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Thursday, 08 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora 21 to Feature KDE Frameworks 5 and MATE 1.8 Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 11:06pm
Story Blink’s First Birthday Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 10:59pm
Story Amazon’s Fire TV could scorch rivals Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 10:44pm
Story NVIDIA's Tegra K1 Jetson Will Be A Late April Debut Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 10:40pm
Story Steam Beta Client Released with Improved OpenGL Capture Speed Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 10:33pm
Story IoT on tap at upcoming Embedded Linux Conference Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 10:12pm
Story Chrome Remote Desktop Goes Into Beta on Android, Here is a Quick Look Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 10:02pm
Story Chrome Slips By Firefox in the War of the Browsers Rianne Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 9:52pm
Blog entry Manchester and Computing Roy Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 4:13pm
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 03/04/2014 - 3:33pm

Minisys Linux: Puppy on steroids

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Puppy Linux makes it easy to remaster its distribution, which probably explains the sheer number of Puppy Linux variants, called puplets, in the wild. Minisys Linux, or Muppy, is an interesting puplet in the form of a modular Linux distro based on a Puppy Linux and Slackware 12 mix.

Microsoft’s new “Global Anti-Piracy Day” must have Linux users laughing

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft’s new “Global Anti-Piracy Day” must have Linux users laughing

  • Pirates scoff at Microsoft's anti-piracy day
  • Microsoft’s “Don’t Talk Like a Pirate” day

Idiot of the Year! Ignorant Linux Writer…

Filed under
Linux

molom.wordpress: I can’t stand hearing ignorant idiotic individuals when they start posting utter rubbish on forums, but when they post their own opinion on an article, it makes me laugh for quite a while because it really reveals how much of an idiot this individual may be.

Bridging the Linux chasm

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Most people will agree on what a commercial distro is. it is fairly obvious. A distro that is funded and backed by a company. Then there is the wild west world of "Community" distros.

10 Fun Firefox Add-ons

Filed under
Moz/FF

junauza.com: We all know that Firefox has hundreds of great add-ons to enhance our web browsing experience. Since there are already plenty of lists out there that features some of the most essential add-ons, I'm left with sharing to you all this collection of fun Firefox add-ons.

Desktop Unix: MacOS X and SUSE Linux

Filed under
OS

zdnet.com/Murphy: All three of the main OS candidates: MacOS X, Novell’s “Sousa Linicks” and Microsoft’s Windows Vista run on pretty much the same hardware and run broadly comparable applications suites, so the decision must ultimately come down to which one best balances cost versus productivity in your applications area.

GIMP 2.6 changes are mostly internal

Filed under
GIMP

linux.com: The GIMP -- the GNU Image Manipulation Program -- is one of the flagships of free software. On October 1 the project released version 2.6, with many new and improved features. Most of the user-visible features are just polish; the real changes are lurking under the hood.

Flash 10 on Linux: Better, not great, better

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: Adobe Flash is still a proprietary program and I, and a lot of other open-source people, wish that it wasn't. That said, the latest Flash Player 10 on Linux is a lot faster than the last version and it opens up the doors to a lot of Web-based video content.

Firestarter - A modern Linux Firewall

Filed under
Software

brajeshwar.com: Irrespective of the operating system, intrusion is one of the key concerns for computers connected to a network. Firewalls, as a matter of fact provide a resistance to this, if not a fool proof protection.

Four password lockers that can help you keep your Web logins secure

Filed under
Software

linux.com: It is good practice to use a different password for each Web site you need to log in to. Good passwords tend to be long and contain a wide selection of characters. That can make remembering all your passwords difficult. But you can make things easier on yourself by storing passwords for various Web sites in an encrypted file on your computer.

Compositing With Metacity - An Early Look

Filed under
Software

hehe2.net: When the compositing capabilities of Spiftacity merged into the Metacity trunk, it caused a fair bit of stir among GNOME users. Included in version 2.21.5 of GNOME, though hidden from casual users, the compositing showed a lot of promise but remained just something to play around with.

Why OpenOffice.org Failed – and What to Do About It

Filed under
OOo

Glyn Moody: Last week I noted that the release of OpenOffice.org 3.0 seems to mark an important milestone in its adoption, judging at least by the healthy – and continuing – rate of downloads. But in many ways, success teaches us nothing; what is far more revealing is failure.

Opera 9.61 released

Filed under
Software

opera.com: Hot on the heels of 9.60, we had to release Opera 9.61 to address problems in Opera Link. Alone, each issue we discovered was miniscule and shouldn't have caused any problems, but together, and coupled with some server issues, it turned out to be more serious than we thought.

In these trying economic times will Linux be the answer

Filed under
Linux

dthomasdigital.wordpress: I was told today that if I’m lucky my budget will only be cut by 10%. Being that I work for State government you would think that I would be more worried than I am. Then why do I think this is a great opportunity for me?

Why should Microsoft fans want (even help!) Linux to succeed

Imagine that your football team wins the championship the last years and it has completely crashed all competition. Would you be happy with the way your team played with no competition at all? It would surely play crappy, because it wouldn't need to try any harder.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Debian Project News - October 20th, 2008

  • gOS To Support Intel's Moblin Project
  • Gallery 2.3 (Skidoo) Released
  • Novell Betas Open Enterprise Server 2 SP1
  • Inquisitor stresses and benchmarks your hardware
  • Canonical Hiring KDE Desktop Developer
  • The dying embers of Microsoft's IP claims against open source
  • Back to Linux
  • Vinyl + Audacity = MP3
  • Test Drive Firefox 3.1 Beta 1
  • Where Would We Be Without Open Source?
  • Memory lane: Microsoft blames Red Hat for not making Linux popular enough
  • Perspectives extension improves HTTPS security
  • Re: Switch to Ubuntu Linux not Apple Mac OS
  • Novell's identity management gets some open-source competition
  • Indian political party turns to FOSS
  • Mandriva and Turbolinux to Join Moblin Project to Expand Atom-Based Products
  • Linux Foundation Reports on First End User Summit
  • UK gains LPI affiliate
  • Firefox new tab page to change

OpenOffice.org 3.0 scores strong first week

Filed under
OOo

computerworld.com: OpenOffice.org 3.0 was downloaded 3 million times in its first week, with about 80% of the downloads by Windows users, an official with the group said in a blog post on Monday.

Worldwide 2009 Mandriva Linux Installfest

Filed under
MDV

mandriva.com: In order to bring Linux to new users and present the new features and technologies available in Mandriva Linux 2009, Mandriva is mobilizing its network of Linux User Groups (LUGs) to coordinate a worldwide Installfest on November 22nd, November 2008.

Community vs. Commercial GNU/Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: You can categorize most GNU/Linux distributions as either community or commercial. Community-based distributions like Debian, Fedora, or CentOS are maintained largely by volunteers and donations of services or money, while commercial distributions like Suse, Red Hat, or Xandros are backed by a company and compete directly against proprietary operating systems such as Windows and OS X.

Open Source Is Far From Free

Filed under
OSS

law.com: In his highly acclaimed best seller, The World is Flat, Thomas Friedman hails open-sourcing as one of 10 "flatteners" of the world. Nevertheless, many enterprises have included open-source code in their proprietary software without fully understanding the risks.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Lenovo Cloud Director: Open Source Technologies Are The Glue That Binds The Hybrid Cloud
    Hardware giant Lenovo is banking on a future where both public and private clouds are critical in driving IT innovation, and the glue binding those hybrid environments is mostly open source technologies. Dan Harmon, Lenovo's group director of cloud and software-defined infrastructure, encouraged solution providers attending the NexGen Cloud Conference & Expo on Wednesday to explore opportunities to engage Lenovo as its products stock the next generation of cloud data centers. Both public and private clouds are growing rapidly and will dominate the market by 2020, Harmon told attendees of the conference produced by CRN parent The Channel Company.
  • Cloudera Ratchets Up its Training for Top Open Source Data Solutions
    Recently, we've taken note of the many organizations offering free or low cost Hadoop and Big Data training. MIT and MapR are just a couple of the players making waves in this space. Recently, Cloudera announced a catalog of online, self-paced training classes covering the company's entire portfolio of industry-standard Apache Hadoop and Apache Spark training courses. The courses, according to Cloudera, allow you to learn about the latest big data technologies "in a searchable environment anytime, anywhere." Now, Cloudera has announced an updated lineup of training courses and performance-based certification exams for data analysts, database administrators, and developers. The expanded training offerings address the skills gap around many top open source technologies, such as Apache Impala (incubating), Apache Spark, Apache Kudu, Apache Kafka and Apache Hive.
  • Netflix’s open-source project Hollow, NVIDIA’s deep learning kits for educators, and new IBM Bluemix integrations—SD Times news digest: Dec. 6, 2016
  • Open governance enhances the value of land use policy software
    In December 2015, the COP21 Paris Agreement saw many countries commit to reducing greenhouse gas emissions through initiatives in the land sector. In this context, emissions estimation systems will be key in ensuring these targets are met. Such solutions would not only be capable of assessing past trends but also of supporting target setting, tracking progress and helping to develop scenarios to inform policy decisions.
  • Blender Institute collaborate with Lulzbot in the name of open source
    Blender Institute, a platform for 3D design and animation, are collaborating with Lulzbot 3D printers. This project a continuation of Lulzbot and Blender Institute’s approach to open source and aimed at enhancing collaboration. The Blender Institute in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, is an important figure in the Free and Open Source Software community (FOSS). Providing open source design tool software for 3D movies, games, and visual effects. While Lulzbot, a product line of Aleph Objects take an open source approach to hardware through their 3D printers.
  • Bluetooth 5 Specification Released

Remembering Linux Installfests

Ah, yes. I remember the good old days when you had to be a real man or woman to install Linux, and the first time you tried you ended up saying something like “Help!” or maybe “Mommmmyyyyy!” Really, kids, that’s how it was. Stacks of floppies that took about 7,000 hours to download over your 16 baud connection. Times sure have changed, haven’t they? I remember Caldera advertising that their distribution autodetected 1,500 different monitors. I wrote an article titled “Monitor Number 1501,” because it didn’t detect my monitor. And sound. Getting sound going in Linux took mighty feats of systemic administsationish strength. Mere mortals could not do it. And that’s why we had installfests: so mighty Linux he-men and she-women could come down from the top of Slackware Mountain or the Red Hat Volcano and share their godlike wisdom with us. We gladly packed up our computers and took them to the installfest location (often at a college, since many Linux-skilled people were collegians) and walked away with Linuxized computers. Praise be! Read more

What New Is Going To Be In Ubuntu 17.04 'Zesty Zapus'

Right on the heels of Ubuntu 16.10 'Yakkety Yak' is Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus. Ubuntu 17.04 is currently scheduled for release on April 13, 2017 but know that this is only an estimate. One thing to know is that all things being equal, it is going to be released in April 2017. Ubuntu Zesty Zapus will be supported for only 9 months until January 2018 as it is not a LTS (long term support) release. Read
more

Security News

  • News in brief: DirtyCOW patched for Android; naked lack of security; South Korea hacked
  • Millions exposed to malvertising that hid attack code in banner pixels
    Researchers from antivirus provider Eset said "Stegano," as they've dubbed the campaign, dates back to 2014. Beginning in early October, its unusually stealthy operators scored a major coup by getting the ads displayed on a variety of unnamed reputable news sites, each with millions of daily visitors. Borrowing from the word steganography—the practice of concealing secret messages inside a larger document that dates back to at least 440 BC—Stegano hides parts of its malicious code in parameters controlling the transparency of pixels used to display banner ads. While the attack code alters the tone or color of the images, the changes are almost invisible to the untrained eye.
  • Backdoor accounts found in 80 Sony IP security camera models
    Many network security cameras made by Sony could be taken over by hackers and infected with botnet malware if their firmware is not updated to the latest version. Researchers from SEC Consult have found two backdoor accounts that exist in 80 models of professional Sony security cameras, mainly used by companies and government agencies given their high price. One set of hard-coded credentials is in the Web interface and allows a remote attacker to send requests that would enable the Telnet service on the camera, the SEC Consult researchers said in an advisory Tuesday.
  • I'm giving up on PGP
    After years of wrestling GnuPG with varying levels of enthusiasm, I came to the conclusion that it's just not worth it, and I'm giving up. At least on the concept of long term PGP keys. This is not about the gpg tool itself, or about tools at all. Many already wrote about that. It's about the long term PGP key model—be it secured by Web of Trust, fingerprints or Trust on First Use—and how it failed me.