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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 23 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Introducing Netrunner 13.12 Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2014 - 8:35pm
Story A Look At The New Firefox UI On Ubuntu Linux Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2014 - 6:37pm
Blog entry Justice Rianne Schestowitz 2 08/02/2014 - 6:33pm
Story LXLE 12.04.4 officially released. Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2014 - 5:16pm
Story Another Init System: Sinit - The Suckless Init System Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2014 - 4:22pm
Story GCC & LLVM Developers May Begin Collaborating Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2014 - 1:31pm
Story Best Desktop-Ready Chrome Applications that Work Great on Linux Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2014 - 1:27pm
Story Android/Linux Is The Most Popular OS In India Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2014 - 1:20pm
Story Lightworks Video Editor Pulls Plenty of Weight Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2014 - 1:14pm
Story What's the best entry point for women in computing? Open source. Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2014 - 1:10pm

GIMP 2.5.4 Development Release

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GIMP approaches the next stable release and only a handful bugs are left to be fixed before GIMP 2.6 is ready.

5 best-practices of a successful Linux user

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Linux There would have been one or more reasons which would have tempted each one of us to try Linux, and some of us just never looked back. Few would have probably turned out to be Linux professionals, while others would still be struggling with what’s good and what’s perfect.

I want to break free!

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Software Freeme2 is a program for stripping the DRM from commonly distributed music and sound files. More specifically it strips it from windows sound files of the format wmv, wma and asf. It also can do the same from video and audio streams.

today's leftovers

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  • Can Ubuntu Overcome The Status Quo?

  • Microsoft hails open source outreach
  • Found: The World’s Hottest Ubuntu Linux Deployment
  • Review: Star Wars: The Force Unleashed
  • OLPC rivals get 'vicious'
  • The Road to Geekdom
  • How to uninstall application in ubuntu cleanly
  • Grep: RRTFM
  • Tux3 Report: What next?
  • BECTA Back in Play
  • Shuttleworth urges calm in Firefox/Ubuntu flap
  • Change Boot-up options in Ubuntu

Firefox without EULAs — Update

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Mitchell Baker: We’re still working on this. There’s been a bunch of helpful feedback. We appreciate this. We think we’ve integrated the feedback into something that’s a good solution; different from out last version in both its essence and its presentation and content.

Look Ma, No Terminal

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Software A common misconception with Linux is that you have to know how to use the terminal in order for you to use linux. The fact is you won’t have to use the linux terminal more than you would use CMD in Windows or the terminal in Mac OSX.

Oldham, England Brings Open Source To Schools

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OSS It's good to see news about continuing adoption of open source software in schools around the world. The Linux-based lash-up they've chosen uses open source Squid cache and web proxy software along with MySQL and WebSense filtering and security software. MySQL was reportedly chosen because "it's free and simple to use."

My New Best Friend: Unetbootin

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linuxcanuck.wordpress: I install lots of distros. Several each week. I am a self-confessed distro junky. I have a collection of ISOs that go back many years. In fact I have boxes of spools of full CDs and DVDs. Aside from the space and environmental concerns, it is an expensive and time consuming obsession. Now, I have a solution.

Tinest Linux system, yet?

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Linux CompuLab introduced a tiny fanless PC using 4-6 Watts of power. The Linux-ready "Fit-PC Slim" measures 4.3 x 3.9 x 1.2 inches (110 x 100 x 30mm), but includes a 500MHz AMD Geode LX800, Ethernet, VGA output, WiFi, and a 2.5-inch hard drive option, says CompuLab.

Video: The history of Fedora

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Linux Who is that masked man? It’s the Fedora Project’s Greg DeKoenigsberg. And who better to talk about this history of the Fedora than someone who has been involved nearly every step of the way…

Java Sound & Music Software for Linux, Part 2

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Software In this second part of my survey I list and briefly describe some of the Java sound and music applications known to work under Linux. Java applications show up in almost every category found at and the Applications Database at

odds & ends

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  • Opera 9.6 beta: screenshots

  • PC-BSD 7.0 Screenshots
  • Adobe AIR launches on Linux
  • about:mozilla - 2010 goals, Add-on survey, and more…
  • Chromify Firefox with Chromifox
  • Linux Outlaws 54 - Compiling in Coffee Shops

few howtos:

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  • How to access to music with amarok from anywhere (almost)

  • How to configure Evolution Mail Client for GMAIL
  • Basic crash course: Saving user settings
  • Untar multiple files in a directory
  • How to go a particular line or word in vi

OpenSolaris 2008.05 is robust and ready

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OS Sun has been getting serious about opening up its software for a few years now. OpenSolaris, an open source Unix operating system like Linux and BSD, released in May, is its latest foray into the open source arena. I found OpenSolaris to be a production-ready OS that works equally well on desktops and servers.

The double-edged sword of the economy for open source

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blogs.the451group: While I believe open source may have an advantage in hard economic times when organizations are truly being forced to cut costs, I’m not sure I entirely buy either perspective. I see a danger for open source as some of its largest enterprise users stumble or even cease to be.

5 Cool Apps to Make the Linux Terminal More Productive

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Software If you work on Linux you’ll know that the command line is the way to go (in some cases at least). If you are in GUI mode than you can access the command line via the Terminal. Here are some applications/utilities that will transform your command line experience.

You're not trapped!

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Linux Everyday, some attorney, somewhere is having an issue with Windows. Usually, when I suggest they switch to Linux, I get resistance. This is due largely to their fear of change. My message to them is simply that they are not trapped by Windows.

3G Cellular Success with Ubuntu

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Ubuntu Hooray! My Sierra Wireless AirCard 880 is working with Ubuntu 8.04.1 (Hardy Heron)! This is something I have been wanting to get working for quite a while. What it means is that I won't have to boot Vista in order to use my laptop on the train and bus during my daily commute.

Save time at the command line with shell aliases and functions

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HowTos Familiarity with command prompts and shell scripts is still necessary if you want to get the most from your GNU/Linux system, but the less time you spend doing that the better, right? Two powerful ways to minimize your time at the command line are shell aliases and functions.

Mozilla Re-Thinking Firefox EULA

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Moz/FF In a conversation with, Mitchell Baker, Chairperson of Mozilla, admitted that Mozilla may not need both the EULA and open source license, with the EULA the likely casualty.

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More in Tux Machines

Tizen News

  • New details revealed about future Samsung QLED TVs
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Red Hat and Fedora

  • Rivals Red Hat, Mirantis Announce New OpenStack Partnerships
    The cloud rivals both announce new telco alliances as competition in the cloud market heats up. Red Hat and Mirantis both announced large agreements this week that bring their respective OpenStack technologies to carrier partners. The news comes ahead of the OpenStack Summit that kicks off in Barcelona, Spain, on Oct. 24. Red Hat announced on Oct. 19 that it has a new OpenStack partnership with telco provider Ericsson. "Ericsson and Red Hat recognize that we share a common belief in using open source to transform the telecommunications industry, and we are collaborating to bring more open solutions, from OpenStack-based clouds to software-defined networking and infrastructure, to customers," Radhesh Balakrishnan, general manager of OpenStack at Red Hat, told eWEEK.
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Development News

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  • Hack This: An Overdue Python Primer
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Android Leftovers