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Sunday, 26 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Group test: note takers

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Paper - don't you just hate it? We live in the 'information age', and yet the much promised era of the paperless office still seems decades away. But there has to be a more elegant solution...

Toshiba Bringing Netbook To U.S. Market

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

crn.com: Toshiba plans to enter the increasingly crowded U.S. netbook market later this year, Channelweb.com has learned.

andLinux - Run Linux natively inside Windows

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: This is a most wicked idea: to be able to run Linux applications on top of your Windows desktop, without bothering with partitioning, dual-boot configurations and other stuff normally involved in running multiple operating systems!

PCLinuxOS 2009.1 Final Officially Released

Filed under
PCLOS

pclinuxos.com: The Ripper Gang is pleased to announce the final public ISO release of PCLinuxOS 2009.1. This release features kernel 2.6.26.8.tex3, KDE 3.5.10, Open Office 3.0, Firefox 3.0.7, Thunderbird 2.0.0.14, Ktorrent, Frostwire, Amarok, Flash, Java JRE, Compiz-Fusion 3D and much more.

Linux: Save The Earth, Save A Buck?

Filed under
Linux

bmighty.com: Some IT users "go green" to save the planet. Others do it to save money. Either way, Linux has a lot to offer any green-minded small business.

Why I Love Linux and FOSS

Filed under
OSS

linuxtoday.com/blog: FOSS is all about giving power and control to individuals. It embraces all of the important freedoms-- the freedom to create, share, invent, collaborate, learn, and change, all without penalties or artificial barriers.

Critical Mass

Filed under
Linux

danlynch.org: Dvorak has never had much love for Linux and he’s been very derogatory in the past. He seems to love the latest Ubuntu. The two words that really stuck out to me in the article though were “critical mass”.

After two years, a new PCLinuxOS ships

Filed under
PCLOS

desktoplinux.com: Two years after its last major release, the interesting PCLinuxOS project has quietly posted a major new release.

First encounters of the SimplyMepis kind

Filed under
Linux

ldjackson.net: It’s funny that my first encounter with SimplyMepis came as sort of an accident. I have been reading Preacherpen’s articles about Mepis and had actually downloaded the new SimplyMepis 8. Since I already had the CD of Mepis 8, I decided to see what it would do on the old laptop.

Google and the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: My compadre, David Coursey, doubts that Google will actually be partnering with any hardware vendor to deliver Google Android to users as a desktop Linux. Actually, David, I'm sticking with that prediction.

European open-source policy paper reflects Microsoft influence

Filed under
OSS

news.cnet.com: It's fascinating to see governments around the world embrace open source as a way to boost local economies and improve sovereignty. It's even better when the policy process itself is laid bare, allowing outsiders to see the partisan meddling that goes into a publicly articulated policy.

Possible data loss in Ext4

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: A bug report posted in the bug tracker for the next version of Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope) describes a massive data loss problem when using Ext4, the future standard file system for Linux.

An Interview With The Developers Of FFmpeg

Filed under
Software
Interviews

phoronix.com: Earlier this week the FFmpeg project reached version 0.5, which was quite significant considering no new FFmpeg release was made available in years. This release contained a plethora of new encoders and decoders, support for VDPAU, a variety of bug-fixes, and many other improvements. What is next for FFmpeg?

Massive updates in slackware-current

Filed under
Slack

slackbook.org/blog: Today, Pat Volkerding published a massive amount of package updates to the slackware-current tree. Some of the absolute highlights mentioned in the ChangeLog are indication of a big step forward for Slackware, and most importantly: KDE 3.5.10 is gone, replaced by KDE 4.2.1.

Designing a Linux PAM login security application

Filed under
Linux

Learn 10 steps to designing a simple PAM security login app for Linux

Etymology of an Open Source App/Project

Filed under
Software

hehe2.net: The natural extension of the “Etymology of a Distro” blog would be delving deeper into Open Source project’s etymologies. Indeed many readers already suggested that. Here are 20 Open Source applications and the interesting (and not so interesting) stories behind their names:

Review: Zenwalk 6.0, A Sprint And A Stumble

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: THE first real connection I made at an emotional level with a Linux distribution was with Zenwalk, back in its version 2.0 days, and it was that connection which persuaded me to make my first (modest) cash donation to an Open Source project.

Desktop GUI - Quick Clarification

Filed under
Software

wolf911.us: I run across people that get confused as to what a GUI is. Of course a GUI stands for Graphical User Interface and can be applied several ways and methods, but I want to focus on 3 things for this post.

Red Hat: Cloud won't drive open-source adoption

Filed under
Linux

news.zdnet.com: Open standards and the need for interoperability on the cloud will not necessarily drive the adoption of open-source software, said a Red Hat executive.

PCLinuxOS 2009 Is Released?

Filed under
PCLOS

pclinuxosuser.blogspot: Although for some reasons, there has been no announcement so far as I know, PCLinuxOS 2009 had been released. I guess it's time for first impressions.

Also: PCLinuxOS 2009.1 is Released Today!

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More in Tux Machines

Manjaro-Arm is Shutting Down

It is with deep regret that we are announcing that the Manjaro-Arm team is shutting down. I started this project a little over a year ago with no intent to become the sole maintainer. Read more

KDE and Qt

  • The Novelty of KDE Neon
    The good folks at KDE managed to engage a market of Linux desktop users underserved by other distribution models. Or, maybe it’s just me. KDE has a long history in the desktop ecosystem. It was the first Linux desktop I was exposed to back in 2006. Back then, it was on OpenSUSE and it was clean and functional. For some reason after that, installing KDE had never really appealed to me. I’ve tested it out briefly when poking around at what the OpenSUSE guys were doing and I’ve run Kubuntu for brief snippets. For years, I’ve been trying to find out what type of desktop user I am and which distro fits my needs.
  • Tracking KDE Frameworks and Qt
    The KDE-FreeBSD team bumped Qt to 5.7.1 and KDE Frameworks to 5.31.0 in official ports last week, so we’re fairly up-to-date in that department. On FreeBSD, we still fully support Qt4 next to Qt5, so some of the delay in getting this stuff in is due to some shuffling of install locations. In particular, we’ve added qt-chooser in this round of updates, so that qmake is qmake — and no longer qmake-qt4 or some other suffixed binary. We use qt-chooser to switch out one or the other. Checking that this doesn’t break anything else — or at least making sure that everything still compiles — is what took the most time this round of updates.
  • Simple Menu Launcher for KDE Plasma 5.9
    Following "United" theme, there is also "Simple Menu" launcher for KDE Plasma 5.9. It's minimal, a smaller form of full screen menu; it's also clean, showing all applications at once. Honestly, it's UI is similar to Pantheon Menu in elementary OS but including categories. If you like horizontal-oriented menu, Simple Menu is suitable for you. It's available to install from KDE Store. Thanks to Sho for creating Simple Menu.
  • A Simple KDE Twitter Plasmoid
    This KDE Twitter Plasmoids offers a simpler alternative to a desktop Linux twitter app like Choqok. See tweets, send tweets, and check mentions.
  • Telegram desktop client for flatpak #2
    Some time ago I posted a blog post about how I packed telegram desktop client for flatpak. I’ve been updating it since then in some reasonable intervals as I don’t have time to update it more often and mostly because the telegram client’s build system breaks my build quite oftenly. Recently I discovered that someone managed to patch telegram to use system Qt libraries instead of building own patched Qt and building linking it statically. After some time I managed to adjust those patches and make them work with my build which allows me to use Qt from KDE runtimes. Here are new instructions how to get this work:
  • Building the latest greatest for Android AArch64 (with Vulkan teaser)
    Let’s say you got a 64-bit ARM device running Android. For instance, the Tegra X1-based NVIDIA Shield TV. Now, let’s say you are also interested in the latest greatest content from the dev branch, for example to try out some upcoming Vulkan enablers from here and here, and want to see all this running on the big screen with Android TV. How do we get Qt, or at least the basic modules like QtGui, QtQuick, etc. up and running on there?
  • Qt Quick WebGL Streaming
    WebGL Streaming is optimized for Qt Quick and allows you to run remote Qt Quick applications in a browser.

SUSE Leftovers

  • OBS got the power!
    Old build workers, rack mounted Old build workers, rack mounted One year after introducing a new kind of Open Build Service worker machines, the “lambkins”, the openSUSE Build Service got a big hardware refresh. The new machines, sponsored by SUSE, are equipped with: 2,8GHz AMD Opteron Processors (6348) 256 GB RAM one 120 GB SSD Four of them are located in a chassis with a height of 2 units and run 12-16 workers on them (virtual machines, that are building packages). That new build power allowed us to remove some of old machines from the pool. The unified hardware makes the management of the machines a lot easier now, even if there are still the most powerful old machines left.
  • openSUSE Heroes December meeting – final results
    While we had some fun and good food and drinks, we also managed to discuss a lot during the three days in the Nuremberg headquarter. This was needed because this was the first time that the Heroes came together in their current form. In the end, we managed to do no coding and even (nearly) no administration – but instead we started to discuss our (internal and external) policies and work flows – and did some decisions regarding the next steps and the future of the openSUSE infrastructure.
  • New and improved Inqlude web site
    During last year's Summer of Code I had the honor of mentoring Nanduni Indeewaree Nimalsiri. She worked on Inqlude, the comprehensive archive of third party Qt libraries, improving the tooling to create a better structured web site with additional features such as categorization by topic. She did an excellent job with it and all of her code ended up on the master branch. But we hadn't yet made the switch to change the default layout of the web site to fully take advantage of all her work. As part of SUSE's 15th Hack Week, which is taking place this week, I took some time to change that, put up some finishing touches, and switch the Inqlude web site to the new layout. So here we are. I proudly present the new improved home page of Inqlude.

Benchmarks Of Ubuntu 17.04 Beta vs. Antergos, Clear Linux, openSUSE Tumbleweed

For those curious how Ubuntu 17.04 is shaping up, considering this week was the "beta" release for participating flavors, I decided to take a fresh Ubuntu 17.04 x86_64 daily ISO and see how its performance compares to Ubuntu 17.10, Clear Linux 13600, Antergos 17.2, and openSUSE Tumbleweed. Read more