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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story An Everyday Linux User Review Of Fedora 21 Rianne Schestowitz 08/03/2015 - 11:41pm
Story Google hires engineers to run Android OS on virtual reality gear – report Rianne Schestowitz 08/03/2015 - 11:27pm
Story GNOME 2 is back: Ubuntu MATE is now an official flavor Rianne Schestowitz 08/03/2015 - 11:20pm
Story A Closer Look At Canonical’s Ubuntu Phones Rianne Schestowitz 08/03/2015 - 11:17pm
Story Jolla’s Sailfish OS Spotted Running on the OnePlus One Rianne Schestowitz 07/03/2015 - 4:32am
Story 10 best uses for open source software in the business world Rianne Schestowitz 07/03/2015 - 4:14am
Story The Year of the Linux Smart Phone Rianne Schestowitz 07/03/2015 - 3:32am
Story Ubuntu Linux 15.04 Vivid Vervet Beta Mate Flavor Rianne Schestowitz 07/03/2015 - 12:12am
Story Valve Is Showing That Steam Is Finally Shaking Off the Windows Dependency Rianne Schestowitz 07/03/2015 - 12:07am
Story Raspberry Pi 2 review Rianne Schestowitz 06/03/2015 - 11:55pm

Top 7 Must See Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

Here is a list of top 7 linux distributions to choose from, all compared and reviewed.

The Perfect Server - Fedora 12 x86_64

Filed under
HowTos

This is a detailed description about how to set up a Fedora 12 server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable) with PHP5/Ruby/Python, Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc. This tutorial is written for the 64-bit version of Fedora 12, but should apply to the 32-bit version with very little modifications as well. In the end you should have a system that works reliably, and if you like you can install the free webhosting control panel ISPConfig (i.e., ISPConfig runs on it out of the box).

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • kde-testing overlay *renamed* – qt and kde status in gentoo
  • The sorry state of Python in Debian
  • BBC using Drupal
  • Radeon DRM Driver Gets New Branches
  • GCC 4.5 Steps Closer To Release
  • linux DVD backup tools
  • Tribulations of a packager (2)
  • What Journalists Can Learn From the FOSS Community
  • DeviceKit-disks Renames Itself To UDisks
  • My Story of Mercurial and Subversion
  • 12 Indispensable Web Design Apps for Ubuntu
  • Command Line Software Management
  • Adobe Flash Player 10 for 64-bit Linux coming Dec 8
  • Open Source Tweeting
  • The Linux Gazette Needs You
  • Chromium: Why it isn't in Fedora yet as a proper package
  • Linux Outlaws 124 - Coughffice
  • FLOSS Weekly 97: eXist-db

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Crack copy protected PDFs using two simple commands in Ubuntu
  • Guide: Debian LAMP Server Setup
  • Exploring Drupal
  • 5 essential Ubuntu optimization tips for newbies
  • Howto switch from Ubuntu to Debian – My Experience – Part II
  • Download youtube video in ubuntu / Debian using UTube Ripper
  • Download PGP Keys with Apt-key
  • How to Automatic and timed login in Fedora 12
  • checkinstall - Smartly manage your installations
  • Keep track of your consulting times and invoicing with GnoTime
  • Disk Space Eaters in Linux
  • Understanding NIC Bonding with Linux
  • Modify Mandriva Bootsplash
  • Getting the most from bug mail

KDE Plasma netbook interface demoed on Asus Eee 1005Ha

Filed under
KDE

liliputing.com: At times I’ve felt like KDE 4 is a little bit on the sluggish side on my desktop PCs. On a netbook’s Atom processor? I wouldn’t even have considered switching from Gnome if I hadn’t seen this video on YouTube.

Also: Video: The Fox TV Series "Lie to Me" uses KDE

10 Linux features Windows should have by default

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

blogs.techrepublic.com: The Linux and Windows camps may be polarized, but Jack Wallen believes each OS could be improved by borrowing from the other. This week, he looks at how certain Linux features could benefit Windows.

The X.Org Plans For Moving Away From HAL

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: To address the questions that have been coming up frequently regarding the X.Org Server and the plans to stop using HAL, Sun's Alan Coopersmith has created a new Wiki page called XorgHAL.

A Linux answer to Windows SBS: ClearOS

Filed under
Linux

itworld.com: Linux is used as a server all the time. From branch-offices using Linux and Samba to Google running, well everything, on Linux, it's the operating system for choice for most businesses. Except that is, for small offices. There, Microsoft's SBS (Small Business Server) is the server of choice. The Clear Foundation wants to change that with their ClearOS 5.1 small business server distribution.

Open Source: An 'Advertisement On Steroids

informationweek.com: That's one of the many analogies and observations drawn by Vyatta CEO Kelly Herrell in a blog post about the economics of open source. The open source business model is tremendously effective, in his eyes -- it's just that its effects are not always measured in dollar values, and that can drive the money men crazy.

What to do with that old computer?

stormyscorner.com: If it has at least 256MB or 512MB of RAM (or could have, if you bought more memory), there are a number of things you could do with it.

Linux Pranks

linuxers.org: long long time ago, back when linux was getting powerful, there was a boy who started using it. He liked it so much that he would spend all the day learning and exploring. That was when his friends started calling him a dumb geek. So, he decided to teach those losers a lesson.

Kdenlive

Filed under
KDE
Software

notmart.org: For the last screencasts I had to do, I needed some tool were it's easy to cut little pieces of various short movie files and that could have let me to reassemble them together, maybe with some simple not too heavy transition effects.

When not to script it

Filed under
Linux
Software

thelinuxblog.com: I’ve come across a number of programs in the past and thought to myself, “Why didn’t they script this, it would be so much easier.”

Ubuntu System Panel: Simple? Is it heck…

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: Ubuntu System Panel is a panel applet designed to simplify launching, managing and just generally using your Ubuntu system.

Linux and the sheer utter misery of viruses

Filed under
Linux
Security

computerworlduk.com: In our cosy *nix world we don't suffer from viruses, or rather we didn't. But thanks to an amazing piece of reverse engineering we have SAMBA. What this means is that we can have viruses by proxy if any Linux network we deploy has Windows workstations...

Why Red Hat doesn't see CentOS as a Linux rival

Filed under
Linux

blog.internetnews.com: "We are not actively chasing users of CentOS, but rather find that enterprises are naturally turning to Red Hat for the value of the Red Hat subscription model and support," Bill-Peter said.

UNIX turns 40 - Why is it still thriving?

Filed under
OS

The systems world will shortly be celebrating a major anniversary milestone. UNIX is turning 40 years old! Most of us know the story of how UNIX was born, but what about why? Was it born strictly because its founders wanted to play a computer game on a different platform? And why does UNIX continue to thrive 15 years after an (in)famous Byte Magazine article that asked: Is UNIX dead?

Essential tips and tricks for the Emacs editing environment

Filed under
Linux

Learn everything you ever wanted to know about Emacs and then some

Automatically Download All The National Geographic Wallpapers With A Bash Script

Filed under
Linux

I have created 2 very simple bash scripts which automatically download all the wallpapers from the 2008 and 2009 wallpaper contests - almost 500 beautiful wallpapers you can use in your favourite wallpaper changer application (or script).

Review: Linux Mint

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: Normally, I don't really fancy Ubuntu based distros, as most of them are nothing more than custom / remastered versions of the original Ubuntu. However, Linux Mint has really broken the tradition of poorly made custom respins.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.