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Saturday, 21 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story How to Kill Linux: A Tutorial for Microsoft Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2015 - 9:43pm
Story Debian Project Aims to Keep the CIA Off Our Computers Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2015 - 7:47pm
Story Samsung begins assembly of Samsung Z3 Smartphone in India Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2015 - 7:43pm
Story Swiss checklist to procuring open source Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2015 - 7:41pm
Story Finding Linux & FOSS Where You Least Expect It Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2015 - 7:38pm
Story Ubuntu Phone Aquaris E4.5 And E5 Launched In India, Available On Sale At Snapdeal Mohd Sohail 14/09/2015 - 9:02am
Story Weekend in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2015 - 7:42am
Story Minimal Linux Live Is Now Based on Linux Kernel 4.1.6 LTS and BusyBox 1.23.2 Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2015 - 6:10am
Story Linux Kernel 3.14.52, Linux kernel 4.1.7 Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2015 - 6:08am
Story GhostBSD 10.1 Finally Available Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2015 - 6:02am

LinuxUsers Kernel Column #91

Filed under
Linux

linuxuser.co.uk: In this months kernel column John Masters discusses another eventful kernel cycle, not to mention the latest round of Linus Torvald (justified?) rants, the Kernel Summit 2010 and some pretty intense penguin-on-penguin action…

Behind KDE: Meet David Solbach, the "Unknown SysAdmin"

Filed under
KDE

kdenews.org: In this week's Behind KDE interview, we talk with one of the unknown powers behind the sysadmin team, David Solbach. David is the maintainer of reviewboard.kde.org. However, there's much more to David than code review and contributing to KDE.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Third update to the Ubuntu Light Themes
  • Fluendo DVD Player For Sale in Ubuntu 10.10
  • How the command line made my life a little easier, part 2
  • DEB Packages Now Open With Ubuntu Software Center
  • 24-Core Linux Cluster in a $29.99 Case from IKEA
  • G'MIC: More Than 190 Image Filters And Effects For GIMP
  • X.Org Server 1.10 Release Plans; Drivers May Still Go In
  • Counter-Debunking the 1% Myth
  • GTK+ 2.90.7 Released, Drops DirectFB Support
  • Hackable, Linux-based flying drone can be controlled by smartphone
  • Red Hat partners with the NCSU Entrepreneurship Initiative for idea center
  • Linux In The Data Center: How Does It Fit?
  • PHP5 Alternatives for Red Hat Enterprise Linux
  • When "Enterprise" is a Synonym for Useless
  • Windows vs Ubuntu Release Cycle
  • Matthew Garrett files case with US Customs against Fusion Garage

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Run a Projector Remotely with GNU/Linux
  • Embed a Terminal into Nautilus
  • Install MS TrueType core fonts on Fedora
  • Hide Audio in a Simple Image
  • How to Tell What Type of Memory Your Linux PC Has Installed
  • Grep Gzipped Log Files
  • Tar tips and uses
  • 6 Perl File Handle Examples to Open, Read, and Write File

Linux Desktops, Servers and the Future

Filed under
Linux

scrye.com: Last night was the local Blug meeting, and as always it was a good and thought provoking talk. This month we had Bart Massey down from Portland talking about Linux history, where we are and where we need to go. He had some very interesting points.

Debian GNU/kFreeBSD Becomes More Interesting

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Since last year we have been talking about Debian GNU/kFreeBSD, one of the official ports for Debian 6.0 "Squeeze" that will bring a 32-bit and 64-bit FreeBSD kernel as an option to using the Linux kernel.

Earth's first all Klingon opera debuts

Filed under
Movies
Misc
Humor

theregister.co.uk: Earth has witnessed its first Klingon opera. On Friday in The Hague, Netherlands, the Terran Research Ensemble raised the curtain on "U," the first Earth opera performed entirely in Klingon.

Two Popular Distributions Release Development Milestones

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu

linuxjournal.com: On Thurday, September 2 two leading Linux distributions released milestone developmental versions on the road to their next releases. OpenSUSE released Milestone 1 of 11.4 and Ubuntu released a beta of their upcoming 10.10, codenamed Maverick Meerkat, for developers and community testers.

Damn Vulnerable Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxaria.com: I’ve used it in a virtual machine on VirtualBox and I’ve been very happy with the system, when it starts you have the opportunity to start KDE or Fluxbox, I chose Fluxbox. Once started, you will have the opportunity to start various “services” that will be used in exercises, such as a webserver and mysql.

Lucene Search Coming to openSUSE Wiki

Filed under
Web
SUSE

matthewehle.info: Most openSUSE users are aware that a new version of the English wiki was released back in July, with the other wikis soon to follow. Among many other changes, the new wiki came with a laundry list of new features. However, users have noticed that one important feature was still missing in the new wiki… a decent search engine.

Why the Linux Myths Continue

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com/blog: What will it take for Linux to lose the stigma that surrounds it in the eyes of IT administrators? If those particular myths could be undone, Linux adoption in businesses might benefit enormously. So what makes the myths continue?

Book review - Learn OpenOffice.org Spreadsheet Macros

Filed under
OOo

pcworld.com: My name is John Dukovich. I've been working with Microsoft Office applications, basically since they came out, and I'm a heavy user of Excel macros. I shied away from OpenOffice Calc for quite a while because initially I heard the macro feature wasn't as good as Excel's. However, when I got my hands on this book, OpenOffice.org Spreadsheet Macro Programming, I was curious and hoped to find I was wrong.

Project Canvas Will be *Linux* Based

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software

opendotdotdot.blogspot: I've been pretty sceptical - and critical - of the BBC's TV over IP efforts, including Project Canvas:

Also: Tanner EDA Tools Now on Linux

Microdata: HTML5’s Best-Kept Secret

Filed under
Software

webmonkey.com: Given the amount of industry noise about native video and scripted animations, you’d be forgiven if you had never heard of the new microdata specification included in HTML5.

Comings and goings in the Linux gaming world

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: Today, I'm going to discuss the interesting phenomena, rise and fall of companies, games, technologies, and other cool stuff, all related to Linux gaming. So, this is not exactly a review, but we will definitely talk about the hot cakes in the gaming oven.

Chakra Linux - Distro Review

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: The Chakra project started off as a derivative of Arch Linux. It was a modular KDE Live CD with some extra tool sets to make setting up and using Arch Linux less of a hassle.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.36 (Part 1) - Graphics

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Various changes improve the performance and functionality of drivers for graphics chips in the latest Intel mobile processors. Nouveau now supports the Fermi chips used on recent GeForce graphics cards.

The HP Mini 110 Netbook: Almost One Year Later

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

ever-increasing-entropy.blogspot: Last October, after my third Sylvania netbook failed, I took the refund I had received and bought an HP Mini 110 netbook as a replacement.

OpenIndiana - Another OpenSolaris Fork - Coming Next Week

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: There is already the Illumos Project, which is a fork of OpenSolaris with a fully open-source code-base, that is now being used within the Nexenta and SchilliX operating systems, among others. We have just been tipped off as well that next week another new OpenSolaris derivative is being announced and it's to be called OpenIndiana.

5 Things I Miss From Linux When Using OSX

Filed under
Linux

everydaylht.com: I have been a Linux user for over 10 years… until now. Recently I purchased a MacBook Pro. In the course of using it, I’ve come across a number of features of Linux and the KDE desktop that I greatly miss.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, IBM, Elytron and Container Vulnerability Scanning

  • Security updates for Friday
  • IBM Security launches open-source AI
    IBM Security unveiled an open-source toolkit at RSA 2018 that will allow the cyber community to test their AI-based security defenses against a strong and complex opponent in order to help build resilience and dependability into their systems.
  • Elytron: A New Security Framework in WildFly/JBoss EAP
    Elytron is a new security framework that ships with WildFly version 10 and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7.1. This project is a complete replacement of PicketBox and JAAS. Elytron is a single security framework that will be usable for securing management access to the server and for securing applications deployed in WildFly. You can still use the legacy security framework, which is PicketBox, but it is a deprecated module; hence, there is no guarantee that PicketBox will be included in future releases of WildFly. In this article, we will explore the components of Elytron and how to configure them in Wildfly.
  • PodCTL #32 – Container Vulnerability Scanning

NetBSD 8.0 RC1 Available, Bringing Initial USB 3.0 Support & Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation

It's a busy month for the BSDs with DragonFlyBSD 5.2 having come along with OpenBSD 6.3 and right before that was TrueOS 18.03. Now there's finally the release candidate of the long-awaited NetBSD 8.0 update. NetBSD 7.0 arrived back in October 2015 while the NetBSD 8.0 release should not be too much further out. Arguably most interesting with NetBSD 8.0 is its finally bring initial USB 3.0 support though the change-log currently just describes it as "some USB 3 support." Read more

FFmpeg 4.0 Released

  • FFmpeg 4.0 released
    Version 4.0 of the FFmpeg multimedia toolkit is out. There is a long list of new filters, formats, and more; see the announcement for details.
  • April 20th, 2018, FFmpeg 4.0 "Wu"
  • FFmpeg 4.0 Released With New Encoders/Decoders, NVIDIA NVDEC Decoding
    FFmpeg 4.0 is now available as the latest major release for this widely-used open-source multimedia encode/decoder library. FFmpeg 4.0 introduces NVIDIA NVDEC GPU-based decoding for H264 / MJPEG / HEVC / MPEG-1/2/4, VC1, VP8, and VP9 formats. This release also adds an Intel QSV accelerated overlay filter, an OpenCL overlay filter, VA-API MJPEG and VP8 decoding support, new VA-API filters, and many other accelerated code path improvements.

Graphics: AMD, Intel and Vulkan

  • AMDGPU DC Fixes For Linux 4.17 Take Care Of "The Dark Screen Issue"
    AMD's Alex Deucher has sent in a small set of fixes for the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager driver in the Linux 4.17 kernel. The three patches are for fixing a dark screen issue with AMDGPU DC, a fix for clock/voltage dependency tracking for WattMan, and an updated SMU interface for the yet-to-be-announced Vega 12 GPU.
  • Intel KVMGT 2018-Q1 Release Offers Mediated GPU Pass-Through Improvements
    While the relevant bits for supporting Intel GPU mediated pass-through to virtual machines with KVM are now upstream in the Linux kernel as well as in QEMU 2.12, Intel developers have just announced their quarterly release of "KVMGT" for those wanting the officially blessed configuration for running Intel virtual GPU support with KVM virtual machines.
  • RADV Vulkan Driver Adds Vega M Support
    Following RadeonSI adding "Vega M" support for the new Radeon graphics appearing embedded on select Intel Kabylake processor packages, the RADV developers have similarly staged their Vega M support in this open-source Vulkan driver.
  • The Forge Now Offers Full-Featured Vulkan Support On Linux
    Earlier this month we covered "The Forge" picking up initial Linux support and now they have rounded out their full-featured Linux support with Vulkan rendering.