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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Quick Look: Peppermint Five Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 9:14am
Story Gluon Project Update Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 7:45am
Story 3 open source tools to make your presentations pop Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 7:40am
Story Automotive Grade Linux Released for Open Source Cars Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 7:32am
Story How to Use Parental Controls on Ubuntu Linux Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 7:25am
Story Android Wear Review: Putting the Smartphone on Your Wrist Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 7:13am
Story Firefox and Gtk+ 3 Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 7:04am
Story KDE Vivaldi Dead, To Know Tor, and New Mint ISOs Roy Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 5:38am
Story Ubuntu phone release date: on track for 2014 launch Roy Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 5:29am
Story HandyLinux 1.5.1 Adds Text Mode Installation Roy Schestowitz 01/07/2014 - 10:50pm

Fatal Windows 7 Flaw Will Bolster Linux Netbooks

Filed under
Microsoft

workswithu.com: I think Microsoft has done a reasonably good job developing Windows 7. Most early buzz about the operating system was positive. But when it comes to running Windows 7 on netbooks, Microsoft has made a fatal design decision that will open the door for more Linux netbooks.

You Get What You Pay For

Filed under
OSS

linuxtoday.com: "You get what you pay for" is a common FUDphrase used to discredit Linux and FOSS, because so much of it is available free of cost. Which scares the purveyors of overpriced crapware, who would rather walk barefoot through broken glass and burning dung than write software that customers actually feel happy paying for.

Embracing Change: The Linux Paradigm

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: It's time to embrace change in the IT world. Linux, for many, is ushering in a new age of reason. But why the sudden move this direction? Is it a trendy move or a paradigm shift?

KDE 4 is not user ready

Filed under
KDE

kdedevelopers.org: It is often said that many open-source-software is not enterprise-ready. But in order to be enterprise-ready, software must first be user-ready. I want to give you a feeling what I mean.

Why Does Everyone Heart Boxee?

Filed under
Software

gigaom.com: The buzz has been building for Boxee lately. Mainstream news outlets like The New York Times, BusinessWeek and NPR are getting hip to the little open-source media center that could quite possibly change the way you experience TV.

Linux Around the World

Filed under
Linux

linuxfoundation.org: One of the coolest things about the Internet for me personally is that it lets you travel the world, yet can always bring you home in an instant. This may sound corny, but it never fails to amaze me, especially when I am far from home, as I am now.

Tiny Silent Linux PC Gets Updated

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

automatedhome.co.uk: In 2007 we ran a story on the tiny linux PC The Linutop. Now the diminutive system has hit version 2.4 and with it an official launch in the UK. The pint-sized, open source Linux PC is designed to run silently and is highly energy efficient at just 8 watts.

Damn Small indeed

Filed under
Linux

tangledbits.blogspot: Over the last several weeks I have been cleaning out my computer room. While digging through paperwork I found a pen that someone had given to me. The pen contained a 64MB USB drive. I set the pen off to the side. "Great," I thought, "now I can try to put Linux on there."

Xfce creator talks Linux, Moblin, netbooks and open-source

Filed under
Interviews

slashgear.com: SlashGear caught up with Xfce creator Olivier Fourdan, whose desktop environment has not only been selected by Intel for Moblin but can be found on many existing Linux netbooks, and talked Intel, Moblin, the future for netbooks and what challenges he sees for open-source newcomer Android.

More about Linux games - Part 5

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: This time of season again: Linux gaming. Today, I will show you several more interesting titles that you may want to run on your Linux desktop.

Canonical's Survey Results Give Insight to Server Market Far Beyond Ubuntu

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com/blog: After taking a closer look at the survey, I'd recommend it to anyone interested in current server technologies, or where the server market is headed -- even if Ubuntu Server isn't part of the equation.

RPM 4.6.0 released

Filed under
Software

heise-online.co.uk: Nine months after the last release, the RPM.org developers have announced RPM 4.6.0, a new version of the RPM Package Manager, one of the main packaging formats for many Linux distributions and part of the Linux Standard Base (LSB).

Woah, What?!?!

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: The Phoronix headline was probably a little confusing, Compiz Fusion as a project is not being dropped, we’re here to stay, however considering that the same two leaders are in charge of both Compiz and Compiz Fusion, we have decided to merge the two projects.

Ubuntu shines where OS X fails

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntuproductivity.com: Coming from a lifetime as a Mac user you can imagine that I am rather trusting of the OS, especially as a creative tool. The first catastrophe was using Leopard server.

Marten Mickos is leaving Sun amid reorg

blogs.the451group: I just got news that Marten Mickos, former MySQL CEO, is to depart Sun amid a reorganisation of its infrastructure and database business units. Marten’s departure is a big loss for Sun and follows quickly after the departures of Monty Widenius and David Axmark.

Open Source Means Business

Filed under
OSS

forbes.com: Sizable companies have been built from commercializing open-source software. Some entrepreneurs have found ways to build their companies on a shoestring using open source software, and they have figured out how to make money off something generally considered free.

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More in Tux Machines

How China Mobile Is Using Linux and Open Source

China Mobile is one of the biggest telecom companies in the world, with more than 800 million users in China -- all of whom are served with open source technologies. During the 2016 Mobile World Congress, China Mobile declared that the operational support system running their massive network would be based on open source software. China Mobile is not alone; many major networking vendors are moving to open source technologies. For example, AT&T is building their future network on top of OpenStack, and they have invested in software-defined technology so significantly that they now call themselves a software company. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • [elementaryOS] AppCenter: Funded
    A few moments ago, we hit 100% funded for our AppCenter campaign on Indiegogo. Thank you, backers! More than 300 people backed us over just two weeks to help bring our pay-what-you-want indie app store to life.
  • Linux Lite To Have These New Features In The Next Release Linux Lite 3.4
    ...we contacted the creator of the Linux Lite “Jerry Bezencon” and enquired the upcoming new features in the latest version of the Linux Lite. We have also done a review of the latest available distro i.e. 3.2 (32 bit) so that the readers can understand easily where are the new features headed towards.
  • Buy or Sell? What Analysts Recommends: CMS Energy Corporation (CMS), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • What Does The Chart For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell Us Presently?
  • LEDE-17.01 is coming [Ed: it has actually just come out, just like LWN's paywall]
    For some years, OpenWrt has arguably been the most active router-oriented distribution. Things changed in May of last year, though, when a group of OpenWrt developers split off to form the competing LEDE project. While the LEDE developers have been busy, the project has yet to make its first release. That situation is about to change, though, as evidenced by the LEDE v17.01.0-rc1 release candidate, which came out on February 1. Many of the changes made in LEDE since the 2015 OpenWrt "Chaos Calmer" release will not be immediately visible to most users. The core software has been updated, of course, including a move to the 4.4.42 kernel. There are a number of security-oriented enhancements, including a switch to SHA256 for package verification, the disabling of support for several old and insecure protocols, compilation with stack-overwrite detection, and more. There is support for a number of new devices. Perhaps the most anticipated new feature, though, is the improved smart queue management and the WiFi fairness work that has been done as part of the bufferbloat project. It has been clear for some time that WiFi should work far better than it does; the work that has found its way into the LEDE release candidate should be a significant step in that direction. Your editor decided that it was time to give LEDE a try, but there was some shopping to be done first. Getting the full benefit from the bufferbloat and airtime fairness work requires the right chipset; most of this work has been done on the Atheros ath9k driver. So the first step was to go out and pick up a new router with ath9k wireless. That is where the things turned out to be harder than one might expect.
  • Microsoft Faces European Privacy Probes Over Windows 10
    Microsoft Corp. faces a coordinated investigation by European privacy regulators after it failed to do enough to address their concerns about the collection and processing of user data with a series of changes to Windows 10 last month. European Union data-protection officials sent a letter to Microsoft saying they remain “concerned about the level of protection of users’ personal data,” according to a copy of the document posted by the Dutch watchdog Tuesday. Regulators from seven countries are concerned that even after the announced changes, “Microsoft does not comply with fundamental privacy rules.”

Leftovers: OSS