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Sunday, 28 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story European Greens RFC: ‘Transparency implies use of open source’ Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 9:57am
Story Top 3 open source alternatives to Google Analytics Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 9:42am
Story AN EARLY VIEW OF GTK+ 3.16 Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 8:21am
Story Linux Container Security Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 8:14am
Story openSUSE, ROSA, and Red Hat Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 7:50am
Story Avoiding systemd isn't hard Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 6:39am
Story 12 Must Have Android Apps Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 6:34am
Story Ubuntu 14.10 XMir System Compositor Benchmarks Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 6:25am
Story Up the revolution! The rise of Red Hat Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 6:21am
Story Most Popular Linux Desktop Environment: GNOME Shell Rianne Schestowitz 23/10/2014 - 6:17am

Fight Club: Windows 7 vs Mandriva 2009.1

Filed under
Microsoft
MDV

linuxforu.com: The war has begun. Quite literally. We laid our hands on the RC (release candidate) available for free on Microsoft’s website, and took it for a spin against Mandriva 2009.1 Spring. Who won? The results are most surprising!

Atari 7800 goes open source

Filed under
Gaming

programmerfish.com: Remember the Dig Dug or Centipede or Robotron? They used to be favorites when Atari’s 7800 series was still around. Now since the era of those consoles is over and a different world of interactive reality gaming has taken over, Atari has unofficially released source code of over 15 games for the coders and enthusiasts to admire.

Microsoft And Linux Hold Peace Tweets

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

techcrunch.com: Okay, it’s not exactly the Camp David Summit that took place in 2000 between the Israelis and the Palestinians, but sometimes the littlest gestures can go a long way.

Plasma in KDE 4.4

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: Each release of Plasma over the 18 months since its debut release has marked an impressive step forward in its evolution. We are planning on making 4.4, our second anniversary release coming in January 2010.

Linux for Anyone?

Filed under
Linux

fullmetalgerbil.com: Over the past couple of months or so I’ve mentioned how Slackware isn’t exactly beginner-prohibitive. I still believe that, and going even further I’ll say that basically anyone can run Linux using a good solid starter distribution like Ubuntu, Mint or Zenwalk (or any number of others actually, or even PCBSD).

Claws Mail: The unsung powerhouse email client

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: I have used so many email clients over the years. For the last few years my go-to email client has been Thunderbird. Lately, however, I have really been taken in by Claws Mail.

Can Linux do BitLocker better than Windows 7?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

betanews.com: Our subject today is full-disk encryption, that useful security tool that keeps data on your hard drive safe even if the drive itself is in peril. We'll compare the Windows approach to the problem with that of a leading Linux contender.

Why MIDs have yet to soar

raiden.net: One of the topics I've seen of late is that, according to general sales numbers, Netbooks soared and were a huge success, while Mobile Internet Devices (MID) more or less did an epic faceplant and a fail of monumental proportions.

Why do you Like Microsoft?

Filed under
Microsoft

doctormo.wordpress: I have no interest in dealing with Microsoft, no partnerships, no trust, no respect, their name is dirt to me and socially they are a pariah. Not because of some fundamentalism or because I have an unwarranted grudge; But because they do harm to my communities.

KeepNote: Viable Alternative to NoteCase

Filed under
Software

linux-magazine.com: NoteCase has always been an indispensable application in my productivity toolbox. So the news that NoteCase's developer ceased its development sent me scrambling for a replacement.

Mono developer uses f-word to abuse RMS

itwire.com: Novell vice-president Miguel de Icaza's Mono project has the ability to attract the right kind of developer to its ranks.

$250 Desktop Runs Ubuntu, Windows 7 and OS X?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

starryhope.com: I recently wanted to get a new desktop computer to use for some programming projects. Can I get by with something as cheap as this $90 CPU/motherboard combo? Could I run Ubuntu, Windows 7 and OS X all on this dirt cheap hardware?

VirtualBox 3.0.0 is amazing!

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: Just a few days ago, VirtualBox 3.0.0 has been released amidst a flurry of excitement. This was a great opportunity to see how well it fares, both against its predecessors and VMware Server.

Ohio Linux Fest: 40th Anniversary of Unix - Call for Papers ending

Filed under
Linux

jon maddog Hall: I happened to have a few minutes last night, and I chose to sign onto the Ohio Linux Fest's (OLF) IRC channel to participate in one of their planning meetings. Big mistake, as I walked away with a couple of "todo" items. Beth Lynn Eicher, their fearless leader and taskmaster, lets no one go without a task.......

"Windows 7 is the same as Ubuntu"

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

zdnet.com: Their underlying architectures are quite a bit different, Gnome looks different than the 7 UI, etc., but to an average 17-year-old, there just wasn’t any meaningful difference between the two operating systems.

First CentOS book available as ebook

Filed under
Linux

dag.wieers.com/blog: About 18 months ago I blogged about the fact there was no book that focused on CentOS. Since a few days the first book about CentOS, and only CentOS, is available as an ebook from APRESS.COM.

Live Linux Gaming (live.linuX-gamers.net)

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Lately I’ve been looking at different distributions but there’s another angle of desktop Linux that bears looking at from time to time too: gaming. Yes, there actually are Linux gamers out there and, despite some shortcomings, it is quite possible to play some games on your Linux system.

Let's Settle the Mono Debate

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: To most people, Mono is a disease that leaves young people tired and listless. But to members of the free software community, Mono is something worse: a controversy that leaves everybody over-wrought and mistrusting each other.

An Interview With A Linux Game Porter

Filed under
Interviews
Gaming

phoronix.com: Recently on our forums, Frank Earl (who goes by the synonym Svartalf), has been seeking the input of Linux gamers as to what games they would like to see ported to Linux. Frank has been working for Linux Game Publishing for a few years porting various titles to Linux.

Beyond Ubuntu: Canonical Pursues New Revenue Streams

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: At first glance, Canonical is an operating system company — built around Ubuntu Linux. But take a closer look at Canonical’s moves during the first half of 2009, and you’ll find the company has increasingly bet its revenue stream on cloud, online and consulting/support services.

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More in Tux Machines

Games and Software Leftovers

  • Golem 0.6.0 released for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows
    Golem Project, creator of the first global market for idle computer power today announced it released Golem 0.6.0 for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows. The team stated that the majority of changes are not directly visible to the user, but there are a few noteworthy modifications.
  • Stardock CEO asking to see interest in Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation on Linux with Vulkan
    Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [GOG][Steam][Official Site] will come to Linux if Stardock see enough requests for it. The CEO of Stardock has requested to see how much interest there is.
  • Chrome won

    The chart above shows the percentage market share of the 4 major browsers over the last 6 years, across all devices. The data is from StatCounter and you can argue that the data is biased in a bunch of different ways, but at the macro level it's safe to say that Chrome is eating the browser market, and everyone else except Safari is getting obliterated.

  • Mailman 3.1.0 released
    The 3.1.0 release of the Mailman mailing list manager is out. "Two years after the original release of Mailman 3.0, this version contains a huge number of improvements across the entire stack. Many bugs have been fixed and new features added in the Core, Postorius (web u/i), and HyperKitty (archiver). Upgrading from Mailman 2.1 should be better too. We are seeing more production sites adopt Mailman 3, and we've been getting great feedback as these have rolled out. Important: mailman-bundler, our previous recommended way of deploying Mailman 3, has been deprecated. Abhilash Raj is putting the finishing touches on Docker images to deploy everything, and he'll have a further announcement in a week or two." New features include support for Python 3.5 and 3.6, MySQL support, new REST resources and methods, user interface and user experience improvements, and more.
  • Cockpit – Monitor And Administer Linux Servers Via Web Browser
    Cockpit is free, open source Server administration tool that allows you to easily monitor and administrator single or multiple Linux servers via a web browser. It helps the system admins to do simple administration tasks, such as starting containers, administrating storage, configuring network, inspecting logs and so on. Switching between Terminal and Cockpit is no big deal. You can the manage the system’s services either from the Cockpit, or from the host’s Terminal. Say for example, if you started a service in Terminal, you can stop it from the Cockpit. Similarly, if an error occurs in the terminal, it can be seen in the Cockpit journal interface and vice versa. It is capable of monitoring multiple Linux servers at the same time. All you need to do is just add the systems you wanted to monitor, and Cockpit will look after them.
  • Buttercup – A Modern Password Manager for Linux
    Buttercup is a cross-platform, free, and open-source password manager with which you can remotely access any of your accounts using a single master password. It features a modern minimal UI, password imports from 3rd-party apps, and basic merge conflict resolution.
  • FreeFileSync The Best Backup And File Synchronization Tool For All Platforms
    FreeFileSync is an open source free to download and use software that can sync your files easily to another disk while maintaining permissions and other important stuff. It is cross platform so you can use it on any OS without any problem. Let us see how to download and use it in Linux.

today's howtos

GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work
    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release. Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.
  • gresg – an XML resources generator
    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.
  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI
    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE