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Tuesday, 22 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story NHS and Free/Open Source Software Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2015 - 11:21am
Story Fears Grow For Safety of Imprisoned Syrian Open Source Developer, Bassel Khartabil Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2015 - 11:07am
Story Open Source for Log Analytics – Let’s get serious Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2015 - 11:02am
Story GNOME 3.20 to Be Dubbed Delhi Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2015 - 10:56am
Story September update for Plasma’s Wayland porting Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2015 - 10:32am
Story Unprivileged eBPF Support In The Works For The Linux Kernel Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2015 - 10:05am
Story Track the night sky with Stellarium on Fedora Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2015 - 9:34am
Story systemd 227 Is a Major Release That Adds a Lot of Awesome New Features Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2015 - 9:29am
Story Ubuntu Touch OTA-7 Will Arrive on October 19 for All Ubuntu Phones Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2015 - 9:27am
Story One Uncle's gift of Linux Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2015 - 9:25am

Best of Proposed Mageia Logo

Filed under
Linux

linuxbsdos.com: There is an ongoing discussion about different aspects of the project, and one of those discussion revolves around the project’s logo. There have been some very good and some not so good logos proposed by community members, and what is being presented in this article are some of the proposed logos.

Tuxpaint: hook ‘em on open source graphics while they’re young

Filed under
Software

Tuxpaint is an open source graphics program that occupies a special niche: it is designed for children. This makes it a rarity in the software community known for every developer scratching his or her own itch.

LibreOffice: An Idea Whose Time Has Come (and Gone)

Filed under
LibO

gigaom.com (Matt Asay): The big news in Open Source Land this week is that the OpenOffice community has kissed goodbye to its project owner, Oracle, so it can set up The Document Foundation and a new spin on the OpenOffice code called LibreOffice. The bigger news is that anyone cares.

The "Free Beer" Hangover

Filed under
OSS

linuxjournal.com: A couple of days ago, I talked about Yahoo's warning messages saying my system (Linux) had not been tested with their mail program. These services offer free beer and we, as users are drinking it up without any thought of the costs afterwards.

How will GNOME 3.0 be Received?

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: Either way. After a week of using GNOME Shell, the preview of GNOME 3.0, on Fedora 13, that is the closest I can come to a prediction about how GNOME's new desktop will be received when it is officially released in the spring of 2011.

An Inconvenient Truth

Filed under
Ubuntu

apachelog.wordpress: Are you tired of having to install Ubuntu Tweak every time you install Ubuntu to get the window button alignment you want? Are you tired of having random stuff appended to your emails? Are you tired of having decision made behind your back?

Fedora 14 Beta Emerges with Latest in Open Source Software

Filed under
Linux

redhat.com: The Beta release of Fedora 14 “Laughlin” similarly provides a preview of some of the best free and open source technology currently under development, integrated into an ordered distribution that anyone can freely download, use, modify, and redistribute.

6 Useful Linux One Liners

Filed under
HowTos

thegeekstuff.com: Individual Linux commands can be combined in the command line, to accomplish tasks that otherwise would require shell scripts to be written.

Red Hat Priced Like It's 1999: Expect a Hangover Like 2001

Filed under
Linux

seekingalpha.com: The business model appears to be workable, no doubt, but Red Hat's valuation seems to come straight from 1999; they have a price/sales ratio of 9.96 and a P/E ratio of 85.

Ten ways to stop novice users quitting Linux

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk: It's all very well handing out Linux machines to users unfamiliar with the operating system, but you risk running into problems that a little preparation could easily avoid, says Jack Wallen.

OpenOffice.org Community announces The Document Foundation

Filed under
LibO
OOo
  • OpenOffice.org Community announces The Document Foundation
  • OpenOffice.org developers move to break ties with Oracle
  • LibreOffice: OpenOffice.org Liberated
  • LibreOffice: The newest member of the ODF family
  • LibreOffice is Born!
  • OpenOffice.org Community announces The Document Foundation
  • OpenOffice files Oracle divorce papers
  • LibreOffice - A fresh page for OpenOffice

More Delays For Firefox 4 Feature Freeze Release

Filed under
Moz/FF

conceivablytech.com: It appears as if Mozilla will not be able to finalize the crucial Firefox 4 Beta 7 release this month. Once more, Mozilla is delaying the release of the Beta that will have all features of the final version of Firefox 4.

Linux Mint 7 Gloria to reach end of life

Filed under
Linux

linuxmint.com: Linux Mint 7 Gloria will reach end of life on October 23, 2010. This release was based on Ubuntu 9.04 which is planned to reach end-of-life at the same date.

Setting Up An NFS Server And Client On CentOS 5.5

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how to set up an NFS server and an NFS client on CentOS 5.5. NFS stands for Network File System; through NFS, a client can access (read, write) a remote share on an NFS server as if it was on the local hard disk.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Happy 27th Birthday GNU Project!
  • Double Standards on Open Standards
  • Debian != Ubuntu! -- "Please download the voice plugin to make a call"
  • Transparency
  • Clonezilla: Recovery for many file systems
  • Scanning tunneling microscope under GPL3
  • Interesting uses for Ubuntu One
  • Why is Red Hat promoting Flash video content?
  • Rugged, fanless PCs report for duty
  • Snort rival launches threat-detection start-up
  • Do Linux Distributions Innovate?
  • Is Adobe's open source strategy a commercial consulting trap?
  • Children in Brazil and Asia get low-cost Linux computers
  • Review: aptosid 2010-02 "Keres" KDE
  • PCLinuxOS Quartely ISOs due first week October
  • Educational Tools for my School
  • Krum – Hack-N-Slash cRPG Under Development!
  • The Linux Action Show! s13e09 | Ubuntu Store Concerns

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • The easiest way to set up Samba for file-sharing
  • Top 10 Beginner Level Video Tutorials To Learn GIMP Fast
  • Softlinks vs. Hardlinks: A Quick Explanation
  • Safely Remove PPAs and Roll Back to Stable Versions in Ubuntu
  • How to see what Ubuntu is doing as it boots
  • Bash Programming Tutorial 2 – More about Bash Programming
  • Login to Ubuntu using your face
  • Difference Between Single and Double Quotes in the Bash Shell
  • use rsync to backup and synchronize files to USB drive
  • Restricting a user’s shell permissions on Ubuntu Server 10.04 with lshell
  • Some tips for troubleshooting packages on your system
  • Turn off modeline support in Vim
  • Using the SHA2 hash family with OpenGPGv2 cards and GnuPG
  • Linux Server Monitoring with Bijk
  • Lock package versions,keep application at specific version in Ubuntu
  • Open Source Software Shortcut -- Escaping SSH With ~

The (r)evolution of operating systems

toolbox.com/blogs: An operating system is a program, pure and simply put it is a system interface between the hardware and user space programs. Put in terms of a sandwich. The hardware is the bottom slice of bread. The operating system is the various sandwich fillings and the user space programs are the top slice of bread.

Pinguy OS 10.04.1.2

Filed under
Linux
  • Pinguy OS 10.04.1.2
  • Pinguy OS 10.04.1.2 Review

Android: Open Source or Just an Open Mess?

Filed under
OSS

androidguys.com: Those of us who are familiar with the "with Google" stamp on the back of our respective Android phones what does this actually signify? Is it part of a carrier deal that gives exclusivity to Google premium apps like Gmail and the Android Market, or part of a grander scheme to make ODM's like Archos, Augen, Camangi, et al have inferior software so only the Google approved ones will survive like Verizon's Droid and Sprint's Evo?

Open Source and Sustainability

Filed under
OSS

blogs.alternet.org: As strange as it may sound, switching to Open Source operating systems and software – and getting your boss, co-workers, friends and relatives to do so – can save a lot more carbon emissions than getting them to change their lightbulbs.

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More in Tux Machines

Server/OSS: Data Storage, OpenStack, Nextcloud, Puppet

  • Open Source Storage: 64 Applications for Data Storage
    As data storage needs continue to grow and many organizations move toward software-defined infrastructure, more enterprises are using open source software to meet some of their storage needs. Projects like Hadoop, Ceph, Gluster and others have become very common at large enterprises. Home users and small businesses can also benefit from open source storage software. These applications can make it possible to set up your own NAS or SAN device using industry-standard hardware without paying the high prices vendors charge for dedicated storage appliances. Open source software also offers users the option to set up a cloud storage solution where they have control over security and privacy, and it can also offer affordable options for backup and recovery.
  • OpenStack Moves Beyond the Cloud to Open Infrastructure
    The OpenStack Summit got underway on May 21, with a strong emphasis on the broader open-source cloud community beyond just the OpenStack cloud platform itself. At the summit, the OpenStack Foundation announced that it was making its open-source Zuul continuous development, continuous integration (CI/CD) technology a new top level standalone project. Zuul has been the underlying DevOps CI/CD system that has been used for the past six years, to develop and test the OpenStack cloud platform.
  • OpenStack makes Zuul continuous delivery tool its second indie project
    The OpenStack Foundation has launched its Zuul continuous delivery and integration tool as a discrete project. Zuul is therefore Foundation’s second project other than OpenStack itself. The first was Kata Containers. Making Zuul a standalone effort therefore advance’s the Foundation’s ambition to become a bit like the Linux and Apache Foundations, by nurturing multiple open source projects.
  • OpenStack spins out its Zuul open source CI/CD platform
    There are few open-source projects as complex as OpenStack, which essentially provides large companies with all the tools to run the equivalent of the core AWS services in their own data centers. To build OpenStack’s various systems the team also had to develop some of its own DevOps tools, and, in 2012, that meant developing Zuul, an open-source continuous integration and delivery (CI/CD) platform. Now, with the release of Zuul v3, the team decided to decouple Zuul from OpenStack and run it as an independent project. It’s not quite leaving the OpenStack ecosystem, though, as it will still be hosted by the OpenStack Foundation.
  • Nextcloud 13: How to Get Started and Why You Should
    In its simplest form, the Nextcloud server is "just" a personal, free software alternative to services like Dropbox or iCloud. You can set it up so your files are always accessible via the internet, from wherever you are, and share them with your friends. However, Nextcloud can do so much more. In this article, I first describe what the Nextcloud server is and how to install and set it up on GNU/Linux systems. Then I explain how to configure the optional Nextcloud features, which may be the first steps toward making Nextcloud the shell of a complete replacement for many proprietary platforms existing today, such as Dropbox, Facebook and Skype.
  • Why use Puppet for automation and orchestration
    Puppet the company bills Puppet the automation tool as the de facto standard for automating the delivery and ongoing operation of hybrid infrastructure. That was certainly true at one time: Puppet not only goes back to 2005, but also currently claims 40,000 organizations worldwide as users, including 75 percent of the Fortune 100. While Puppet is still a very strong product and has increased its speed and capabilities over the years, its competitors, in particular Chef, have narrowed the gap. As you might expect from the doyenne of the IT automation space, Puppet has a very large collection of modules, and covers the gamut from CI/CD to cloud-native infrastructure, though much of that functionality is provided through additional products. While Puppet is primarily a model-based system with agents, it supports push operations with Puppet Tasks. Puppet Enterprise is even available as a service on Amazon.

today's howtos

Oregan unveils new middleware for Linux STBs and Android TV

Oregan Networks, a provider of digital TV software services, has announced the launch of a new set-top box client middleware product for pay-TV operators called SparQ. The software is designed to work on the most challenging and resource-limited STB platforms in the field, making it feasible to introduce new OTT content services and applications on customer devices that were deployed as part of the first wave of IPTV and hybrid broadcast deployments. Read more

KDE Development Updates

  • Revisiting my talk at FOSSASIA summit, 2018
    Earlier this year, I had the chance to speak about one of KDE community’s cool projects that is helpding developers erase the line between desktop and mobile/tablet UI’s with ease. I’m referring to the Kirigami UI framework – a set of QtQuick components targetted at the mobile as well as desktop platforms. This is particularly important to KDE and a lot of projects are now migrating towards a Kirigami UI, particularly keeping in mind the ability to run the applications on the Plasma Mobile.
  • This Week in KDE, Part 2 : OYLG, Workspace KCM, Single/Double Click
    Last weekend, I went to İstanbul to attend Özgür Yazılım ve Linux Günleri (Free Software and Linux Days 2018) to represent LibreOffice. We had 3 presentations during the event about LibreOffice Development and The Open Document Format. We had booth setup with stickers, flyers, roll-up etc. These were all thanks to The Document Foundation’s supports! You can find detailed information about the event from here : https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Events/2018/OYLG2018
  • Watching the Detectives
    For instance, Kevin Ottens has been writing about understanding the KDE community by the “green blobs” method, showing who is active when. Lays Rodrigues has written about using Gource to show Plasma growing up. Nate Graham describes the goings-on in the KDE community nearly every week. Those are, roughly: a metric-, a visual-, and a story-based approach to understanding the community, over different timescales. But understanding of a system doesn’t come from a single dimension, from a single axis of measurement. It comes from mixing up the different views to look the system as a whole.
  • Managing cooking recipes
    I like to cook. And sometimes store my recipes. Over the years I have tried KRecipes, kept my recipes in BasKet notes, in KJots notes, in more or less random word processor documents. I liked the free form entering recipes in various notes applications and word processor documents, but I lacked some kind of indexing them. What I wanted was free-ish text for writing recipes, and some thing that could help me find them by tags I give them. By Title. By how I organize them. And maybe by Ingredient if I don’t know how to get rid of the soon-to-be-bad in my refridgerator.