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Thursday, 23 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 6 things Android Wear smartwatches can do that the Apple Watch can't Rianne Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 7:49pm
Story Teclast X70 3G Is the First Tablet with Intel Atom x3, Sells for $50 Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 7:32pm
Story New Linux rootkit leverages graphics cards for stealth Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 6:19pm
Story Controversial Lennart Poettering Finds His Place In Linux Community Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 5:41pm
Story A More Stable Future for Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 5:24pm
Story LibreOffice 4.4.3 Released, Available To Install/Upgrade In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Mohd Sohail 08/05/2015 - 10:19am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 9:36am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 9:35am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 9:34am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2015 - 9:34am

Opinion: "Confessions of an Ubuntu Fanboy" Response

Filed under
Ubuntu

montanalinux.org: Just got done reading, "Confessions of an Ubuntu Fanboy". While I'm glad the author has decided to be more practical in his promotion of Linux and Ubuntu, I strongly disagree with some of his conclusions.

coupla teehees

Filed under
Humor

Oracle Still To Make OpenSolaris Changes

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: One of the open-source projects that Oracle hasn't been too open about their intentions with has been OpenSolaris. Solaris Express Community Edition (SXCE) already closed up last month and there hasn't been too much information flowing out about the next OpenSolaris release.

FOSS Legal Strategy Session Silicon Valley: Success!

Filed under
OSS

lawandlifesiliconvalley.com/blog: On February 10, 2010, the Linux Foundation and the Open Source Initiative co sponsored their first Legal Strategic Planning Session. I am glad to declare it a success. We had a very diverse group both professionally and geographically, with participants from Europe, Japan and the US.

Let My Codecs Go

Filed under
Software
  • Let My Codecs Go: Will Google Free VP8?
  • Risks in Google killing Adobe Flash
  • HTML5 looks like broken hackish kludge

Customizing the Ubuntu Application Stack Before Installation

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Ubuntu is way easier to install than certain other operating systems. But it would be even greater if I could select which applications I wanted on my new system before the Ubiquity installer goes about its business.

Bruce Perens: Inside Open Source's Historic Victory

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: Jacobsen v. Katzer is closed, after five years. Open Source won, and big. The details are fascinating. Let's start with the Open Source developer: Bob Jacobsen.

Say Everything: Blogging as open-source journalism.

Filed under
Reviews

As fascinating as the chronicle of blogging are the constant dismissals of it through its decade-plus history, as both a literary medium and an alternative to professional journalism. And Rathergate, the defining moment when the latter got its comeuppance, is thoroughly documented...

More here...

Tips to help users migrate to OpenOffice

Filed under
OOo
HowTos

ghacks.net: The office suite. Ah the importance you hold over the PC user. You help our business to flow, you help us to draft our papers and novels, and you help us communicate. But what of those users who previously were using Microsoft Office or any other office suite?

the futility of termcap in Linux

Filed under
Linux

landley.net: Back in the 1970's Unix systems used to output to various hardware devices. First there were teletypes. This is what "tty" is an abbreviation for: teletype. By the time Linux got started, external display hardware that spoke its own serial protocol had been gone for a decade. This meant that terminfo and termcap no longer served any real purpose.

What's wrong with Gentoo, anyway?

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.flameeyes.eu: Yesterday I snapped and declared my intent to resign from Gentoo. Why did that happen? Well, it’s a huge mix of problems, all joined together by one common factor: no matter how much work I pour into getting Gentoo working like it should be, more problems are generated by sloppy work from at least one or two developers.

A handbook for the open source way, written the open source way

Filed under
OSS

opensource.com: Remember the Seinfeld episode where Kramer had the idea to make a coffee table book about coffee tables? I always thought that was a pretty elegant idea. Well, a few months ago, some of the smart folks on Red Hat's community architecture team had a similarly elegant idea:

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 342

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Interview with Clement Lefebvre and first look at Linux Mint 8
  • News: Linux Mint ends "distro hopping", Debian releases first 6.0 installer, Ubuntu outlines new netbook interface with Enlightenment, OpenSolaris developers fear for project's future, Mandriva "Cooker" updates
  • Questions and answers: Disk mount options
  • Released last week: Calculate Linux 10.2, Element 1.0
  • Upcoming releases: PC-BSD 8.0, Ubuntu 10.04 Alpha 3, Mandriva Linux 2010.1 Alpha 3
  • New distributions: Shackbox, Tritech Service System
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Linux Mint 8 Fluxbox CE review:

Filed under
Linux

linuxcritic.wordpress: As I mentioned on February 12th, the long-awaited Fluxbox Community Edition of Linux Mint has been released, and I’ve had the opportunity to install it on my laptop to give it a whirl.

fun with irc clients

Filed under
Software

scrye.com: So, after having a pretty productive Fedora day yesterday (I cleaned up EPEL buildroot override tags/closed tickets, caught up on all my mailing lists and such, started in on some package reviews, helped people on IRC, etc) I decided to play around with some new IRC clients today.

My typical archlinux desktop

Filed under
Linux

distrocheck.wordpress: The more distrohopping I do, the more I realize I’ll never feel as comfortable as on arch. I don’t like being forced to use applications or settings that other people think are the best, I have my own best, and I can only do that if I build a system from the ground up.

Tin Hat: High security Linux

Filed under
Linux

net-security.org: Tin Hat is a Linux distribution derived from hardened Gentoo which aims to provide a very secure, stable and fast Desktop environment that lives purely in RAM.

CloudLinux OS Set to Surface At Parallels Summit

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: The VAR Guy is booked to meet software giants and disruptive upstarts at Parallels Summit 2010 in Miami. Among the anticipated meetings: A sit-down with Cloud Linux Inc. founder and CEO Igor Seletskiy. The big question: Does the hosting world really need yet another Linux distribution?

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Making Myself Clear About Ubuntu Development
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #181
  • Open letter to Google: free VP8 on YouTube
  • Pino Twitter Client Goes Experimental:
  • Chocolate Doom 1.3.0
  • Of the powers we choose to lose
  • Aseigo: day 2 of tokamak 4 (and a bit about day 1, too)
  • Marave 0.6 is out
  • Lucid development: Hook for catching X.org freezes
  • Linux Basement - Episode 50 - Milestone Debauchery

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Installing Debian via USB
  • How to install skype on Ubuntu 9.10
  • How to Get Mac’s QuickLook Function In Ubuntu
  • How to install Angry IP Scanner on Ubuntu
  • Getting list of referers out of Apache logs
  • Install Perl modules using CPAN
  • Zattoo - Watch Online TV for free
  • Install Keepalived To Provide IP Failover For Web Cluster
  • Debian Console, Framebuffer, Grub2
  • BleachBit- frees disk space, removes junk, and guards your privacy
  • File compressors in Linux | gzip zip tar
  • GUI GRUB Editor using Startup Manager in Ubuntu
  • Resize multiple pictures with a too high resolution
  • Pure EFI Linux Boot on Macbooks
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More in Tux Machines

Command Line: FFmpeg, Coinmon, Tizonia

  • FFmpeg Lands OpenCL Improvements
    Besides a lot of NVDEC code landing for the next FFmpeg release, there's also been a number of OpenCL improvements that were just committed to this multimedia library's codebase. The work landed yesterday includes removing an older and experimental OpenCL API while introducing a new OpenCL "hwcontext" implementation. This in turn has introduced an OpenCL overlay filter and OpenCL unsharp mask filter.
  • Coinmon – Check Cryptocurrency Prices From Commandline
    A while ago, we published a guide about Cli-Fyi – a potentially useful command line query tool. Using Cli-Fyi, we can easily find out the latest price of a cryptocurrency and lots of other useful details. Today, we are going to see yet another cryptcurrency price checker tool called “Coinmon”. Unlike Cli.Fyi, Coinmon is only for checking the price of various cryptocurrencies. Nothing more! Coinmon will check cryptocurrencies’ prices, changes right from your Terminal. It will fetch all details from from coinmarketcap.com APIs. It is quite useful for those who are both Crypto investors and Engineers.
  • Command Line Music Player for Spotify, YouTube & Other Music Streaming Services
    Tizonia is a command-line music player that let you stream music from Spotify, Google Play Music, YouTube, Soundcloud, and more, straight from the terminal.

OSS: Configuration Management, Man(ual), Patent Traps (5G and the Internet of Things), Sponsored Development

  • 9 Excellent Open Source Configuration Management Applications
    End users at public and private sector organizations sometimes perceive IT teams a barrier to the development of the business. When the business demands new services and applications, it may take months before progress is made. Why is that? It’s too common for IT teams to spend too much time fighting fires; after all they can come from so many different sources. An IT team’s main responsibility is to maintain, secure, and operate an organization’s systems and networks. This, in itself, carries a huge responsibility. IT teams that maintain technology infrastructure, deploy applications, and provisioning environments with many manual tasks are inefficient. In modern environments, services are rarely deployed in isolation. Simple applications may need several services to run – such as a web server and a database. Deploying more complex systems, many services may need installing, configuring, and linked together. Streamlining system administration must therefore be part of an IT solution. And one of the most time-consuming activity for IT teams is the management of the business’s infrastructure. Automation minimizes manual work, reducing the risk of human mistakes, and offering the ability to quickly deploy new services and applications without risking reliability. Whether it involves container orchestration, real-time big data, deep learning, or stream processing, large software demands operations to be automated. Here’s where configuration management system software steps in. This software automates the configuration of machines to a particular state. Like any other tools, they are designed to solve specific problems in certain ways. The goal is to get a system from whatever state it is in, into the desired state. Configuration management software are the tools of choice for many system administrators and devops professionals. Cloud platforms enable teams to deploy and maintain applications serving thousands of users, and the leading open source configuration management tools offer ways to automate the various processes.
  • 'Gimme Gimme Gimme' Easter egg in man breaks automated tests at 00:30
    The maintainer of the Linux manual program man has scrapped an "Easter egg" after it broke a user's automatic code tests. On Tuesday, Unix systems administrator Jeff Schaller wrote in a Stack Exchange post: "We've noticed that some of our automatic tests fail when they run at 00:30 but work fine the rest of the day. They fail with the message 'gimme gimme gimme' in stderr, which wasn't expected."
  • Open source and standards – The path towards 5G and the Internet of Things
    Following the success of last year’s event, the 2nd workshop “Open Source and Standards – The Path Towards 5G and the Internet of Things”, jointly organised by NGMN and the ITU, took place on 1st November 2017 in Bellevue (Seattle), Washington, USA. The workshop was hosted by Microsoft and co-organised by the IPR Plenary of the NGMN Alliance and the International Telecommunication Union. Bringing together key representatives of a wide range of industry, including standards bodies, open source communities and academia, the discussions focused on how best standard-setting organisations and open source communities can capitalise upon each other’s deliverables and expertise for building a consistent and coherent 5G eco-system. With more than 100 participants, the workshop discussed how diverse stakeholders can rely on the respective strengths and development models to place a broad range of industries in a strong position to achieve the common vision for 5G and beyond.
  • Sponsored development is a win-win for users and developers
    There is a myth that simply by making a software platform open source, qualified people will give up their nights and weekends to contribute to its development. With rare exceptions, that's not how the open source world works. Building a community of contributors takes time, and complex applications often have a steep learning curve before a developer becomes comfortable working with the code. Open source software companies are the fuel behind a lot of software development, forming the communities and providing the financial backing that support it. And, like any other type of business, open source software companies need to earn money to stay in business.

Games: GameShell, GOG, Oxygen Not Included and More

Linux 4.15 Will Treat The HTC Vive VR Headset As "Non-Desktop"

Currently if plugging in the HTC Vive for a virtual reality experience on Linux, the head-mounted display (HMD) is treated just as a conventional display. But now with a new set of changes for Linux 4.15, the kernel will know it's a "non-desktop" display. Besides the DRM leasing support that has already landed during the Linux 4.15 merge window with the main DRM pull request, David Airlie has sent in another pull today for further benefiting SteamVR with Linux 4.15. (And among other benefits, also the AMDGPU priority scheduling landed too for 4.15 as another benefit for VR Linux gaming when using AMD graphics.) Read more