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Friday, 01 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Mac is the first to fall in Pwn2Own hack contest

Filed under
OS

channelregister.co.uk: A brand-new MacBook Air running a fully patched version of Leopard was the first to fall in a contest that pitted the security of machines running OS X, Vista and Linux. The exploit took less than two minutes to pull off.

Full Circle Magazine Issue 11 Out

Filed under
Ubuntu

It’s time again! Issue #11 is out - one more until our 1 year anniversary. This month: Linux Mint vs Ubuntu, Review of an old Lenovo 3000 C200 laptop running Ubuntu, and Howto: iPod Classic & Amarok.

15 Open-Source Business Influencers

Filed under
OSS

eweek.com: The influence of the open-source model on software development is increasing. Here, eWEEK names 15 people driving this IT revolution.

Put your Linux Distro on a Live CD

Filed under
Linux

makeuseof.com: An oddity of open source operating systems is the Live CD. These live systems are full versions of the operating system that run completely from the given medium. Live CDs originally came from the old boot-disk-for-diagnosis idea. Live CDs have now become a way to test-drive a distro before installing it.

more OOXML coverage

Filed under
OSS
  • UK may make last-minute U-turn on OOXML

  • Kenya Changes From Yes to Abstain! Denmark Says No; EU Commission Investigating Poland
  • President of EU Academy for Standardisation criticizes OOXML, says duplicative standards conflict with WTO rules
  • Germany Stays in the OOXML "Yes" Column
  • Oh Miguel...
  • OOXML Vote Coverage

Red Hat Revenue Outlook Tops Forecasts

Filed under
Linux

reuters.com: Red Hat Inc issued a revenue outlook on Thursday that topped Wall Street forecasts, saying that its business software is poised for strong growth in a weak economy because it costs less than rival products.

Open source and the shrinking waterhole

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: Despite a lot of brave talk at OSBC there is little doubt that open source is heading into its first recession. This recession starts just as many open source vendors are starting to look beyond their own forges for sales. I’ve heard people say they’re even hiring salesmen.

Linux Live CDs: A Convenient Approach to Personal Computing

Filed under
Linux

desicritics.org: Linux platform for computing is difficult to understand for an average personal computer user, the traditional Microsoft Windows Operating System users especially find it inconvenient with excessive amount of options Linux presents. I would like to focus on Linux Live CDs as a way for an individual computer user to simplify computing.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Solved: Desktop Recording with Sound

  • How To Backup Your iPod Music on Linux
  • How To Use Filezilla As An SFTP Client
  • Automatic FTP Backup System - A Very Simple Solution
  • Introduction BackupPC
  • How to create a shortcut in your desktop?
  • Top Tip: How do I remove Grub?
  • Four Table Tips for OpenOffice Writer

Custom Compiz Effects in Ubuntu 8.04

Filed under
Software

tombuntu.com: Installed CompizConfig Settings Manager and are wondering where the custom visual effects setting has gone? The way this works has changed in Ubuntu 8.04.

The Best Linux Marketing Tip: Don’t Mention Linux

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: The VAR Guy wasn’t looking for love, but he found it during a trip to his local CostCo last night. There, he spotted the $299 Eee PC from Asus. It’s built on Linux — but CostCo’s in-store promotional materials for the device barely mention Linux. That may be a smart move. Here’s why.

Battle of the Beasts: Wolvix vs. Pardus

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Another exciting month has almost passed. So far, I tried and tested two equally fantastic and capable Linux distributions. Wolvix 1.1.0 and Pardus 2007.3 are well-crafted distros that truly deserve some attention. Some might ask which one is better between the two. There’s only one way to find out.

Yahoo is the Reason for Microsoft's New Open Source Stance

Filed under
Microsoft

ostatic.com: It's not every day that a Microsoft executive as highly placed as senior vice president, corporate secretary and general counsel Brad Smith shows up at an open source conference, but he made an appearance at the Open Source Business Conference in San Francisco this week. What people keep missing is how Microsoft's proposed Yahoo deal would force it to embrace open source.

Gentoo - Utilities tmpwatch and flagedit

Filed under
Software

linuxtidbits.wordpress: Gentoo users eventually branch out from the utilites Portage gives to do more advanced tasks, quicker. There are a good number of these utilites in the Portage tree including tmpwatch and flagedit.

Filing US federal taxes under Linux

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Filling out tax returns has traditionally been an area where Linux comes up short compared to the proprietary platforms, but you actually have several options for using commercial income tax products on a Linux platform. Here's a quick look.

I switched to Linux

Intel Core 2 Duo T9300

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: For a year now Intel has been flaunting its 45nm "Penryn" processor core with its SSE4 instruction set, High-K metal gate transistors, and 6MB of L2 cache. We have compared its performance against earlier Centrino-based ThinkPads as we look at how this latest Intel processor performs with Ubuntu Linux.

Ten tips for new Ubuntu users

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntuland.nireblog: Ubuntu has become the most popular Linux distribution for new Linux users. It's easy to install, easy to use, and usually "just works." But moving to a different operating system can be confusing, no matter how well-designed it is. Here's a list of tips that might save you some time.

Texmaker tames LaTeX

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Texmaker is an editor for the document markup language LaTeX. It lets you concentrate on the content of a document, while the underlying LaTeX engine takes care of the layout. Whether you are experienced with LaTeX or just starting out, Texmaker makes LaTeX easier to tame.

Compiz Fusion Community News for 25th March 2008

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: Welcome to yet another edition of the Compiz Fusion Community News, lots of cool new things for you to try out this time. This time we’ve got a few bugfixes, a sleek new curved expo mode, screenlets supporting web-based widgets and a re-write of the Wallpaper plugin.

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More in Tux Machines

4MLinux 18.0 Distro Released with Support for LibreOffice 5.2, Thunderbird 45.1

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki has just informed Softpedia today, July 1, 2016, about the immediate availability for download of the final release of the 4MLinux 18.0 operating system. Read more

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • Not Love
    I had seen GNU/Linux once before in my life. At a previous school, the husband of one of the teachers installed it on a PC in my presence. He couldn’t get it working…. Still, I read that GNU/Linux did not crash. I needed that. I was willing to make the effort to download and install GNU/Linux if I could have only that. Our Internet connection was a few KB/s on dial-up… I spent two weekends and five evenings downloading an .iso CD-image with FileZilla or something on a Mac in the lab. I had never burned a CD before but tried once copying the file to the CD. That wouldn’t boot. I discovered CD imaging… So, on the second try, I had a CD that would boot on the machines. I first did one machine and it wouldn’t start X. Having never seen X before, this was a problem but it turned out all I needed was the scanning frequencies for the CRT in a configuration file. Google helped me find those for each of my five different kinds of monitors. Suddenly, the PCs were useful with GNU/Linux.
  • Linux Under the Hood: Silence of the RAM
    Now that I see the events of the last week chronicled clearly in front of my very eyes, maybe the disparaging old junk man was right after all. I’m shameless enough to admit my own idiocy as long as it leads to learning from my mistakes. Maybe Linux isn’t rocket science, but installing RAM was sure beginning to feel like it.
  • Check out our new issue plus win an ebook bundle!
  • 30 days in a terminal: Day 10 — The experiment is over
    When I set out to spend 30 days living entirely in a Linux terminal, I knew there was a distinct possibility I would fail utterly. I mean, 30 days? No GUI software? No Xorg? Just describing it sounds like torture. And torture it was. Mostly. Some moments, though, were pretty damned amazing. Not amazing enough to help me reach my 30-day goal, mind you. I fell short—only making it to day 10.
  • Bad Voltage Episode 70 Has Been Released: Delicious Amorphous Tech Bubble
  • Tokyo: Automotive Linux Summit
    Engineers will gather in Tokyo July 13-14 for the annual Automotive Linux Summit, a conference where auto-industry stakeholders discuss the adoption of an open-source Linux-based platform for in-vehicle infotainment. The two-day summit brings together automotive systems engineers, Linux experts, developers and other players.
  • Oxenfree, an adventure game with supernatural elements, available on Linux
    This well-received indie title has been ported over to Linux. Combining plenty of elements of 80s teen movies and packaging them in a polished adventure, Oxenfree may be worth checking out if you’re a fan of adventure games.
  • Space station management game, The Spatials: Galactology, is confirmed to be coming for Linux
    This is an expanded and reimagined version of the management sim, The Spatials. It’s yet to be released but the developers have confirmed that a Linux version is in the works.
  • Red Hat Storage VP sees different uses for Ceph, Gluster
    Red Hat Storage showed off updates to its Ceph and Gluster software and laid out its strategy for working with containers at this week’s Red Hat Summit in San Francisco.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Leftovers: OSS

  • Google and GitHub are Opening a New Window on Open Source
    Where can you find millions of open source code repositories? That would be on GitHub, of course, and with all those code repositories, one would think that analyzing them would lead to some interesting conclusions about open source in general, correct? That's the thinking behind a new offering from GitHub in partnership with Google. The two have produced a new open dataset on Google BigQuery, a low cost analytics data warehouse service in the cloud, so that anyone can get data-driven insights based on more than 2.8 million open source GitHub repositories. The move brings new data analytics capabilities to BigQuery.
  • Open Source Gospel From Cisco’s Lauren Clooney
    Companies that traditionally focused on proprietary software are now playing catch up in order to compete by utilizing open source development.
  • My condolences, you’re now the maintainer of a popular open source project
    Marc Andreessen, creator of the Netscape web browser, famously said "software is eating the world." I’d like to posit that it’s actually open source software that’s eating the world, and I have a couple of data points to back me up. First, a conclusion from the 2015 Future of Open Source survey: “Seventy-eight percent of respondents said their companies run part or all of its operations on OSS and 66 percent said their company creates software for customers built on open source. This statistic has nearly doubled since 2010.”
  • Tip: Try these open-source investigative journalism tools
    The Investigative Reporters and Editors conference took place in mid-June in New Orleans, and one of the sessions at the event looked at open-source tools for investigations. This 'Steal my tool' session highlighted a number of useful open-source investigative platforms, which Sam Berkhead, engagement editor at IJNet, listed in this article published after the conference.
  • DuckDuckGo: The Little Search Engine That Gives Back Big
    The company’s website says, “DuckDuckGo is a general purpose search engine that is intended to be your starting place when searching the Internet. Use it to get way more instant answers, way less spam and real privacy, which we believe adds up to a much better overall search experience.” [...] Proprietor Gabriel Weinberg says his once-personal project (founded in 2008) isn’t making anyone wealthy, but he and his workers live decently, and he says they’re doing well enough that giving money to open source projects doesn’t hurt their budget.
  • Understanding open source licenses
    Open source licenses are licenses that comply with the Open Source Definition — in brief, they allow software to be freely used, modified, and shared. To be approved by the Open Source Initiative (also known as the OSI), a license must go through the Open Source Initiative’s license review process. There has been an increase release of open source software from the day of Linux. Today most popular frame works like bootstrap and software such as Atom IDE used by developers are open source. We often never worry about using open source code but do you know what the license under which the frame you’re using was released means?
  • Build your own open source solar panels
    Do-it-yourself electricity generation is still difficult and expensive. The inventors of the SunZilla project aim to make it easier, cleaner, portable, quiet, and completely open source. The SunZilla system is designed to replace diesel and gasoline-powered generators for portable and emergency power: camping, events, mobile phone charging station, provide power to refugee camps, or keep the lights on during a power outage. Two people can set it up in a few minutes. It is modular and plug-and-play. Leonie Gildein is one of the five SunZilla engineers, and kindly answered some questions about the project.
  • Lessons From The Downfall Of A $150M Crowdfunded Experiment In Decentralized Governance
    Hype around blockchain has risen to an all-time high. A technology once perceived to be the realm of crypto-anarchists and drug dealers has gained increasing popular recognition for its revolutionary potential, drawing billions in venture-capital investment by the world's leading financial institutions and technology companies. Regulators, rather than treating blockchain platforms (such as Bitcoin or Ethereum) and other "distributed ledgers" merely as tools of illicit dark markets, are beginning to look at frameworks to regulate and incorporate this important technology into traditional commerce.
  • Openfunds launches global standard for fund data interchange
    The standard is published on the openfunds website and can be used by anyone free of charge.