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Wednesday, 20 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Technologies Holding Back the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Even after considering the success seen with Linux on netbooks, there is really no question that it feels like something ominous is holding back desktop Linux from the masses.

Some Things Linux Can Do, That Windows Won’t.

Filed under
Linux

ubuntulinuxhelp.com: I had an interesting chat with a friend today, part of which dealt with the differences between Windows and Linux (hence this post). In a nutshell, he was trying to grasp why I really preferred Linux.

What will Fedora 13 Linux be named?

Filed under
Linux

blog.internetnews.com: Among the bits of minutiae that I personally find entertaining about the Linux distribution release cycle is how different distros come up with their respective release names.

KDE 4.3.4 Released

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: KDE Community Ships Fourth Translation and Service Release of the 4.3 Free Desktop, Containing Numerous Bugfixes, Performance Improvements and Translation Updates

Organize your life with Osmo

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: Everyone needs a way to organize both their work and personal life, but not everyone needs the same solution. For something fast and lightweight that covers all the basics, Vincent Danen recommends Osmo.

Ubuntu 9.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 9.10
  • 14 XSplash Themes For Ubuntu Karmic Koala
  • Ubuntu 10.4 boot changing from using usplash to plymouth
  • Could Ubuntu get enterprises to finally embrace the cloud?
  • Nice collection of themes for Gnome and ubuntu Dec I

The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 8 (Helena)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Linux Mint 8 (Helena) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Linux Mint 8 is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 9.10 that has lots of packages in its repositories (like multimedia codecs, Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, Skype, Google Earth, etc.) that are relatively hard to install on other distributions; it therefore provides a user-friendly desktop experience even for Linux newbies.

An Open Source Tool for Every Task

Filed under
Software

schoollibraryjournal.com: For the last several years, I’ve organized sessions on open source software (OSS) at ed-tech conferences. But this year was markedly different, with an awareness of these tools among educators that I’d never seen.

Where to Find Linux Screencasts/Video Tutorials

Filed under
Linux
Web

stephencuyos.com: The importance of video in learning Linux cannot be overemphasized. For most people, the best way to learn is to watch someone do it first. The video tutorials and screencasts offered in the following sites cover a wide range of Linux systems and applications.

Why the CrunchPad mattered

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

crunchgear.com: The CrunchPad was a testament to the power of online media and a fascinating study in the ability of new media to enact real changes on the real world. While the product faltered, it’s fascinating that the project went as far as it did given the forces arrayed against it.

FreeBSD bug gives untrusted root access

Filed under
Security
BSD

theregister.co.uk: A security bug in the latest version of the FreeBSD can be exploited to grant unprivileged users complete control over the operating system, a German researcher said Monday.

Five Years of Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

packtpub.com: Recently Ubuntu celebrated it's five-year anniversary. Ubuntu 9.10 "Karmic Koala" marks five years since the initial release, 4.10 "Warty Warthog". This article by Christer Edwards outlines some of the things Ubuntu has brought to the Linux world, and what a major impact it has had.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Fun with SUSE Studio
  • Mozilla Sea Monkey
  • Hosted Version of the Drupal CMS is Taking Shape
  • What's new with Acquia?
  • Beagle Search Tool Fetches Data From Deep Inside Your Linux System
  • Red Hat To Support Meals On Wheels This Holiday Season
  • Explosive Netbook Growth Expected to Slow
  • On KDE notifications
  • Google chart shows which netbooks run Chrome OS best
  • Open source: No vow of poverty (or get-rich-quick scheme)
  • Nokia plans just one Linux phone next year
  • Android And Chrome OS: Google Vs. Google?
  • DE: Open source professorship at University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
  • Linux PDF viewers

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Convert smbpasswd to tdbsam on Samba
  • SFTP on Ubuntu and Debian in 9 easy steps
  • “bash: ./configure: /bin/sh: bad interpreter: Permission denied”
  • How to Take Perfect Screenshots with KSnapshot
  • How to Establish Simple Remote Desktop Access Between Ubuntu and Windows
  • Regain Compiz desktop rotation with the mouse in Ubuntu 9.10
  • Sharing the Same Files Between Two PC’s
  • How to DHCP server on Ubuntu
  • OOo: How to do a holiday letter using mail merge, and print labels for the envelopes
  • Linux Security with Fail2Ban
  • fix bricked xos automatically
  • Have your Arch Linux always ready for an upgrade
  • Tomdroid with Ubuntu One syncing goodness
  • How to Print Large Posters in Ubuntu / Debian Linux
  • Graphic styles in OpenOffice.org Draw and Impress

GNOME Community Announces Dates GUADEC 2010

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: The GNOME Foundation has announced its annual conference, GUADEC, will be held in The Hague, Netherlands, July 24-30, 2010.

My life with Linux: Day 5

Filed under
Linux

pcauthority.com.au: Stuart Turton spends the fifth day of his one week odyssey with Linux, gets his hands dirty with 'Gnome Do' and quickly realises his new found joy for Ubuntu. Has Stuart finally cracked Linux?

Death of FreeBSD contributor John Birrell

Filed under
BSD
Obits

freebsdnews.net: Craig Rodrigues writes that his friend and colleague John Birrell passed away.

"Now it's time to say goodbye, to all our fam i ly..."

Filed under
Linux
Web

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: I find myself becoming argumentative and generally frustrated trying to argue about nuances in Linux development and that is not what I want to come across as or be. So, I will be letting Polar Bears and Penguins go. I want to thank everyone who visited and was supportive of the things posted here.

Photo Compositing with The GIMP

Filed under
GIMP
HowTos

It is no longer about the Killer Application

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

linuxjournal.com: I have been thinking about the Open Source world more than I have in the past. And as I have been talking about it with people, I have been getting the standard responses you might expect. An email from my friend Karl, in response to an email I sent, seemed to sum it all up:

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More in Tux Machines

The Red Hat Way

  • Red Hat wants to make cold-shouldered OpenStack red hot
    At OpenStack Summit in Boston last May, some speculated that the event might be the last gasp for OpenStack — an open-source platform for cloud computing and infrastructure-as-service. Granted, OpenStack was one of the less hyped open-source projects of the past year. But renewed community and end-user interest is breathing fresh life into the platform, according to Rob Young (pictured), senior manager of virtualization product and strategy at Red Hat Inc. Telcos and others are adopting OpenStack “because of the simplification of what was once complex, but also in the cost savings that can be realized by managing your own cloud within a hybrid cloud environment,” Young said.
  • Improved multimedia support with Pipewire in Fedora 27
    Pipewire — a new project of underlying Linux infrastructure to handle multimedia better — has just been officially launched. The project’s main goal is to improve the handling of both audio and video. Additionally, Pipewire introduces a security model to allow easy interaction with multimedia devices from containerized and sandboxed applications, i.e. Flatpak apps.
  • Architecting the future with abstractions and metadata
    The modern data center is built on abstractions, with Docker, Kubernetes, and OpenShift leading the way.

Games: Racing Games, Steam, SteamWorld Dig 2, XCOM 2: War of the Chosen

Software: DNS Checkers, Alternatives to Adobe Software, Fake Hollywood Hacker Terminal and More

KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu Site, Marble Maps, Kube in Randa, and UX in GNOME

  • Call for design: Artful Banner for Kubuntu.org website
    Kubuntu 17.10 — code-named Artful Aardvark — will be released on October 19th, 2017. We need a new banner for the website, and invite artists and designers to submit designs to us based on the Plasma wallpaper and perhaps the mascot design.
  • Randa 2017 Report – Marble Maps
    Just came back home yesterday from Randa Meetings 2017. This year, even though my major motive for the sprint was to use Qt 5.8’s Qt Speech module instead of custom Java for text-to-speech during navigation, that could not be achieved because of a bug which made the routes not appear in the app in the first place. And this bug is reproducible both by using latest code, and old-enough code, and is even there in the prod app in the Google Play Store itself. So, although most of my time had gone in deep-diving on the issue, unfortunately I was not able to find the root-cause to it eventually. I will need to pick up on that in the coming weeks again when I get time, to get it fixed.
  • Kube in Randa
    I’ve spent the last few days with fellow KDE hackers in beautiful Randa in the Swiss Mountains. It’s an annual event that focuses on a specific topic every year, and this time accessibility was up, so Michael and me made our way up here to improve Kube in that direction (and to enjoy the scenic surroundings of course).
  • Usability testing for early-stage software prototypes
    In this article, Ciarrai Cunneen and I describe how to do a paper-based usability test, using an early redesign of the GNOME Settings app as an example. The updated Settings features in GNOME 3.26, released on September 13. When writing open source software, we often obsess about making our logic elegant and concise, coming up with clever ways to execute tasks and demonstrate ideas. But we sometimes forget a key fact: Software is not useful if it is not easy to use. To make sure our programs can be used by our intended audience, we need usability testing. Usability is basically asking the question, "Can people easily use this thing?" or "Can real people use the software to do real tasks in a reasonable amount of time?" Usability is crucial to the creative process of building anything user-based. If real people can't use our software, then all the hard work of creating it is pointless. [...] In early 2016, GNOME decided to make a major UI update to its Settings application. This visual refresh shifts from an icon-based menu to drop-down lists and adds important changes to several individual Settings panels. The GNOME design team wanted to test these early-stage design changes to see how easily real people could navigate the new GNOME Settings application. Previously, GNOME relied on traditional usability tests, where users explore the software's UI directly. But this wouldn't work, since the software updates hadn't been completed.