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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Heroes Of Newerth Gone Retail
  • Canceling MOTU
  • Mozilla Proposes Search-Based Extension Distribution
  • Bricsys Releases Briscad V10 Beta for Linux
  • gtk icon cache search tool
  • Buffalo Technology embraces opensource firmware
  • The X.Org, Mesa Plans For Ubuntu 10.10
  • Combing Github for Games
  • Network video recorder, powered by Linux
  • Review: A Practical Guide to Fedora and Red Hat
  • TuxRadar Podcast Season 2 Episode 8
  • My PCLinuxOS Desktop
  • Ubuntu open to greater touch
  • Sync Your Life
  • Shotwell to Replace F-Spot in upcoming Ubuntu
  • Suricata – Open Source Intrusion Detection

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Configuring IPv6 tunneling with AICCU
  • Making Movies in Linux with Kdenlive
  • how to boot a gentoo LiveCD via PXE
  • Linux Play Video CD
  • Configure Xorg X11 Window System
  • Tune your Linux kernel with sysctl
  • Your own OEM configuration: YaST Firstboot

Slackage Management, Baby!

Filed under
Slack

lockergnome.com: There are those who say that Slackware Linux doesn’t really have a package manager. BAH! I say. It has two package management systems, actually.

CXGames 9.0 - Hands on Review

Filed under
Software

jeffhoogland.blogspot: The first thing you will notice when using CXGames 9.0 if you had used past versions is that the GUI has under gone a refreshing change.

Novell selected as finalist for 2010 American Business Awards

Filed under
SUSE

novell.com/prblogs: We’re pleased to report that industry accolades for SUSE Studio and the SUSE Appliance Program continue to roll in, as the industry recognizes the innovation and benefits of software appliances. Finalists were announced today for the 2010 American Business Awards (a.k.a. the Stevies) and Novell has been honored for both offerings.

Novell preps service pack for SUSE Linux 11

Filed under
SUSE

theregister.co.uk: Novell is close to launching Service Pack 1 for SUSE Linux 11 on the desktop and server.

FLOSS Manuals Expands Its Open Source Documentation Effort

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com/blog: It's been a while since we here at OStatic checked in on FLOSS Manuals, an ambitious effort to produce free, online documentation for open source software. Here are some of the details on what's new there.

Five Best Linux Netbook OSes - for Now

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Tired of Windows 7 Starter Edition? Ready to boot XP off the netbook? Linux runs particularly well on Netbooks, but it might be hard to choose which flavor is best for you right now.

Some Issues I found with Dual Monitors in KDE

Filed under
KDE
Hardware

doknowevil.net: I use dual monitors and heavily use the expo compiz plugin (equivalent to kwin’s ‘desktop grid’). However, the behavior in KDE is a bit odd to me.

Diaspora about to hit $100,000 in donations

Filed under
Software
Web

news.cnet.com: Perhaps the most damning critique of Facebook's recent controversial moves has been that a group of programmers have been raising money to create an alternative--and people are donating.

The issues with client side window decorations

Filed under
Software

martin-graesslin.com/blog: As you probably have noticed I oppose the introduction of CSD. I think they will have more disadvantages than benefits to the user. In fact I do not see any pro argument for CSD.

Tips: Red Hat RPM and Yellowdog YUM package management

Filed under
Linux

Learn how to install, upgrade and manage packages on your Linux system. This article focuses on the Red Hat Package Manager (RPM) developed by Red Hat, as well as the Yellowdog Updater Modified (YUM). Explore the best ways to add new software and keep your system current.

Ubuntu Utils – It’s The Little Things

Filed under
Software

lockergnome.com: Sometimes in life, you have to get it where you can. In that spirit, I got to thinking about which smalls apps or utilities really made things great on my (X)Ubuntu systems.

Who Cares if FOSS Is Profitable?

Filed under
OSS

linuxinsider.com: Does money make the FOSS world go round? Perhaps. Making money is what gives people and projects "the option of continuing to be free, as opposed to 'selling out' or abandoning the whole thing just to pay the bills."

Firefighters Save Money Switiching to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Firefighters Save Money Switiching to Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Linux is Prime Time for your Business Notebook & Desktop
  • Ubuntu derivatives flourish
  • Ubuntu Light Shuts Out Future Ubuntu Moblin/MeeGo Remixes
  • The Performance Of Ubuntu KVM Virtualization

Over a hundred Finland schools using open source

Filed under
OSS
Ubuntu

osor.eu: More than a hundred schools across Finland are using open source for all of their desktop PCs, according to Opinsys, an open source services provider.

Pidgin 2.7.0 addresses emoticon vulnerability

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: The Pidgin developers have announced the release of version 2.7.0 of their open source instant messenger application.

Illumination Software Creator Beta 1

Filed under
Software

lunduke.com: The Illumination Software Creator allows you to visually create your application by linking together colorful building blocks of functionality.

Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Lucid Lynx review

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcadvisor.co.uk: Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Lucid Lynx is the latest Linux operating system from Canonical, aimed at consumers. It's free, but is it sufficiently consumer friendly that you should switch from Windows?

OpenOffice.org Still Kicking

Filed under
OOo

ostatic.com/blog: Reports to contrary, the launch of Microsoft Office 2010 doesn't mean that OpenOffice.org is dead — or even wounded.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Thousands of FedEx customers' private info exposed in legacy server data breach

    Uncovered by Kromtech Security Center, the parent company of MacKeeper Security, the breach exposed data such as passport information, driver's licenses and other high profile security IDs, all of which were hosted on a password-less Amazon S3 storage server.

  • Correlated Cryptojacking

    they include The City University of New York (cuny.edu), Uncle Sam's court information portal (uscourts.gov), Lund University (lu.se), the UK's Student Loans Company (slc.co.uk), privacy watchdog The Information Commissioner's Office (ico.org.uk) and the Financial Ombudsman Service (financial-ombudsman.org.uk), plus a shedload of other .gov.uk and .gov.au sites, UK NHS services, and other organizations across the globe.

    Manchester.gov.uk, NHSinform.scot, agriculture.gov.ie, Croydon.gov.uk, ouh.nhs.uk, legislation.qld.gov.au, the list goes on.

  • Facebook using 2FA cell numbers for spam, replies get posted to the platform

    Replies ending up as comments appears to be a bizarre bug, but the spamming seems intentional.

  • Swedish Police website hacked [sic] to mine cryptocurrency

    Remember now, it is a Police Force that allowed their website to be hijacked by this simple attack vector. The authority assigned to serve and protect. More specifically, the authority that argues that wiretapping is totally safe because the Police is competent in IT security matters, so there’s no risk whatsoever your data will leak or be mishandled.

    This is one of the websites that were trivially hacked [sic].

    It gives pause for thought.

    It also tells you what you already knew: authorities can’t even keep their own dirtiest laundry under wraps, so the notion that they’re capable or even willing to protect your sensitive data is hogwash of the highest order.

  • New EU Privacy Law May Weaken Security

    In a bid to help domain registrars comply with the GDPR regulations, ICANN has floated several proposals, all of which would redact some of the registrant data from WHOIS records. Its mildest proposal would remove the registrant’s name, email, and phone number, while allowing self-certified 3rd parties to request access to said data at the approval of a higher authority — such as the registrar used to register the domain name.

    The most restrictive proposal would remove all registrant data from public WHOIS records, and would require legal due process (such as a subpoena or court order) to reveal any information supplied by the domain registrant.

  • Intel hit with 32 lawsuits over security flaws

    Intel Corp said on Friday shareholders and customers had filed 32 class action lawsuits against the company in connection with recently-disclosed security flaws in its microchips.

  • The Risks of "Responsible Encryption"

    Federal law enforcement officials in the United States have recently renewed their periodic demands for legislation to regulate encryption. While they offer few technical specifics, their general proposal—that vendors must retain the ability to decrypt for law enforcement the devices they manufacture or communications their services transmit—presents intractable problems that would-be regulators must not ignore.

  • Reviewing SSH Mastery 2nd Ed

    It’s finally out ! Michael W Lucas is one of the best authors of technical books out there. I was curious about this new edition. It is not a reference book, but covers the practical aspects of SSH that I wish everybody knew. Rather than aggregating different articles/blogs on SSH, this book covers 90% of the common use cases for SSH that you will ever encounter.

Android Leftovers

Amazon Linux 2 - Who nicked my cheese?

So far, it's a relatively benign, easy introduction to a new operating system that blends the familiar and new in a timid package. Perhaps that's the goal, because a radical offering would right away scare everyone. Amazon Linux 2 is an appealing concept, as it gives users what Red Hat never quite did (yet) - A Fedora-like bleeding-edge tech with the stability and long-term support of the mainstay enterprise offering. But then, it also pulls a Debian/Ubuntu stunt by breaking ABI, so it will be cubicle to those who enjoying living la vida loco (in their cubicle or open-space prison). Having lived and breathed the large-scale HPC world for many years, I am quite piqued to see how this will evolve. Performance, stability and ease of use will be my primary concerns. Then, is it possible to hook up a remote virtual machine into the EC2 hive? That's another experiment, and I'd like to see if scaling and deployment works well over distributed networks. Either way, even if nothing comes out of it, Amazon Linux 2 is a nice start to a possibly great adventure. Or yet another offspring in the fragmented family we call Linux. Time will tell. Off you go. Cloud away. Read more

Updates From OpenIndiana and LibreOffice (Projects That Oracle Discarded)

  • Migration to GCC 6.4 as userland compiler
    Modulo some minor details, the transition of our userland to GCC 6 is complete.
  • OpenIndiana Has Upgraded To The GCC 6 Compiler
    The OpenSolaris/Illumos-based OpenIndiana operating system has finally moved past GCC 4.9 as its base user-land compiler and is now using GCC 6.4. This comes while GCC 8.1 should be officially released in the next few weeks and they are already targeting GCC 7.3.0 as their next illumos-gate compiler.
  • LibreOffice 6.0 Open-Source Office Suite Passes 1 Million Downloads Mark
    The Document Foundation announced recently that its LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite reached almost 1 million downloads since its release last month on January 31, 2018. That's terrific news for the Open Source and Free Software community and a major milestone for the acclaimed LibreOffice office suite, which tries to be a free alternative to proprietary solutions like Microsoft Office. The 1 million downloads mark was reached just two weeks after the release of LibreOffice 6.0, which is the biggest update ever of the open-source office suite adding numerous new features and enhancements over previous versions.