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Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android-x86 4.4 review – first Release Candidate Rianne Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 6:56pm
Story Open source alternatives for small businesses Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 5:01pm
Story Open source startups: Don't try to be Red Hat Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 4:59pm
Story IBM Power Development Platform Emphasizes Linux ISVs Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 4:54pm
Story Chrome OS and Android may be top desktop Linux distros in 2014 Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 4:50pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 3:01pm
Story CyanogenMOD developer demos Android Mirroring to Chromecast Rianne Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 7:53am
Story Android Smartphone shipment crosses 800 million Rianne Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 7:35am
Story KDE Frameworks 5 enters Alpha stage Rianne Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 7:05am
Story This Weekend in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2014 - 7:53pm

Linux On a Nutshell

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Linux You have five minutes and ten sentences to explain Linux to a complete newbie, without the geekery mumbo jumbo. What would you say? Here is my take:

A Gloomy Vista for Microsoft

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Microsoft Last year I was meeting with the CEO of a PC company who offered to give me a demo of his company's gorgeous new top-of- the-line notebook loaded with Windows Vista. He flipped open the laptop, pressed the power button, and … nothing. We waited. And waited. It was excruciating.

Is Sun Solaris on its deathbed?

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OS Linux is enjoying growth, with a contingent of devotees too large to be called a cult following at this point. Solaris, meanwhile, has thrived as a longstanding, primary Unix platform geared to enterprises. But with Linux the object of all the buzz in the industry, can Sun's rival Solaris Unix OS hang on, or is it destined to be displaced by Linux altogether?

A Distribution, an Audience, and the Passage of Time

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Gentoo Gentoo Linux has had a rough time of it the last few years. Matt Asay at CNET suspects Ubuntu's rising star is responsible. Having used both distributions extensively, and strongly preferring one, I agree with Asay. However, an average Gentoo user is usually not asking the same from his machine as a typical Ubuntu user.

Linux is not always right

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Linux Debian along with most Linux distributions are based on free and open source software (FOSS). Debian specifically is a front runner in the freedom game. FOSS is great, I love it. As much as I love FOSS I value my freedom of choice in what I do on my computer and in my daily life much more than free software.

Open Source Bloggers Don't Let the Facts Confuse Them

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OSS The open source blogosphere is up in arms again with its typical “don’t-let-the-facts-get-in-the-way” postings against Microsoft (MSFT). This time Microsoft’s co-conspirators are the Stanford and Harvard business schools because two of their professors did a “study (of) how a commercial firm competes with a free open source product.

Bloatware in a FOSS world

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OSS Bloatware: the state of a program in which the software becomes so large, inefficient and cumbersome that it's more of a pain to use than a joy. And despite all that people in the FOSS community claim about open source software, FOSS bloatware is a comin', and there's nothing you can do about it. Or is there?

Mini-Notebook Mania, Part 1

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Hardware These ultra-compact portables have become hot sellers since Asus introduced its first Eee PC last fall. How do these new ultra-compact laptops differ from traditional models?

Cool stats about Debian bugs

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Linux Now that bug #500000 has been reported, let’s have a look at all our other bugs, using UDD.

Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth named as IT Community Hero of the Year

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Ubuntu (PR): CNET Networks UK today announced the winners of the sixth annual UK Business Technology Awards. In one of the most prestigious events in the IT calendar, the finalists were honoured last night at an elite networking dinner, held in London's famous Park Lane Hilton.

Open Source UK's £80m competition

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OSS THE UK government published its list of 12 approved suppliers of software to schools this afternoon and it did not include Novell. Becta, the education quango that appointed the list, had told them it was looking for firms that could supply both straight and Open Source software.

Linux Foundation personal membership is limited

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Linux The Linux Foundation has announced a personal membership scheme, allowing community members to join the foundation for $49 and receive a T-shirt and a quarterly newsletter, but the membership privileges are limited.

today's leftovers

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  • Track your missing laptop with Adeona

  • on openSUSE handling of hardware changes
  • Keir Thomas on Ubuntu Kung Fu
  • Astrophysicists Rely on Linux to Crunch Data
  • DIRECTV Scores Points in the Linux Community
  • Cinepaint with GTK+2 Widgets on Gentoo…
  • Sun: OpenSolaris 'pretty freaking amazing'
  • The Open Source Contributions of Six Blind Men and an Elephant
  • One more reason for One Laptop Per Child (OLPC)
  • Dell Mini Inspiron 9
  • More Git Madness
  • VDI: Very Disappointed Indeed
  • IBM's New "I.T.Standards Policy" - and a Call for Wider Reform
  • Using LinuxDefender Live To Rescue Your Windows NTFS Drive
  • Will the KDE4 upstream translations be there early enough for Intrepid?
  • Linux: Changing UIDs and GIDs for a user
  • Interview with Johan Thelin (Qt for Embedded Linux)
  • You cannot beat open source
  • How to control the MD5 sum of an ISO image under Windows and under Linux
  • No More Purple Ponies
  • Roll custom social networking sites with Elgg 1.0
  • URGENT NOTIFICATION: major bug in all Mandriva Linux 2009 pre-releases
  • Some Surprises in Novell's Foray Into NAC
  • Linux Plumbers Conference 2008 Keynote Video

Linux does not "need its own Steve Jobs"

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Linux In a break today I found yet another article outlining why "Linux needs its own Steve Jobs for it to be good". We get those quite a lot it's kinda the Top10 list of people with half a brain. Well, here's the final discussion why that idea is wrong (and retarded), so people can stop writing the same article that was wrong back in 1999:

gentoo’s growth

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Gentoo DistroWatch has yet another “the sky is falling” post about Gentoo, and, going against habit, I’m going to comment on the situation in general.

X.Org 7.4 Finally Released

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Software It's been a hell of a time getting X.Org 7.4 out the door, but this afternoon Adam Jackson has released this long-delayed update to this X system. X.Org 7.4 is arriving after the release of X Server 1.5.1 earlier in the day. Yes, it's finally here!

Also: X Server 1.5.1 Has Been Released
And: Ubuntu work

Firefox and 3.0.2 security updates now available

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Moz/FF As part of Mozilla Corporation’s ongoing stability and security update process, Firefox 3.0.2 and Firefox are now available for Windows, Mac, and Linux as free downloads.

Also: Lightning and Sunbird 0.9 released

Ubuntu 8.10 "Intrepid Ibex" (Alpha 6): first impressions

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Ubuntu In a continuing series of articles highlighting that GNU/Linux is a viable replacement operating system, today we're putting the newest release of the popular Ubuntu distribution through its paces.

Linux examined: Xandros Professional

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Linux To a lot of people, Ubuntu represents the most end-user-friendly nongeek-compatible Linux distribution. But there are other commercial distributions that work even harder to create a desktop experience that is, frankly, Windows-like. The two most well-known of these are Xandros and Linspire (formerly Lindows). Since Xandros recently acquired Linspire, that leaves it pretty much in sole possession of that segment of the marketplace.

10 Command-Line Applications I Use in Debian and Ubuntu

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Software In this article I'll briefly review ten of my favourite CLI (command-line interface), not necessarily the most popular or most powerful of them. So if you don't find your personal favourite, (e.g. Midnight Commander or mp3blaster), it's because the article includes the tools I use more often.

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KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.