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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 26 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Nexus 6 on Ubuntu rather than Android L Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 6:08pm
Story Pico-ITX SBC runs Android 4.4 on Snapdragon 805 Rianne Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 6:04pm
Story Why Python 4.0 won't be like Python 3.0 Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 5:25pm
Story EXT4/Btrfs/XFS/F2FS Benchmarks On Linux 3.17 Rianne Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 5:07pm
Story Samsung Gear S smartwatch coming to four American carriers this fall Rianne Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 5:04pm
Story Fedora 21 Workstation: GNOME 3. KDE and Anaconda screenshots Rianne Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 4:48pm
Story Manjaro Linux 0.8.10 Ascella OpenBox Edition : Video Review and Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 4:45pm
Story GNOME 3.14 Released Rianne Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 4:44pm
Story Best Dialer and Address Book Replacement Apps for Android Rianne Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 4:37pm
Story Share your genetic story with openSNP Rianne Schestowitz 24/09/2014 - 3:01pm

NVIDIA Releases 185.18.14 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: NVIDIA hasn't released as many Linux driver updates in May as they have in past months, but this week they are out with the NVIDIA 185.18.14 driver update.

Linux on tap in netbook, nettop

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

desktoplinux.com: HP has upgraded its Linux-ready "Mini" netbooks, offering its new "HP Mini 110 with Mi" at a much lower $280 pricetag than the previous Mini 1000.

Recession and the Victory of FOSS

Filed under
OSS

raiden.net: I find it rather intriguing to realize that for years we of the FOSS community have fought against closed source, locked in, proprietary software, and even hardware, services, DRM and so much more, and yet seemed to get little of anywhere.

Testing Out The SSD Mode In Btrfs

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: One month ago we provided benchmarks of the Btrfs file-system and found that while it contained many features to make it a next-generation Linux file-system, its disk performance was rather displeasing. In Btrfs there the solid-state drive mode can be enabled.

Ubuntu 9.10 Goals And Disappointments

Filed under
Ubuntu

anotherubuntu.blogspot: There is plenty of stuff to get excited about in the comming release of Ubuntu, Karmic Koala. What has been confirmed is:

Linux Gadgets

Filed under
Hardware

blogs.fsfe.org: Linux gadgets. What’s not to like? vanRijn likes the Palm Pre, or would like it if it was available already. Me, I think my main desktop sync desire right now is my Nokia 6300 phone.

True cost of migrating to open source

Filed under
OSS

zdnetasia.com: I was hugely entertained by the latest piece of Microsoft spin: apparently the recession is putting a dampener on migrations to open source.

Tiny 1% Linux = Big Microsoft Terror

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

blog.linuxtoday.com: I don't believe that the desktop Linux market share is barely 1%. I think it is a lot higher. There is something else that is even more persuasive, and that is how Microsoft behaves. If Linux is so insignificant, why do they pay so much attention to it?

SourceForge scoops up Ohloh

Filed under
Software
Web

blogs.the451group: SourceForge, the venerable open source repository and vendor, just got a shot in the arm by agreeing to acquire the newer, more social networking-minded Ohloh for an undisclosed amount.

The Ext4 Linux file system

Filed under
Software
HowTos

h-online.com: Ext3, the default Linux file system for many years, is definitely starting to show its age. Modern mass storage devices are approaching its limits and block-based data management is no longer adequate for modern file sizes. High time for an update!

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • kde4 for netbooks

  • Features Of Ubuntu 9.04
  • Firefox Addon: Nuke Everything
  • Business Card Tutorial in Inkscape.org
  • Portable Ubuntu: Definitely a keeper
  • DC: First quarter worst for servers in 12 years
  • Meet Snowy, Tomboy’s best friend
  • X Input 2.0 Hitting Master In Seven Days
  • Does scons outperforms autoconf and makefiles?
  • GiftWrap helps you create .debs
  • Google Waves Goodbye to E-Mail, Welcomes Real-Time
  • Google Wave: Screenshots
  • If open source has won, then where do we go from here?
  • GNU/Linux Eclipses Windows – for Eclipse Users
  • New Firefox Icon: Iteration 10
  • Update on sharing documents
  • Hedgewars 0.9.11

Top 10 Apps that Boosts Ubuntu’s User Experience

Filed under
Software

programmerfish.com: Ubuntu Tweak allows changing all the itsy-bitsy pieces of Ubuntu desktop OS. It is the equivalent of TweakUI for Windows. You can achieve the same results by using the gconf-editor tool in Ubuntu.

The MIPS Processor and the $150 Linux Netbook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

oreilly.com: Last week I wrote about two different projections claiming that Linux will recapture 50% of the netbook market, either in three years or by next year. Compelling MIPS and ARM based systems are the reason.

Qt vs. GTK: Konqueror, Arora, Firefox, Midori, Epiphany

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: I’ve mentioned a couple of times that, at least in my opinion, KDE is losing out to GNOME because there simply aren’t as many Qt applications as GTK ones. This is the second in a series of articles comparing different kind of applications.

Dreamlinux 4.0 Gnome - Sneak Peak

Filed under
Linux

richs-lxh.linux-hardcore: We are currently playing with a new base (DL-4.0), new kernel (.29-3) new modules, and nelsongs´ new distro building and module creation scripts. We got our hands on nelsongs’ preliminary Gnome desktop modules to play with on the new base and kernel.

Use Agave to create color schemes

Filed under
HowTos

ghacks.net: If you do any web design, interior design, painting, graphic arts you know the importance of using complimentary color schemes. For many this is as simple as eying a color. Agave does one thing: It helps you create color schemes that match.

Fedora 11's best five features

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: Fedora, Red Hat's community Linux's arrival has been delayed until early next week, June 2, but the release candidate is already looking mighty darn good.

It’s Time For Change: Part I

Filed under
Linux
OSS

jonreagan.wordpress: The Linux community can always be a better place. I have always pictured the “perfect” Linux community as one that is helpful and kind to others, nonexclusive, professional (not in the sense of business formality) and free of bureaucracy. I have doubts to whether that will ever happen.

RumorMill: Amazon to Open Source Web Services API's

Filed under
Software

ulitzer.com: Word is Amazon's legal team is currently "investigating" open sourcing their various web services API's including EC2, S3 etc. If true, this move makes a lot of sense for a number of reasons.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Top 4 CDN services for hosting open source libraries
    A CDN, or content delivery network, is a network of strategically placed servers located around the world used for the purpose of delivering files faster to users. A traditional CDN will allow you to accelerate your website's images, CSS files, JS files, and any other piece of static content. This allows website owners to accelerate all of their own content as well as provide them with additional features and configuration options. These premium services typically require payment based on the amount of bandwidth a project uses. However, if your project doesn't justify the cost of implementing a traditional CDN, the use of an open source CDN may be more suitable. Typically, these types of CDNs allow you to link to popular web-based libraries (CSS/JS frameworks, for example), which are then delivered to your web visitors from the free CDN's servers. Although CDN services for open source libraries do not allow you to upload your own content to their servers, they can help you accelerate libraries globally and improve your website's redundancy.
  • Users stand up, speak out, and deliver data on OpenStack growth
    Last week, the OpenStack Foundation announced the results of its ninth user survey. OpenStack users responded in record-breaking numbers to participate, and their voices as revealed in the data tell the real story of OpenStack. The OpenStack community is growing, thriving with new users, deployments, code contributions, and collaborations, all on the rise. User diversity is expanding across geographies and organizational sizes. And OpenStack's ability to integrate with innovative technologies is paving the way for advancements not even dreamed of just five years ago.
  • How to get started learning to program

Huawei, Google supercharge Android with new Raspberry Pi-like board

Prepare to run Android at blazing fast speeds on a new Raspberry Pi-like computer developed by Huawei. Huawei's HiKey 960 computer board is priced at US$239 but has some of the latest CPU and GPU technologies. Google, ARM, Huawei, Archermind, and LeMaker all played roles in developing the board. The HiKey 960 is meant to be a go-to PC for Android or a tool to develop software and drivers for the OS. The board development was backed by Linaro, an organization that develops software packages for the Android OS and ARM architecture. Read more

Debian Derivatives: Q4OS and Devuan

  • Debian-Based Q4OS 1.8.4 Operating System Lets Users Select Alternative Desktops
    Today, April 26, 2017, the developers behind the Debian-based Q4OS GNU/Linux distribution announced the release of the fourth stability and security update of the Q4OS 1.8 "Orion" series. Q4OS 1.8.4 comes almost two months after the release of the previous point release, and besides incorporating all the security patches backported from the upstream repositories of the Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system series, it adds an exciting new feature, namely the integration of alternative desktop environments.
  • Which is Free, Which is Open … [Also]

    Devuan and Debian need not defer to the Open Source Initiative regarding what is Open Source, since the OSI is just using Debian's Free Software Guidelines. Debian's Free Software Guidelines are a definition of Free Software, not specifically Open Source. At the time they were created, RMS personally approved of them as "a good definition of Free Software".

Leftovers: Software

  • Luminance HDR 2.5.0 Released, Here’s How to Install it on Ubuntu
    Luminance HDR is an open-source tool that lets you create and edit high-dynamic-range images (HDR) on Linux, Windows and macOS. The app recently got its first major update in several years and I figured it was something a few of you might wanna know about (and hey, we’ve featured a couple of other photography tools recently).
  • SMPlayer 17.4.2 Open-Source Media Player Supports MPlayer's ffhevcvdpau Decoder
    A new stable update of the open-source and cross-platform SMPlayer media player was announced recently, versioned 17.4.2, for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows. SMPlayer 17.4.2 is now the latest stable release of the popular media player applications, and it looks like it ships with various exciting improvements and new features. One of these is support for using the ffhevcvdpau decoder from the MPlayer project, but only on Linux-based operating systems.
  • Gyazo – An Easy Way to Capture Screenshots, GIFs and Save Websites
    Gyazo is a screen capturing application with which you can quickly take quality shots of your screen and also create GIFs on the fly with a simple click. It is as simple to use as another screen capture tool we wrote on earlier, Peek, but Gyazo seems to have an edge in terms of functionality, customizability, and extension; at least, for now.
  • The many ways of running firefox on OpenBSD

    Maybe i haven't talked about it enough on the lists, but since i've been maintaining the various mozillas in the portstree (cvs log says i started around firefox 3.6.something... 7 years ago. *sigh*) a lot of things changed, so i wanted take the 6.1 release as an occasion to sum up the various ways one could run which version of which firefox on which version of OpenBSD.