Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

openSUSE Election Committee Founded

Filed under
SUSE We now have founded an openSUSE Election Committee. The openSUSE election committee will organize and oversee the first openSUSE Board election, the board has authorized it to decide any open questions on the elections.

DRM Patches For Linux 2.6.27 Kernel

Filed under
Linux While the merge window for the Linux 2.6.27 kernel has already closed, we will hopefully see a few more Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) patches.

Red Hat fesses up to Fedora FOSS security fiasco

Filed under
Security A week or so ago, end users of the Linux-based Red Hat Fedora OS were warned to avoid downloading packages due to an "issue in the infrastructure systems" which waved big red flags suggesting a security breach to many industry observers.

25 killer Linux apps

Filed under
Software We all know that Linux is about choice. Everyone has the choice of what they use and how they use it. A consequence of this is that there's a huge range of software out there. We'll highlight some of the choices available to you for some of the most common desktop tasks.

Review: Kubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 4

Filed under
Ubuntu I'm going to look at Kubuntu 8.10 Alpha 4, an often overlooked distribution due to Ubuntu stealing most of the limelight (and don't forget Xubuntu, which stands in the shadow of both Ubuntu and Kubuntu).

ext3 with data=journal results

Filed under

kmandla.wordpress: I’ve been toying with a minimal Ubuntu installation identical to the one I built for the Hardy speed guide, but this time I used data=journal as a flag for the default ext3 filesystem.

PCLinuxOS 2008 MiniME - Beauty Meets Beast

Filed under

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: I have long been performance-hungry, and I don't mind spending hours in tinkering my desktop/laptop for maximum speed and performance. During my long 15 years of tweaking and tinkering I found PCLinuxOS 2008 MiniME to be the best, because it has already been tweaked and tested for me.

Downgrade to XP or Upgrade to Mandriva

Filed under
MDV My friend wanted a low cost Laptop and went for Dell 1525. Here in Singapore, it is really a value for money Notebook. Everything is OK with this Laptop, just one issue- It has Vista Basic. We discussed his problem and came with two possible alternatives:

odds & ends (leftovers)

Filed under
  • The Hacker Test: More Linux and Unix Humor

  • Docunification
  • Freezy Linux is a free, easy-to-use Linux-based operating system
  • Zimbra Adds Support for Ubuntu 8.04
  • The Origins of Linux - Linus Torvalds

IS Ubuntu Hardy really THAT buggy ?

Filed under
Ubuntu Blogsphere and forums are full of post saying that hardy is much more buggy than Gutsy or any other previous release. Come on this is a LTS release, how can this be so buggy ? Lets take a look at some of the posts

and a few more

Filed under
  • Short Tip: Compare revisions with SVN

  • How to split screen your command line
  • Installing and Running sendmail in Red Hat Linux
  • How I repaired a corrupted grub menu.lst config file
  • Using more than 4 GB RAM on Debian etch 32bit

few more howtos:

Filed under
  • How to Enable extra compiz fusion effects in Mandriva Linux

  • Compile the Kernel on Debian etch
  • Blackberry tethering in Mandriva with barry-ppp

An Inside look at Debian -- Chatting with DPL Steve McIntyre

Filed under
Interviews Down in Argentina I grabbed some time with Steve McIntyre, Debian's 11th project leader since its founding 15 years ago. Steve has been on the job since April of this year and I checked in to see how it was going.

Fedora vs. Ubuntu

Filed under

snemir.blogspot: With a short break between the classes, I decided to try to install Ubuntu and Fedora Core 9 on my laptop to compare the two...

Top Five Linux Distros

Filed under
Linux Lots of distributions, of course using Linux is nightmare for the windows users and selecting the right distribution is a much greater nightmare, thousands of distros to choose from. And the best way is to look for the distribution that suits you the most. Here are some of the top linux distros.

What is Top 10 of Ubuntu-based Linux Distributions

Filed under
Ubuntu I want to know what is the top 10 of Ubuntu-based Linux Distributions shown in the following list. VnTutor Blog help me really to explore Ubuntu World. Heads up to VnTutor

AntiX 7.5 is Now Available

Filed under
Linux Anti and MEPIS announce the release of antiX MEPIS 7.5, "Toussaint Louverture." New features based on community contributions are led by the antiX Control Centre, which provides a single handy place for managing desktop, system, network, and hardware.

5 Least Popular Desktop Environments for Linux

Filed under
Software KDE, GNOME, and Xfce are without doubt the most well-known desktop environments for Linux at the moment. They are utilized by majority of Linux Distributions simply because they are very much stable and usable. But did you know that there are other capable Free and Open-source desktop environments that you probably haven’t heard of?

few howtos:

Filed under
  • Learning Linux Chmod Using Numbers

  • Linux - Getting the Correct Time
  • BASH: Prepend A Text / Lines To a File
  • How to set Virtual Box in Full screen Mode?
  • Optimizing the Ubuntu Boot Process

few bloggings

Filed under
  • Mint Linux, working straight out of the box

  • Ubuntu 8.04.1 on my Aspire One
  • Ubuntu On My Macbook
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: KDE


  • 4 Useful Cinnamon Desktop Applets
    The Cinnamon desktop environment is incredibly popular, and for good reason. Out of the box it offers a clean, fast and well configured desktop experience. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make it a little better with a few nifty extras. And that’s where Cinnamon Applets come in. Like Unity’s Indicator Applets and GNOME Extensions, Cinnamon Applets let you add additional functionality to your desktop quickly and easily.
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest
    The hackfest is aimed to raise the standard of the overall core experience in GNOME, this includes the core apps like Documents, Files, Music, Photos and Videos, etc. In particular, we want to identify missing features and sore points that needs to be addressed and the interaction between apps and the desktop. Making the core apps push beyond the limits of the framework and making them excellent will not only be helpful for the GNOME desktop experience, but also for 3rd party apps, where we will implement what they are missing and also serve as an example of what an app could be.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 21
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 335 commits, with 13631 lines added and 37699 lines removed.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Puppet Unveils New Docker Build and Phased Deployments
    Puppet released a number of announcements today including the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build and a new version of Puppet Enterprise, which features phased deployments and situational awareness. In April, Puppet began helping people deploy and manage things like Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and CoreOS. Now the shift is helping people manage the services that are running on top of those environments.
  • 9 reasons not to install Nagios in your company
  • Top 5 Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    At LinuxCon Europe in Berlin I gave a talk about Kubernetes titled "Why I love Kubernetes? Top 10 reasons." The response was great, and several folks asked me to write a blog about it. So here it is, with the first five reasons in this article and the others to follow. As a quick introduction, Kubernetes is "an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications" often referred to as a container orchestrator.
  • Website-blocking attack used open-source software
    Mirai gained notoriety after the Krebs attack because of the bandwidth it was able to generate — a record at well over 600 gigabits a second, enough to send the English text of Wikipedia three times in two seconds. Two weeks later, the source code for Mirai was posted online for free.
  • Alibaba’s Blockchain Email Repository Gains Technology from Chinese Open Source Startup
    Onchain, an open-source blockchain based in Shanghai, will provide technology for Alibaba’s first blockchain supported email evidence repository. Onchain allows fast re-constructions for public, permissioned (consortium) or private blockchains and will eventually enable interoperability among these modes. Its consortium chain product, the Law Chain, will provide technology for Ali Cloud, Alibaba’s computing branch. Ali Cloud has integrated Onchain’s Antshares blockchain technology to provide an enterprise-grade email repository. Onchain provides the bottom-layer framework for Ali Cloud, including its open-source blockchain capabilities, to enable any company to customize its own enterprise-level blockchain.
  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround. For some reason, Netflix still expects Silverlight when it detects the user is running Firefox, despite the fact that the latest Firefox builds for Linux now support the HTML5 DRM plugin.
  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    The primary focus of this article is on the use, configuration, and optimization of PostgreSQL and EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server running on the IBM® Power Systems™ servers featuring the new IBM POWER8® processor technology. Note: The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.2 operating system was used. The scope of this article is to provide information on how to build and set up of PostgreSQL database from open source and also install and configure EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on an IBM Power® server for better use. EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on IBM Power Systems running Linux® is based on the open source database, PostgreSQL, and is capable of handling a wide variety of high-transaction and heavy-reporting workloads.
  • Valgrind 3.12 Released With More Improvements For Memory Debugging/Checking
  • [Valgrind] Release 3.12.0 (20 October 2016)
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform [Ed: If it’s openwashing, then no doubt Microsoft is involved]
  • LLVM Still Looking At Migration To GitHub
    For the past number of months the LLVM project has been considering a move from their SVN-based development process to Git with a focus on GitHub. That effort continues moving forward.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released With File Manager Improvements
    Lumina is a lightweight Qt-based desktop environment for BSD and Linux. We show you what's new in its latest release, and how you can install it on Ubuntu.
  • Study: Administrations unaware of IT vendor lock-in
    Public policy makers in Sweden have limited insight on how IT project can lead to IT vendor lock-in, a study conducted for the Swedish Competition Authority shows. “An overwhelming majority of the IT projects conducted by schools and public sector organisations refer to specific software without considering lock-in and different possible negative consequences”, the authors conclude.
  • How open access content helps fuel growth in Indian-language Wikipedias
    Mobile Internet connectivity is growing rapidly in rural India, and because most Internet users are more comfortable in their native languages, websites producing content in Indian languages are going to drive this growth. In a country like India in which only a handful of journals are available in Indian languages, open access to research and educational resources is hugely important for populating content for the various Indian language Wikipedias.
  • Where to find the world's best programmers
    One source of data about programmers' skills is HackerRank, a company that poses programming challenges to a community of more than a million coders and also offers recruitment services to businesses. Using information about how successful coders from different countries are at solving problems across a wide range of domains (such as "algorithms" or "data structures" or specific languages such as C++ or Java), HackerRank's data suggests that, overall, the best developers come from China, followed closely by Russia. Alarmingly, and perhaps unexpectedly, the United States comes in at 28th place.

OSS in the Back End

  • AtScale Delivers Findings on BI-Plus-Hadoop
    Business intelligence is the dominant use-case for IT organizations implementing Hadoop, according to a report from the folks at AtScale. The benchmark study also shows which tools in the Haddop ecosystem are best for particular types of BI queries. As we've reported before, tools that demystify and function as useful front-ends and connectors for the open source Hadoop project are much in demand. AtScale, billed as “the first company to allow business users to do business intelligence on Hadoop,” focused its study on the strengths and weaknesses of the industry’s most popular analytical engines for Hadoop – Impala, SparkSQL, Hive and Presto.
  • Study Says OpenStack at Scale Can Produce Surprising Savings
    Revenues from OpenStack-based businesses are poised to grow by 35 percent a year to more than $5 billion by 2020, according to analysts at 451 Research. In its latest Cloud Price Index, 451 Research analyzes the costs associated with using various cloud options to determine when it becomes better value to use a self-managed private cloud instead of public or managed cloud services. The idea is to createa complex pricing model that takes into consideration the major factors impacting total cost of ownership (TCO), including salaries and workload requirements.The 451 study found that because of the prevalence of suitably qualified administrators, commercial private cloud offerings such as VMware and Microsoft currently offer a lower TCO when labor efficiency is below 400 virtual machines managed per engineer. But where labor efficiency is greater than this, OpenStack becomes more financially attractive. In fact, past this tipping point, all private cloud options are cheaper than both public cloud and managed private cloud options.
  • How OpenStack mentoring breaks down cultural barriers
    Victoria Martinez de la Cruz is no stranger to OpenStack's mentorship opportunities. It's how she got her own start in OpenStack, and now a few years later is helping to coordinate many of these opportunities herself. She is speaking on a panel on mentoring and internships later this week at OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, Spain. In this interview, we catch up with Victoria to learn more about the details of what it's like to be a part of an open source internship, as well as some helpful advice for people on both sides of the mentoring process.