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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • FreeNAS ready for the next step – Future of FreeNAS
  • Pentoo 2009.0 Screenshots
  • Building Dream Machines, Studio PC and Media Server
  • Video Review: Nokia N900
  • Red Hat's CEO on Obama jobs summit – 'Creating jobs the open source way'
  • Update to openSUSE.org
  • KDE 4.4 Beta 1 experiences (openSUSE howto)
  • Need A College Degree? How About One In Growing Marijuana?
  • G&P: We All Had Our Dreams
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2009.12.04
  • Meet the GIMP - Episode 128: Beam it up, F-SPOT

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • HOWTO: Install Multiple Wine Versions on One System
  • How to setup Google Public DNS in Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala
  • Vmware vmplayer and kernel 2.6.32
  • How to sync your cellphone data in Linux
  • Vim 301: Getting Adept at Vim
  • gvim and karmic ubuntu... with a fix for you
  • Ten Powerful Linux Commands
  • Enable mod_rewrite in a Ubuntu server
  • SSH Tab Complete, RE: SSH Tab Complete
  • Create and Run a Linux Script to Run Linux Commands
  • Maintaining MySQL Databases

Quick AWN 0.4 Overview

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: AWN 0.4. is the next major version due for release and is currently in beta for people desperate to try it out. The point-four series has reworked AWN from a bottom-bound dock into something much more powerful and flexible and adding a slew of new features.

Linux Is Regaining Netbook Market Share Quickly

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

oreilly.com: Back in May I wrote an article titled Linux To Regain 50% Netbook Market Share after such predictions were made by Stephen Lim of Linpus Technologies and ABI Research. ABI Research published some new data last month and the results may surprise you.

On the OSS Meritocracy Myth

Filed under
OSS

thebeezspeaks.blogspot: What most people are still unable to understand is that the FOSS community is the FOSS community. There is no central body that governs it. You can "criticize" it, but most people can and will simply shrug their shoulders and get on with what they're doing.

Successfully completing a school semester with Linux

Filed under
Linux

thelinuxexperiment.com: One of my main fears about switching to a different operating system was that it would disrupt my studies. Fortunately, this fear was unfounded – in fact, I can confidently say that Linux actually made my school experience much easier and smoother.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 100 is out!

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #100 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out!

OpenDNS vs Google DNS

unixmen.com: Everyone knows that Google DNS was released this week, the basic logic was clear: Google has a vested interest in the internet being fast, and so they want to offer a free public utility to help it be faster.

5 Linux-based Cloud Businesses

daniweb.com: Amazon Web Services (AWS) uses it. Elastichosts uses it. Google uses it. Yahoo uses it. Engine Yard uses it. Facebook uses it. "It" is Linux, of course. But what else do all these companies have in common? If you said "cloud technology," you're correct.

some software stuff

Filed under
Software
  • Cricket Score applet for Gnome desktop
  • Emesene Gets A New Preferences Window, Adds Easy Theme Install
  • uzbl – a terminal for the web – in gentoo
  • Open ATI Driver More Popular Than Catalyst
  • KDE 4.4 Beta 1 – Tabbed Windows Review

Open source software license enforcement actions on the rise

Filed under
OSS
Legal

localtechwire.com: What do Verizon, Cisco Systems, Bell Microproducts, Super Micro Computer, Monsoon Multimedia, Xterasys Corp, High-Gain Antennas and Extreme Networks have in common? All of these companies were sued by the FSF or SFLC for open source software license violations.

Manage Your Schedule with Day Planner

Filed under
Software

linux-magazine.com: If a full-blown calendar application like Evolution of Lightning is overkill for your needs, try Day Planner. This simple yet efficient calendaring utility sports a refreshingly simple interface and it's ridiculously easy to use.

Back From The Wilderness With Mandriva One 2010

Filed under
MDV

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: With so many exciting new Linux distributions being released in the annual autumnal rush, you might wonder why I chose Mandriva 2010 (http://www2.mandriva.com/) to get back into the swing of Linux things. Mandriva 2010 has gone a long way toward changing my mind about KDE 4.

Where is Unix spirit ?

Filed under
Linux

linux-wizard.net: Where is Unix spirit ? Since some years, i had the feeling that the Unix spirit was more and more forgotten.

PCLinuxOS 2009.2 MiniMe Video and Screenshots

Filed under
PCLOS

beginlinux.wordpress: The PCLinuxOS 2009.2 MiniMe KDE Linux distribution is out and available for download. This release includes a minimal classic KDE 3.5.10 desktop and few extra applications.

The Ubuntu Release Cycle

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The Ubuntu Release Cycle
  • Designs of the New Ubuntu 10.04 CD boot menu
  • Ubuntu Software Centre- Can't it help finance app development?

Why is Chrome OS going to be successful?

Filed under
Google
  • Why is Chrome OS going to be successful?
  • Google Chrome OS Previewed
  • 11 Chrome Extensions, For Starters

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Alice, where have you been all my life?
  • Building OpenOffice.org with GNU make
  • FUDCon F13: Another SNAFU
  • Gamer completes fairytale: From PlayStation to real-life pro track racing
  • Rwanda: Workforce Authority Joins OLPC Drive
  • Imitation IS The Sincerest Form Of Flattery
  • Linux Outlaws 125 - Voltron's Head
  • Linux Basement: Episode 47 - Alfresco and GDNS
  • Using Your iPod with (K)ubuntu 9.10
  • Legitimate Limitations On Freedom Of Speech
  • Performous Is Like Rock Band for Your Linux PC
  • The Windows 7 License can make you love free software

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Getting Beautiful Fonts in Gentoo Linux
  • How to Install Chrome OS On A USB Stick
  • How To recover Google account Password Via SMS Message
  • GRUB 2 bootloader - Full tutorial
  • Get rid of GNOME “open with” duplicate entries
  • Adding a Terminal Hot Key Shortcut
  • How to : GNOME Shell (Preview of GNOME 3.0) in Fedora 12
  • Securing MySQL in Fedora
  • How to install Dawn of Ubuntu wallpapers in Ubuntu 9.10
  • HowTo Determine Possible Screen Resolutions (Ubuntu)
  • Portage emerge utility
  • Light Weight Ubuntu Kernel
  • Manage the postfix mailqueue with postsuper, postqueue und mailq
  • Create a Custom Transitioning Background for Your Gnome 2.28 Desktop
  • Docky Tip: Change GMail Icon Color with Scroll
  • Install Subversion Repository on Ubuntu Desktop

From the archives: the best graphics tools of 2001

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: With The Gimp not being bundled as standard with Ubuntu 10.04, we thought it was time to get out the shovel, chainsaw and fork-lift truck and do some digging through the archives of the world's best Linux magazine to see how far The Gimp - and its competitors - have come.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.