Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 04 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Five Things in Fedora This Week (2014-04-08) Rianne Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 1:38pm
Story Fedora 21 Might Include GNOME 3.14 Rianne Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 1:24pm
Story The Internet's 25 years and future with open source Roy Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 9:03am
Story Reiser4: Different Transaction Models Rianne Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 8:12am
Story Torvalds Is Unconvined By LTO'ing A Linux Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 7:58am
Story Windows XP Alternatives: Six Linux Distros to Replace Microsoft's Ageing OS Roy Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 7:41am
Story National Geospatial Intelligence Agency releases open source code on GitHub Roy Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 1:42am
Story New KMyMoney website Roy Schestowitz 09/04/2014 - 12:36am
Story Netrunner Rolling Release: First Snapshot 2014.04 released Roy Schestowitz 08/04/2014 - 9:12pm
Story Raspberry Pi morphs into $30 SODIMM-style COM Rianne Schestowitz 08/04/2014 - 9:06pm

openSUSE 11.1 countdown

Filed under
SUSE

dev-loki.blogspot: The openSUSE release countdown banners have been updated, with new languages (pt_BR, hu, id, bg, jp and wa) as well as counting down to 11.1. And as it is rendered on the server, it always points to the right number of remaining days before 11.1 release.

More Work On Red Hat's Wayland Project

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Since publishing the world's first look at Wayland, a nano display server for Linux with an integrated compositing manager, there has been much interest in this emerging Red Hat project. While this project is still in its infancy, below are a few more notes about recent changes with Wayland.

Will Linux ever be a mainstream desktop play?

Filed under
Linux

cnet.com: I strongly suspect that there are inherent tradeoffs between the flexibility and choice associated with open source and the unified approach (epitomized by Apple) that tends to be associated with good user interface design. But the bigger issue with mainstreaming the Linux PC has nothing to do with design and everything with where we are in technology history.

No More Doom And Gloom, Please

Filed under
Linux

linuxcanuck.wordpress: It seems that more and more bloggers are writing doom and gloom articles or attention grabbing headlines to that effect. Recently one blogger has taken it upon himself to write about the virtues of Windows 7 and make pronouncements that it will kill Linux on netbooks and “instant on” computers. Others write that the success of Ubuntu will kill other distros and poses a threat to Linux as a whole. I say, enough already.

Why Linux sucks at being user friendly

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Forget the OS wars, Apple and Microsoft do not need to wield any weapons today. Linux seems to be doing a good enough job of shooting itself in the foot when it comes to appealing to your average PC user.

Mac OS X 10.5 vs. Ubuntu 8.10 Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Last week we published Ubuntu 7.04 to 8.10 benchmarks from a Lenovo ThinkPad T60 and had found Ubuntu's performance degraded peculiarly over the past year and a half. This time around we're switching out the hardware we're testing on to Intel's newer Core 2 series and we're comparing the performance of the x86 and x86_64 editions of Ubuntu 8.10 against Apple's Mac OS X 10.5.5.

The Future of Gnome

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: Neil Patel of Canonical recently posted an outline of the new user interface concepts that Gnome developers envisioned during the “Gnome User Experience” conference in Boston a couple of weeks ago. But are the concepts a good move?

What Linux Needs to Stay Competitive

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: For some time, Windows Vista’s perceived failure has given Linux a free ride. It has been nice, but it will not remain. From the looks of things, Windows 7 will be a solid release. With this competition, what does Linux need to stay competitive?

Five Tweaks for Your New Ubuntu Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

lifehacker.com: With the recent release of the popular Linux distro Ubuntu's 8.10 version, code-named Intrepid Ibex, we've recently detailed some productive-minded Ubuntu Kung Fu, as well as a user-minded tour through 8.10. This morning, though, we're taking a more nuts-and-bolts look at changes you can make to your newly-installed system to make it faster, reliable, and more enjoyable.

The new openSUSE community-elected board speaks

Filed under
SUSE

linux.com: The openSUSE project has a new board, and the new board has big plans. The distribution's first board was appointed by Novell in November 2007, tasked with the unusual job of "bootstrapping" a community-elected board that could guide the project with a balance of Novell and non-Novell influence.

Using IPv6 On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how you can configure a Debian Etch system for IPv6 so that a) it can connect to other IPv6 hosts and Cool other IPv6 hosts can connect to it. IPv6 should become more important in the future as recent estimates assume that there will be no more IPv4 addresses left by 2010 or 2011.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Open source as a strategic competitive weapon

  • How Can I Sync My Firefox Installations?
  • Creating a user-centric site in Drupal
  • KDEGames review day invitation
  • ApacheCon keynotes streamed for free
  • Why Use Linux?
  • Top 3 Mozilla Firefox 4 Features For Next Generation Browsing Experience
  • Tree now closed for Firefox 3.1 Beta 2 “slushy freeze”
  • Open Source is /screwed/
  • OASIS Forms Committee to Advance ODF Applications
  • Open source valuations remain birdseed
  • Metro 1.1 Custom Builds
  • Red Hat Puts On Fedora #10
  • Free Linux Sticker Book For Your Laptop/Desktop
  • Microsoft haters, Mac daddies, and Linux Lovers
  • Delivery problems with Pandora Game Console
  • Bash: Preserving Whitespace Using set and eval
  • Linux boom?
  • Smart updated with more urpmi functionality implemented
  • The Fall of the Gentoo Wiki
  • Remastersys - Create custom Ubuntu (live) CD
  • Linus on his healthy lifestyle

some ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Hangs on Initial Test Run

  • Latest ubuntu failure: wifi
  • Intrepid Ibex lays claim to the Black Tower
  • Ubuntu Linux’s 8 Million Users
  • How to Disable The PC (internal/system) Speaker in Ubuntu

Novell lays off employees in Europe

Filed under
SUSE

cnet.com: Novell laid off employees close to its SUSE home in Germany and Austria shutting sales offices in Vienna, Munich, and Berlin. The number of employees laid off has not yet been made public.

10 Linux desktops you shouldn’t overlook

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: If you know Linux, you know there are tons of options on every level. To some, this might seem overwhelming at first. To others, it’s all about possibility. But for a lot of users, desktop selection doesn’t usually go beyond KDE or GNOME. With this article, I hope to help the average Linux user get beyond the standard fare.

KDE 4.1.3 Codename "Change" Released

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: The KDE Community today announced the immediate availability of "Change" (also known as KDE 4.1.3), another bugfix and maintenance update for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop. Change is a monthly update to KDE 4.1.

First GNOME 2.26 Development Packages Arrive

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: The first development release in the GNOME 2.25 series that will go on to form GNOME 2.26 early next year is expected to be released today. There's still two months before any freezes go into effect for GNOME 2.26, but a few changes worth mentioning can be found in the handful of packages checked in today.

Improvements in GNOME 2.24 and Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

bizarrelinux.blogspot: It'll be really hard for me to keep track which feature was done by which, so I'll post GNOME 2.24 and Ubuntu 8.10 as one.

Remote buffer overflow bug bites Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux
Security

blogs.zdnet: A remote buffer overflow vulnerability in the Linux Kernel could be exploited by attackers to execute code or cripple affected systems, according to a Gentoo bug report that just became public.

Michael Crichton, million-selling science-fiction author, dies at 66

Filed under
SciFi
Obits

latimes.com: Best-selling author Michael Crichton, who wrote such novels as "The Andromeda Strain" and "Jurassic Park," and created the popular TV drama "ER," has died at 66, his family said today.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Hyper Is a Terminal Emulator Built Using Web Technologies
    A lot of us use the terminal on Ubuntu, typically from an app like GNOME Terminal, Xterm or an app like Guake. But did you know that there’s an JS/HTML/CSS Terminal? It’s called Hyper (formerly/also known as HyperTerm, though it has no relation to the Windows terminal of the same/similar name) and, usefulness aside, it’s certainl a novel proof-of-concept. “The goal of the project,” according to the official website, “is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards.”
  • Little Kids Having Fun With “Terminal Train” In Ubuntu Linux
    Linux is often stereotyped as the operating system for tech savvy users and developers. However, there are some fun Linux commands that one can use in spare time. A small utility named sl can be installed in Linux to play with the Terminal Train.
  • This Cool 8-Bit Desktop Wallpaper Changes Throughout The Day
    Do you want a dynamic desktop wallpaper that changes throughout the day and looks like the sort of environment you’d be able to catchPokemon in? If so, check out Bit Day wallpapers. Created by Redditor user ~BloodyMarvelous, Bit Day is a collection of 12 high-resolution pixel art wallpapers.
  • This Script Sets Wallpapers from Imgur As Your Desktop Background
    Pyckground is a simple python script that can fetch a new desktop background on the Cinnamon desktop from any Imgur gallery you want. I came across it while doing a bit of background on the Bit Day wallpaper pack, and though it was nifty enough to be of use to some of you. So how does it work?
  • Productivity++
    In keeping with tradition of LTS aftermaths, the upcoming Plasma 5.9 release – the next feature release after our first Long Term Support Edition – will be packed with lots of goodies to help you get even more productive with Plasma!
  • Core Apps Hackfest 2016: report
    I spent last weekend at the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. The agenda was to work on GNOME’s core applications: Documents, Files, Music, Photos, Videos, Usage, etc.; to raise their overall standard and to make them push beyond the limits of the framework. There were 19 of us and among us we covered a wide range of modules and areas of expertise. I spent most of my time on the plumbing necessary for Documents and Photos to use GtkFlowBox and GtkListBox. The innards of Photos had already been overhauled to reduce its dependency on GtkTreeModel. Going into the hackfest we were sorely lacking a widget that had all the bells and whistles we need — the idiomatic GNOME 3 selection mode, and seamlessly switching between a list and grid view. So, this is where I decided to focus my energy. As a result, we now have a work-in-progress GdMainBox widget in libgd to replace the old GtkIconView/GtkTreeView-based GdMainView.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Did Amazon Just Kill Open Source?
    Back in the days, we used to focus on creating modular architectures. We had standard wire protocols like NFS, RPC, etc. and standard API layers like BSD, POSIX, etc. Those were fun days. You could buy products from different vendors, they actually worked well together and were interchangeable. There were always open source implementations of the standard, but people could also build commercial variations to extend functionality or durability. The most successful open source project is Linux. We tend to forget it has very strict APIs and layers. New kernel implementations must often be backed by official standards (USB, SCSI…). Open source and commercial implementations live happily side by side in Linux. If we contrast Linux with the state of open source today, we see so many implementations which overlap. Take the big data eco-systems as an example: in most cases there are no standard APIs, or layers, not to mention standard wire protocols. Projects are not interchangeable, causing a much worse lock-in than when using commercial products which conform to a common standard.
  • Firebird 3 by default in LibreOffice 5.4 (Base)
    Lots of missing features & big bugs were fixed recently . All of the blockers that were initially mentioned on tracking bug are now fixed.
  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Comma.ai, Patches For Firefox and Tor, And OSS-Fuzz
  • Open Source Malaria helps students with proof of concept toxoplasmosis pill
    A team of Australian student researchers at Sydney Grammar School has managed to recreate the formula for Daraprim, the drug made (in)famous by the actions of Turing Pharmaceuticals last year when it increased the price substantially per pill. According to Futurism, the undertaking was helped along by an, “online research-sharing platform called Open Source Malaria [OSM], which aims to use publicly available drugs and medical techniques to treat malaria.” The students’ pill passed a battery of tests for purity, and ultimately cost $2 using different, more readily available components. It shows the potential of the platform, which has said elsewhere there is, “enormous potential to crowdsource new potential medicines efficiently.” Although Daraprim is already around, that it could be synthesized relatively easily without the same materials as usual is a good sign for OSM.
  • Growing the Duke University eNable chapter
    We started the Duke University eNable chapter with the simple mission of providing amputees in the Durham area of North Carolina with alternative prostheses, free of cost. Our chapter is a completely student-run organization that aims to connect amputees with 3D printed prosthetic devices. We are partnered with the Enable Community Foundation (ECF), a non-profit prosthetics organization that works with prosthetists to design and fit 3D printed prosthetic devices on amputees who are in underserved communities. As an official ECF University Chapter, we represent the organization in recipient outreach, and utilize their open sourced designs for prosthetic devices.

today's howtos