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Monday, 20 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Open source: dangerous to computing education?

Filed under
OSS

opensource.com: At a time when we are trying to broaden participation in computing, open source development is even more closed and less diverse than commercial software development.

Where has my network gone?

toolbox.com/blogs: While Linux is a very simple and easy to understand operating system it can sometimes be confusing. What? You say. Linux..simple? Easy to understand? What are you on Locutus?

What is wrong with Android

tech-no-media.com: I recently purchased an HTC Magic, my first device running Android, Google's Linux-based mobile operating system. Although there are a lot of things I like about Android, I also quickly realized that there are also a lot of things that either require urgent improvement or are going wrong altogether.

SCALE 8x in Los Angeles This Weekend

Filed under
Linux

SCALE 8x the 2010 Southern California Linux Expo will be returning to Los Angeles for its 8th annual event this coming weekend. SCALE is a community run Linux and open-source conference which will be held February 19-21, 2010 at the LAX Westin.

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Choosing Linux Desktop Environments
  • Morgan Stanley Maintains Red Hat at Equal-Weight
  • Tiny handsets run Android
  • Gitorious or GitHub?
  • Nouveau Interface Breaks, Updates Needed
  • ECS Elitegroup H55H-M
  • Dolphin File Manager
  • Bring on the Fedora skins
  • Lucid Gets New Icons
  • Linux Server Discounts From Lenovo, Red Hat and Tech Data
  • US citizens: Let the USTR know today that you oppose draconian copyright
  • Gnome VLC player gets new name, PPA
  • The Incredible Story of Scott Kveton: Linux, Firefox, Bacon & iPhones
  • MilaX 0.5: OpenSolaris as Live-CD
  • Twitter Loves Open Source And Launches A Directory To Prove It
  • Avoid Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) with Workrave
  • Open source against piracy
  • Open Source Choices
  • dpkg-paranoia - Simple scripts to control installing process
  • Missing Features – Feeling Brian Proffitt’s Pain

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using Linux to back out a Windows XP patch
  • Skype green video on linux?
  • Useful command line little tricks (part 2)
  • Use Live USB Creator to install Fedora 12 from a USB stick
  • Yoper Linux step by step installation instructions
  • Upgrade WordPress Using Subversion and Shell Script
  • Space is being consumed too fast? Find where!
  • How to get useful backtraces almost for free?
  • Why Should You Compile Your Kernel and How
  • Installing KDE 4.4 in Ubuntu, openSUSE, Fedora And ArchLinux
  • Manage TTF fonts with fonty python

Is MeeGo Linux’ Answer to iPad?

linux.com: Three weeks ago, the technology world was aflutter with buzz of the iPad. But with yesterday's MeeGo announcement from Intel, the Linux Foundation and Nokia, it appears that Apple could have a Linux-based competitor for tablets, netbooks and other categories of devices.

Linux Training Week: Software Availability

Filed under
Software

zath.co.uk: One of the biggest issues when moving away from Windows is software availability; what we do on a computer isn’t defined by the operating system, but the third party software we use on that operating system. Because most of the software written for Linux operating systems is open source, it may be difficult to find a replacement for the everyday software that you use on Windows or Mac OS X.

Study: Ages of social network users

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Web

royal.pingdom.com: How old is the average Twitter or Facebook user? What about all the other social network sites out there, like MySpace, LinkedIn, and so on? How is age distributed across the millions and millions of social network users out there?

What happens to Sun's open-source software now?

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld.com: The deal is done. Oracle now owns Sun. Oracle's main message to Sun's customers seems to be "Don't worry, be happy." That's not easy when Oracle is not explaining in any detail what it will be doing with open-source software offerings like MySQL, OpenOffice, and OpenSolaris.

Also: Linux MySQL distros meeting in Brussels

Five useful KDE 4.4 widgets

Filed under
KDE

ghacks.net: With the rise of KDE 4.4 comes a new crop of desktop widgets (or Plasmoids). Earlier renditions of KDE 4.x saw the Plasmoids less than useful. The latest workings, however, have become quite useful, productive even.

Celebrate Presidents Day with SimplyMEPIS 8.5 beta5

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: MEPIS has announced SimplyMEPIS 8.4.97, the fifth beta of MEPIS 8.5, now available from MEPIS and public mirrors. We have kernel 2.6.32.8, KDE 4.3.4, gtk 2.18.3-1, OpenOffice 3.1.1-12, Firefox 3.5.6-2, and K3b 1.70.0-b1.

10 Cool Firefox Add-Ons

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF

linuxplanet.com: This is a must-read for Firefox fans! We'll review 10 cool add-ons that will make your cross-platform Mozilla web browser even better. We'll review add-ons to help fix annoyances, save time, discover advanced functionality, and stay connected.

Ubuntu single sign on service launched

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

blog.canonical.com: We are pleased to announce the launch of the brand new Ubuntu single sign on service. The goal of this service is to provide a single, central login service for all Ubuntu-related sites, thus making it more convenient for Ubuntu users and community members.

Linux desktops: you say no

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: The bottom line? It's a lot easier to roll out Linux desktops to users who only do one thing, known in the trade as transaction workers, and for professional workers. And attitudes are swinging in favour of Linux -- but it's no longer just a technological so much as a cultural and financial decision.

Aava Mobile unveils world’s first fully open mobile device

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

slashgear.com: Android is open, but the hardware that runs it is not. There are hardly any open source hardware or mobile devices in the market. With the MWC in full swing, Aava Mobile has unveiled what is supposed to be the first fully open mobile device.

5 New Things about Windows 8 and Ubuntu 10.04

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

linuxtree.blogspot: We all know that Canonical and Microsoft are going to launch there products in few months , So i thought of writing a post about new products Windows 8 and Ubuntu 10.04

8 Of The Best Linux Dockapps

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: How much functionality can you pack into a 64×64 square? That’s the basic question behind many dockapps – utilities that can be run on the “dock” of many popular desktop environments.

Lubuntu: Not Just for Lusers

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: For a long time, the Ubuntu family has had three members–Ubuntu, Kubuntu and Xubuntu. But that may change, with a new project, Lubuntu, vying for official endorsement by Canonical. Here’s a look at Lubuntu, and thoughts on what its future may hold.

The Linux Box to Market Ubuntu to U.S. Enterprise Users

Filed under
Linux

ANN ARBOR, Mich., February 16, 2010 – One of the most rapidly growing and popular operating systems, Ubuntu, is taking a significant run at the U.S.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • [LabPlot] Improved data fitting in 2.5
    Until now, the fit parameters could in principle take any values allowed by the fit model, which would lead to a reasonable description of the data. However, sometimes the realistic regions for the parameters are known in advance and it is desirable to set some mathematical constrains on them. LabPlot provides now the possibility to define lower and/or upper bounds for the fit parameters and to limit the internal fit algorithm to these regions only.
  • [GNOME] Maps Towards 3.28
    Some work has been done since the release of 3.26 in September. On the visual side we have adapted the routing sidebar to use a similar styling as is used in Files (Nautilus) and the GTK+ filechooser.
  • MX 17 Beta 2
  • MiniDebconf in Toulouse
    I attended the MiniDebconf in Toulouse, which was hosted in the larger Capitole du Libre, a free software event with talks, presentation of associations, and a keysigning party. I didn't expect the event to be that big, and I was very impressed by its organization. Cheers to all the volunteers, it has been an amazing week-end!
  • DebConf Videoteam sprint report - day 0
    First day of the videoteam autumn sprint! Well, I say first day, but in reality it's more day 0. Even though most of us have arrived in Cambridge already, we are still missing a few people. Last year we decided to sprint in Paris because most of our video gear is stocked there. This year, we instead chose to sprint a few days before the Cambridge Mini-Debconf to help record the conference afterwards.
  • Libre Computer Board Launches Another Allwinner/Mali ARM SBC
    The Tritium is a new ARM single board computer from the Libre Computer Board project. Earlier this year the first Libre Computer Board launched as the Le Potato for trying to be a libre and free software minded ARM SBC. That board offered better specs than the Raspberry Pi 3 and aimed to be "open" though not fully due to the ARM Mali graphics not being open.
  • FOSDEM 2018 Will Be Hosting A Wayland / Mesa / Mir / X.Org Developer Room
    This year at the FOSDEM open-source/Linux event in Brussels there wasn't the usual "X.Org dev room" as it's long been referred to, but for 2018, Luc Verhaegen is stepping back up to the plate and organizing this mini graphics/X.Org developer event within FOSDEM.
  • The Social Network™ releases its data networking code
    Facebook has sent another shiver running up Cisco's spine, by releasing the code it uses for packet routing. Open/R, its now-open source routing platform, runs Facebook's backbone and data centre networks. The Social Network™ first promised to release the platform in May 2017. In the post that announced the release, Facebook said it began developing Open/R for its Terragraph wireless system, but since applied it to its global fibre network, adding: “we are even starting to roll it out into our data center fabrics, running inside FBOSS and on our Open Compute Project networking hardware like Wedge 100.”
  • Intel Icelake Support Added To LLVM Clang
    Initial support for Intel's Icelake microarchitecture that's a follow-on to Cannonlake has been added to the LLVM/Clang compiler stack. Last week came the Icelake patch to GCC and now Clang has landed its initial Icelake enablement too.
  • Microsoft's Surface Book 2 has a power problem
     

    Microsoft’s Surface Book 2 has a power problem. When operating at peak performance, it may draw more power than its stock charger or Surface Dock can handle. What we’ve discovered after talking to Microsoft is that it’s not a bug—it’s a feature.

Kernel: Linux 4.15 and Intel

  • The Big Changes So Far For The Linux 4.15 Kernel - Half Million New Lines Of Code So Far
    We are now through week one of two for the merge window of the Linux 4.15 kernel. If you are behind on your Phoronix reading with the many feature recaps provided this week of the different pull requests, here's a quick recap of the changes so far to be found with Linux 4.15:
  • Intel 2017Q3 Graphics Stack Recipe Released
    Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has put out their quarterly Linux graphics driver stack upgrade in what they are calling the latest recipe. As is the case with the open-source graphics drivers just being one centralized, universal component to be easily installed everywhere, their graphics stack recipe is just the picked versions of all the source components making up their driver.
  • Intel Ironlake Receives Patches For RC6 Power Savings
    Intel Ironlake "Gen 5" graphics have been around for seven years now since being found in Clarkdale and Arrandale processors while finally now the patches are all worked out for enabling RC6 power-savings support under Linux.

Red Hat: OpenStack and Financial News

Security: Google and Morgan Marquis-Boire

  • Google: 25 per cent of black market passwords can access accounts

    The researchers used Google's proprietary data to see whether or not stolen passwords could be used to gain access to user accounts, and found that an estimated 25 per cent of the stolen credentials can successfully be used by cyber crooks to gain access to functioning Google accounts.

  • Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials

    Drawing upon Google as a case study, we find 7--25\% of exposed passwords match a victim's Google account.

  • Infosec star accused of sexual assault booted from professional affiliations
    A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault. On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire's home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years. A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym "Lila," provided The Verge with "both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia."