how those who create Linux frequently advocate it. But if I'm not a programmer, and source code therefore means little to me, why do I use Linux?

Open source VS proprietary support

Filed under
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: One of the biggest arguments people try to use against Open source programs is the supposed lack of support. In general I have found that support for open source programs is equal to and ofttimes better than that provided by proprietary companies.

The offensive Microsoft anti-Linux netbook offensive

Filed under
Microsoft

itwire.com: Ever since the unexpected advent of netbooks Microsoft has been working to push Linux out. Microsoft have reminded us they’re a proprietary company with the offensive Windows 7 Starter Edition being limited to three apps only. Are they trying to insult us or what?

Also: Will Microsoft blow its netbook lead with Windows 7 crippleware?

CentOS 5.3 Has Keen Focus on Virtualization

Filed under
Linux

eweek.com: CentOS is based on Red Hat's Enterprise Linux source packages and shares in Red Hat Enterprise Linux's recent virtualization, app dev, security and storage improvements. Many of the enhancements in CentOS 5.3 come in the area of virtualization, targeted largely at scalability on large host machines.

4 Minimal Linux Desktop Distributions

Filed under
Linux

productivelinux.com: I’ve been researching concepts of minimalism as it applies to computing and personal productivity, and I’m convinced that in many cases, a minimal setup can really help you get more done.

How To Upgrade From Ext3 To Ext4 Without Formatting

Filed under
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: I did mention that the new filesystem - ext4 is stable, fast and backward compatible with ext2 and ext3. Today, we will look at how you can upgrade your existing ext3 filesystem to ext4 without reformating your hard disk.

Aaron Seigo Talks About KDE's Past and Future

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

itmanagement.earthweb: Aaron Seigo is one of the most public faces of the KDE desktop. Not only is he a long-time developer, but, for the past three years, he has been president of KDE e.V.. Now nearing the end of his time as president, he talked about KDE's recent past and near future, and his role in both.

Red Hat maps open source activity. France is #1

Filed under
OSS

blog.internetnews.com: Red Hat today published a new study together with Georgia Tech mapping open source activity across 75 countries. Officially called the Open Source Index (OSI), the final score is made of a number of factors including policies, practices in the Government, Industry, and Community.

Does Debian still matter?

Filed under
Linux

pcauthority.com.au/Blog: Debian was one of the first Linux distributions, and it pioneered much of what we take for granted in Linux systems today. But has Debian had its day?

Is Debian dying?

Filed under
Linux

debaira.blogspot: Debian is certainly the first, large-scale (>1400 developers), global, volunteer created and driven, engineering project whose ambitious concern is nothing less than meeting the needs of all of its users with incisive design effectiveness for an easy to install, general purpose operating system.

Neuros Link: Tuning In HDTV, Using Ubuntu

workswithu.com: I recently came across an Ubuntu-based device that is designed for viewing streaming and local video content on an HDTV. The device in question is the Neuros Link.

10 reasons you should give Ubuntu a try

Filed under
Ubuntu

2indya.com: Here are some of the glaring reasons that would make you pick up a Ubuntu CD and give it a try while keeping your earlier operating system intact.

Lenovo Analyst: Linux on Netbooks Is Doomed

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Because it's only proper to give credit where it's due, Matt Kohut, Worldwide Competitive Analyst for Lenovo, could be spot on in his prediction that Linux will remain a niche market on netbooks.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 68

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #68 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Call for Participations: openSUSE Summit 2009, openSUSE at LinuxFest Northwest, and People of openSUSE: Jean-Daniel Dodin

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Network equipment provider deploys MontaVista Linux

  • Awful Nautilus / Brasero bug in Jaunty RC1
  • Stephen Hawking rushed to hospital
  • Stereotypes
  • For those that want bleeding edge without blood
  • Here comes Ubuntu 9.04
  • Microsoft could be a winner in Sun-Oracle deal
  • IBM Isn't Too Worried About Oracle
  • Big iron: The ultimate cloud platform?
  • Amazon MP3 on Ubuntu
  • Thoughts about Linux marketing #1 : Linux and Netbooks
  • Fitting the kitchen sink onto a CD
  • Ubuntu New Wave skin for Opera

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • RedHat / CentOS Install and Configure Cacti Network Graphing Tool

  • Linux Migration for the Home PC User, Part 5
  • Stream YouTube videos directly to your media player
  • Creating A Custom Slide Show Screensaver
  • Why does Firefox start in offline mode?
  • Removing Internet Junks using privoxy
  • Send email with attachment from linux command line using UUENCODE
  • Install OpenVZ on CentOS to create a virtual container
  • PyMOTW: multiprocessing, part 1
  • Play Guild Wars on Ubuntu 9.04
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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Tizen and Android

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Making your OpenStack monitoring stack highly available using Open Source tools
    Operators tasked with maintaining production environments are relying on monitoring stacks to provide insight to resource usage and a heads-up to threats of downtime. Perhaps the most critical function of a monitoring stack is providing alerts which trigger mitigation steps to ensure an environment stays up and running. Downtime of services can be business-critical, and often has extremely high cost ramifications. Operators working in cloud environments are especially reliant on monitoring stacks due to the increase in potential inefficiency and downtime that comes with greater resource usage. The constant visibility of resources and alerts that a monitoring stack provides, makes it a fundamental component of any cloud.
  • InfraRed: Deploying and Testing Openstack just made easier!
  • The journey of a new OpenStack service in RDO
    When new contributors join RDO, they ask for recommendations about how to add new services and help RDO users to adopt it. This post is not a official policy document nor a detailed description about how to carry out some activities, but provides some high level recommendations to newcomers based on what I have learned and observed in the last year working in RDO.
  • Getting to know the essential OpenStack components better
  • Getting to know core components, speed mentoring, and more OpenStack news
  • Testing LibreOffice 5.3 Notebookbar
    I teach an online CSCI class about usability. The course is "The Usability of Open Source Software" and provides a background on free software and open source software, and uses that as a basis to teach usability. The rest of the class is a pretty standard CSCI usability class. We explore a few interesting cases in open source software as part of our discussion. And using open source software makes it really easy for the students to pick a program to study for their usability test final project.
  • [Older] Drupal member sent out after BDSM lifestyle revealed

    Drupal, like many other open source projects, has a stated goal of welcoming and accepting all people, no matter their heritage, culture, sexual orientation, gender identity or other factors.

  • Controversy Erupts in Open-Source Community After Developer's Sex Life Made Public
    Drupal is a popular open-source content-management system, used to build websites. Like many other open-source projects, Drupal is guided by several committees that are supposed to be accountable to the community and its code of conduct, which enshrines values like "be considerate" and "be respectful." Also like many other open-source projects, Drupal attracts all sorts of people, some of whom are eclectic. Last week, under murky circumstances, Drupal creator Dries Buytaert banned one of the project's technical and community leaders, Larry Garfield. Buytaert attributed the decision to aspects of Garfield's private sex life. Many Drupal users and developers are up in arms about the perceived injustice of the move, exacerbated by what they see as a lack of transparency.
  • HospitalRun: Open Source Software for the Developing World
    When open source software is used for global health and global relief work, its benefits shine bright. The benefits of open source become very clear when human health and human lives are on the line. In this YouTube video, hear Harrisburg, Pennsylvania software developer Joel Worrall explain about HospitalRun software – open source cloud-based software used at developing world healthcare facilities.
  • Scotland emphasises sharing and reuse of ICT
    Scotland’s public administrations should focus on common, shared technology platforms, according to the new digital strategy, published on 22 March. The government says it wants to develop “shared infrastructure, services and standards in collaboration with our public sector partners, to reduce costs and enable resources to be focused on front-line services.”
  • [Older] OpenSSL Re-licensing to Apache License v. 2.0 To Encourage Broader Use with Other FOSS Projects and Products

    OpenSSL Launches New Website to Organize Process, Seeks to Contact All Contributors

  • Austria state secretary promotes open data
    The State Secretary at Austria’s Federal Chancellery, Muna Duzdar, is encouraging the making available of government data as open data. “The administration must set an example and support the open data culture by giving society its data back”, the State Secretary for Digitalisation said in a statement.
  • Study: Hungary should redouble open data initiatives
    The government of Hungary should redouble its efforts to make public sector information available as open data, and actively help to create market opportunities, a government white paper recommends. The ‘White Paper on National Data Policy’ was approved by the government in December.
  • Williamson School Board OKs developing open source science curriculum
    Science textbooks may be a thing of the past in Williamson County Schools. The Williamson County school board approved a proposal Monday night to use open source science resources instead of science textbooks. The switch will require a team of nine teachers to spend a year developing an open source curriculum.
  • How Elsevier plans to sabotage Open Access
    It was a long and difficult road to get the major publishing houses to open up to open access, but in the end the Dutch universities got their much awaited ‘gold deal’ for open access. A recently revealed contract between Elsevier and the Dutch research institutes lays bare the retardant tactics the publishing giant employs to stifle the growth of open access.
  • #0: Introducing R^4
  • RcppTOML 0.1.2

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday
  • FedEx Will Pay You $5 to Install Flash on Your Machine
    FedEx is making you an offer you can’t afford to accept. It’s offering to give you $5 (actually, it’s a discount on orders over $30) if you’ll just install Adobe Flash on your machine. Nobody who knows anything about online security uses Flash anymore, except when it’s absolutely necessary. Why? Because Flash is the poster child for the “security-vulnerability-of-the-hour” club — a group that includes another Adobe product, Acrobat. How unsafe is Flash? Let’s put it this way: seven years ago, Steve Jobs announced that Flash was to be forever banned from Apple’s mobile products. One of the reasons he cited was a report from Symantec that “highlighted Flash for having one of the worst security records in 2009.” Flash security hasn’t gotten any better since.
  • Every once in a while someone suggests to me that curl and libcurl would do better if rewritten in a “safe language”
  • An insecure dishwasher has entered the IoT war against humanity

    Regel says that he has contacted Miele on a number of occasions about the issue, but had failed to get a response to his missives, and this has no updated information on the vulnerability.

    He added, bleakly that "we are not aware of an actual fix."

  • Monday Witness: It's Time to Reconize a Civil Right Not to be Connected
    Along with death and taxes, two things appear inevitable. The first is that Internet of Things devices will not only be built into everything we can imagine, but into everything we can't as well. The second is that IoT devices will have wholly inadequate security, if they have any security at all. Even with strong defenses, there is the likelihood that governmental agencies will gain covert access to IoT devices anyway. What this says to me is that we need a law that guarantees consumers the right to buy versions of products that are not wirelessly enabled at all.
  • Remember kids, if you're going to disclose, disclose responsibly!
    If you pay any attention to the security universe, you're aware that Tavis Ormandy is basically on fire right now with his security research. He found the Cloudflare data leak issue a few weeks back, and is currently going to town on LastPass. The LastPass crew seems to be dealing with this pretty well, I'm not seeing a lot of complaining, mostly just info and fixes which is the right way to do these things.