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Friday, 24 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Google Chrome 36 Brings Web Components to the Browser Rianne Schestowitz 18/07/2014 - 7:36am
Story Heterogeneous multicore dev platform targets Linux Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2014 - 7:26am
Story Calibre 1.45 eBook Reader and Editor Brings Improvements for Kindle Books Rianne Schestowitz 18/07/2014 - 7:10am
Story OpenWRT adds IPv6, preps for IoT future Rianne Schestowitz 17/07/2014 - 8:48pm
Story Fedora 21 Starts Working Towards Its Alpha Release Rianne Schestowitz 17/07/2014 - 8:44pm
Story Final Version of FreeBSD 9.3 Arrives with Improved ZFS Filesystem Rianne Schestowitz 17/07/2014 - 7:26pm
Story UBUNTU 13.10 SAUCY SALAMANDER END OF LIFE: JULY 17, 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 17/07/2014 - 7:18pm
Story Evolution 3.12.4 Now Supports Google Tasks Rianne Schestowitz 17/07/2014 - 7:08pm
Story OpenMW 0.31 Has A Ton Of Changes Rianne Schestowitz 17/07/2014 - 6:59pm
Story The state of accessibility in Linux and open source software Rianne Schestowitz 17/07/2014 - 6:54pm

Good Linux Users Don’t Talk About Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

pcmech.com: Is it all too typical on the internet to hear a Linux user go full-on zealot style and say, "YEAH! I use Linux! F**k Microsoft! You people are sheeple! Down with the status quo!" Blah, blah, blah, frickin’ blah.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu 9.10 sees the cloud above the trees

  • Linpus Linux Lite OS caught on video
  • Ubuntu 9.04 Alpha 5 Isn’t Ready for Primetime, Yet
  • Blueprint for Competing with Proprietary Software
  • Can TouchBook Revitalize Linux Netbooks?
  • Audio Production Hardware At Studio Dave
  • Linux Fedora KDE 10: First Look
  • SCO What? It's Patently over for Copyright
  • You should refuse stable
  • It's Time to Cash In on Firefox
  • Why Sugar's Future Looks Sweet: User Feedback
  • Sabayon 4.1 Gnome Preview
  • Forthcoming VDR Release To Support VDPAU
  • Trading places: IBM and Microsoft on open source
  • Intuitive packaging is vital to Gentoo
  • The best racing game ever runs on Linux
  • Hire Open Source Developers -- or Partner With Them?
  • The Open Source Community, the Worldwide Academy of Programming, Does Not Discriminate
  • Linux Foundation’s “We’re Linux” Contest Enters Final Week
  • Sneak Preview of Adobe Reader 9.x on Linux and Solaris x86
  • K is for Kuki and it might be good enough for your Aspire One
  • Ounce Labs: Open Source Software Is Perfectly Secure
  • News from Pardus

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto Make an MPEG Picture Slideshow with digiKam in Ubuntu

  • Gentoo : A complete and utter retards guide to installing
  • 6 Ubuntu Package Management tips for the Fedora User
  • Jaunty 64-bit and Eclipse
  • Move /home to it’s own partition
  • The Great KDE Font Mystery
  • Simple guide to Sound Solutions for Ubuntu Users
  • Upgrading Ubuntu to the Cutting Edge
  • iopp: howto get i/o information per process
  • Remove Compiz from Ubuntu
  • Setting up SSHFS

Linux Performance: Different Distributions, Very Different Results

Filed under
Linux

oreilly.com: When I write reviews of various Linux distributions and describe differences in performance I almost invariably get a comment to the effect that all Linux distros are essentially the same: running the same kernel, the same libraries, the same filesystems. Performance should be essentially the same, right?

Netbooks open door to Windows alternatives

Filed under
Linux

reuters.com: As netbooks surge in popularity, open-source Linux-based operating systems have established a toehold on the low-cost, stripped-down computers as an alternative to Microsoft Corp's Windows.

Behind Red Hat's Consistency: A Surprising Concentration on Investing

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com/blog: Savio Rodrigues is out with a very interesting post on Red Hat's financial consistency. Long story short, he concludes that over the past two years a whopping--borderline shocking--48 percent of Red Hat's income before taxes is classified as "Other Income."

Dvorak Likes Linux

Filed under
Linux

pcmag.com: Almost all the newest hardware coming out has Linux support. The critical mass has been reached, and it's time everyone tried Ubuntu.

Also: Microsoft's business model is done

How should we spread the Linux word?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: Linux is great, it's fantastic, it's superkalafragilisticexpealidocious. It's everything you ever dreamed about. It's so good it invented sliced bread. If you tell a non-Linux person this they will most probably say "What you talking about Willis?"

The Good, The Bad And The Open

Filed under
OSS

informationweek.com/blog: A quote attributed to various sources goes as follows: "Technology is neither good nor bad, nor is it neutral." It takes the shape you give to it, but it will always take one shape or another. The same could be said of open source, and ought to be.

System76 Serval Professional Notebook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

phoronix.com: Finding a laptop that can run Linux is no longer much of a challenge. In this review we are looking at the System76 Serval Professional notebook.

Out of the Park

Filed under
Gaming

tuxradar.com: If baseball is what gets you cooking on gas, prepare to say goodbye to your family, become a recluse, and thrive on a world of management decisions and statistics: Out of the Park 9 is available on Linux.

Dream Linux 3.5 - Results and Summary

Filed under
Linux

community.zdnet: I've had a few days now to try out Dream Linux on all of my laptops, and the results are interesting, if mixed:

Interview: Steve McIntyre of Debian

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

h-online.com: Steve McIntyre, Debian Project Leader talks about his work with the free open source Linux distribution.

One Ubuntu To Rule Them All

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxcanuck.wordpress: We have all seen Ubuntu emerge as the top distribution. You can argue the figures if you like, but by any standard that I have seen it is far and away the most popular distribution. The biggest problem however is not the Canonical Ubuntu derivatives but the growing number of non-Canonical ones.

10 reasons why GNOME is better than KDE

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: A new battle is playing out in the Linux desktop arena. See why Jack Wallen believes that today’s GNOME has pulled ahead of today’s KDE in terms of design, stability, and usability.

Novell's SUSE Linux futures

Filed under
SUSE

blogs.computerworld: Novell is in trouble. As Novell CFO Dana Russell said during the recent earnings call, "Our Linux business is dependent on large deals, which may result in some fluctuations of our quarterly invoicing. Moving ahead, Novell plans on reducing the prices of its products.

Frets on Fire Confirms I Am Better at Compiling Than Playing Guitar

Filed under
Gaming

ostatic.com/blog: Late last year I broke down and picked up Rock Band for the resident game console, a Nintendo Wii. Given the humbling experience Rock Band (continues) to be for me, I wasn't exactly eager to try out the open source rhythm game, Frets on Fire. However,

10 Reasons You Should Not Switch To Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: Not a single week passes by without me bumping in to yet another blog post giving you 10 – 25 or even 100 reasons you should switch to Linux right now. I say bah humbug to them. If you need someone to give you 100 reasons to switch your current OS of choice, you are better of sticking with it.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 293

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Tutorial: An introduction to Logical Volume Management

  • News: openSUSE releases trademark guidelines, Ubuntu delivers mainline kernel, Debian elects new project leader, ULTILEX live CD
  • Released last week: Zenwalk Linux 6.0
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.2 and beyond, Ubuntu 9.10 release schedule
  • New additions: Damn Vulnerable Linux, Parslinux, Tiny Core Linux, wattOS
  • New distributions: ArchPwn, Ultra X Linux, VoIP on CD
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Im worried about Gnome

Filed under
Software

hyperfish.org: Gnome has been doing some worrying things recently, firstly we have the whole new notifications debacle, it shows the rifts that can be caused by one little thing in gnome, I hold the opinion that its “only notifications” and am worried how easily the little things get turned into big issues.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: BSD

Security Leftovers

  • Stop using SHA1 encryption: It’s now completely unsafe, Google proves
    Security researchers have achieved the first real-world collision attack against the SHA-1 hash function, producing two different PDF files with the same SHA-1 signature. This shows that the algorithm's use for security-sensitive functions should be discontinued as soon as possible. SHA-1 (Secure Hash Algorithm 1) dates back to 1995 and has been known to be vulnerable to theoretical attacks since 2005. The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology has banned the use of SHA-1 by U.S. federal agencies since 2010, and digital certificate authorities have not been allowed to issue SHA-1-signed certificates since Jan. 1, 2016, although some exemptions have been made. However, despite these efforts to phase out the use of SHA-1 in some areas, the algorithm is still fairly widely used to validate credit card transactions, electronic documents, email PGP/GPG signatures, open-source software repositories, backups and software updates.
  • on pgp
    First and foremost I have to pay respect to PGP, it was an important weapon in the first cryptowar. It has helped many whistleblowers and dissidents. It is software with quite interesting history, if all the cryptograms could tell... PGP is also deeply misunderstood, it is a highly successful political tool. It was essential in getting crypto out to the people. In my view PGP is not dead, it's just old and misunderstood and needs to be retired in honor. However the world has changed from the internet happy times of the '90s, from a passive adversary to many active ones - with cheap commercially available malware as turn-key-solutions, intrusive apps, malware, NSLs, gag orders, etc.
  • Cloudflare’s Cloudbleed is the worst privacy leak in recent Internet history
    Cloudflare revealed today that, for months, all of its protected websites were potentially leaking private information across the Internet. Specifically, Cloudflare’s reverse proxies were dumping uninitialized memory; that is to say, bleeding private data. The issue, termed Cloudbleed by some (but not its discoverer Tavis Ormandy of Google Project Zero), is the greatest privacy leak of 2017 and the year has just started. For months, since 2016-09-22 by their own admission, CloudFlare has been leaking private information through Cloudbleed. Basically, random data from random sites (again, it’s worth mentioning that every site that used CloudFlare in the last half year should be considered to having fallen victim to this) would be randomly distributed across the open Internet, and then indefinitely cached along the way.
  • Serious Cloudflare bug exposed a potpourri of secret customer data
    Cloudflare, a service that helps optimize the security and performance of more than 5.5 million websites, warned customers today that a recently fixed software bug exposed a range of sensitive information that could have included passwords and cookies and tokens used to authenticate users. A combination of factors made the bug particularly severe. First, the leakage may have been active since September 22, nearly five months before it was discovered, although the greatest period of impact was from February 13 and February 18. Second, some of the highly sensitive data that was leaked was cached by Google and other search engines. The result was that for the entire time the bug was active, hackers had the ability to access the data in real-time by making Web requests to affected websites and to access some of the leaked data later by crafting queries on search engines. "The bug was serious because the leaked memory could contain private information and because it had been cached by search engines," Cloudflare CTO John Graham-Cumming wrote in a blog post published Thursday. "We are disclosing this problem now as we are satisfied that search engine caches have now been cleared of sensitive information. We have also not discovered any evidence of malicious exploits of the bug or other reports of its existence."

Security Leftovers

  • Change all the passwords (again)
    Looks like it is time to change all the passwords again. There’s a tiny little flaw in a CDN used … everywhere, it seems.
  • Today's leading causes of DDoS attacks [Ed: The so-called 'Internet of things' (crappy devices with identical passwords) is a mess; programmers to blame, not Linux]
    Of the most recent mega 100Gbps attacks in the last quarter, most of them were directly attributed to the Mirai botnet. The Mirai botnet works by exploiting the weak security on many Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The program finds its victims by constantly scanning the internet for IoT devices, which use factory default or hard-coded usernames and passwords.
  • How to Set Up An SSL Certificate on Your Website [via "Steps To Secure Your Website With An SSL Certificate"]
  • SHA-1 is dead, long live SHA-1!
    Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you heard that some researchers managed to create a SHA-1 collision. The short story as to why this matters is the whole purpose of a hashing algorithm is to make it impossible to generate collisions on purpose. Unfortunately though impossible things are usually also impossible so in reality we just make sure it’s really really hard to generate a collision. Thanks to Moore’s Law, hard things don’t stay hard forever. This is why MD5 had to go live on a farm out in the country, and we’re not allowed to see it anymore … because it’s having too much fun. SHA-1 will get to join it soon.
  • SHA1 collision via ASCII art
    Happy SHA1 collision day everybody! If you extract the differences between the good.pdf and bad.pdf attached to the paper, you'll find it all comes down to a small ~128 byte chunk of random-looking binary data that varies between the files.
  • PayThink Knowledge is power in fighting new Android attack bot
    Android users and apps have become a major part of payments and financial services, carrying an increased risk for web crime. It is estimated that there are 107.7 million Android Smartphone users in the U.S. who have downloaded more than 65 million apps from the Google App Store, and each one of them represents a smorgasbord of opportunity for hackers to steal user credentials and other information.
  • Red Hat: 'use after free' vulnerability found in Linux kernel's DCCP protocol IPV6 implementation
    Red Hat Product Security has published details of an "important" security vulnerability in the Linux kernel. The IPv6 implementation of the DCCP protocol means that it is possible for a local, unprivileged user to alter kernel memory and escalate their privileges. Known as the "use-after-free" flaw, CVE-2017-6074 affects a number of Red Hat products including Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and Red Hat Openshift Online v2. Mitigating factors include the requirement for a potential attacker to have access to a local account on a machine, and for IPV6 to be enabled, but it is still something that will be of concern to Linux users. Describing the vulnerability, Red Hat says: "This flaw allows an attacker with an account on the local system to potentially elevate privileges. This class of flaw is commonly referred to as UAF (Use After Free.) Flaws of this nature are generally exploited by exercising a code path that accesses memory via a pointer that no longer references an in use allocation due to an earlier free() operation. In this specific issue, the flaw exists in the DCCP networking code and can be reached by a malicious actor with sufficient access to initiate a DCCP network connection on any local interface. Successful exploitation may result in crashing of the host kernel, potential execution of code in the context of the host kernel or other escalation of privilege by modifying kernel memory structures."

Android Leftovers