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Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GhostBSD 4.0 Beta 2 Released With MATE Goodness Rianne Schestowitz 27/06/2014 - 6:46pm
Story Oracle Linux 7.0 RC Uses XFS Filesystem and Has UEFI Support Rianne Schestowitz 27/06/2014 - 6:39pm
Story 'Open file formats must be implementable in open source' Rianne Schestowitz 27/06/2014 - 6:33pm
Story Canonical Fixes GnuPG Vulnerability in All Ubuntu-Supported OSes Rianne Schestowitz 27/06/2014 - 6:26pm
Story Is Antergos Arch Linux Really Faster Than Ubuntu, Fedora? Rianne Schestowitz 27/06/2014 - 6:17pm
Story Google Gives Developers Early Access to Android L Rianne Schestowitz 27/06/2014 - 6:00pm
Story Canonical Supporting IBM POWER8 for Ubuntu Cloud, Big Data Roy Schestowitz 27/06/2014 - 12:36pm
Story Open source is the fastest way to innovate big data Roy Schestowitz 27/06/2014 - 12:32pm
Story SteamOS: interviews and review Rianne Schestowitz 27/06/2014 - 11:46am
Story Sadly, Two X.Org GSoC Projects Already Failed Rianne Schestowitz 27/06/2014 - 11:37am

Kernel Log: What's new in 2.6.29 - Part 4: ACPI, PCI, PM – notebooks and power saving improvements

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Following a one-week pause due to the LCA 2009, Linus Torvalds restarted the integration of patches into the development branch a few days ago, and has now released the third pre-release version of 2.6.29.

Karaoke Software for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: Lately, I’ve been looking for a karaoke program that I can use on my Linux box. That’s why I bumped into this open source Python-powered karaoke software appropriately called PyKaraoke.

Did Linus Jump Too Soon?

Filed under
OSS

linuxjournal.com: One of the many great things about Linus is that he doesn't bottle it up: he speaks his mind on things that matter to him, without worrying overly about what others might say as a result. I want to explore the possibility that Linus decided to jump to GNOME at precisely the time when KDE could soon leapfrog it in important ways.

H & R Block Works with Linux

Filed under
Linux

lxer.com: Ah yes it is that time of year again for U.S. citizens. So when we started looking for an online tax tool that worked with Linux we were disappointed and surprised.

Is KDE 4.2 the Answer to the Linux Desktop?

Filed under
KDE

internetnews.com: A year after the first KDE 4.x Linux desktop release, developers now claim it's ready. Is the Linux desktop ready for mainstream users?

Damn Small Linux - Puppy's small brother

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: I guess I'm biased, but I have a soft spot when it comes to small-size distros. I like it when developers have the craftsmanship to bundle lots of great stuff into small, highly practical packages, proving that size matters not.

Kernel Log: New stable kernels, AMD 3D documentation and Mesa 7.3 released

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Over the last two weeks, the kernel developers have released versions 2.6.27.11, 2.6.27.12 and 2.6.28.1 of the stable kernel and at the weekend they added versions 2.6.27.13 and 2.6.28.2.

How Vista's total failure hurt Linux

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld.com: Once I got a good look at Vista, I knew desktop Linux was in for good times. What I hadn't expected though was that Vista would be such an absolute sales flop that Microsoft would actually reverse course and bring back XP.

Linux Distro Review - OzOS 0.9

Filed under
Linux

linux-hardcore.com: OzOS is a Linux operating system unknown, but marked by a desktop environment that is called Enlightenment. It's a system of which I heard about for the first time in the international forums of Dreamlinux. It's a derivative of Ubuntu.

OpenOffice 3.0.1 Released

Filed under
OOo

heise-online.co.uk: The OpenOffice.org project team have released OpenOffice 3.0.1 to the general public. Version 3.0.1 for Windows was leaked early by FileHippo on Monday, but now is officially available for download from the OpenOffice.org website and its mirrors.

The Net Net of Netbooks

Filed under
Hardware

computerworlduk.com: Netbooks have been one of the surprise successes over the last year. They have also been one of the most contentious areas of computing. There are conflicting reports on most aspects of the sector. It's good to have some figures – any figures – that might throw a little light on this promising sector.

KDE 4.2 installation/upgrade on Debian,Kbuntu and OpenSuse

Filed under
KDE
HowTos

linuxpoison.blogspot: The KDE Community announced the immediate availability of "The Answer", (a.k.a KDE 4.2.0), readying the Free Desktop for end users. KDE 4.2 builds on the technology introduced with KDE 4.0 in January 2008. After the release of KDE 4.1, which was aimed at casual users, the KDE Community is now confident we have a compelling offering for the majority of end users.

5 Things Mark Shuttleworth Has Learned about Organizational Change

Filed under
Ubuntu

cio.com: Mark Shuttleworth is not your average IT manager. A few weeks ago, he posted a question on an Ubuntu list. Not an order. Not a policy decision. A question: "Should we think about...?" he asked. Collaboration, community and teamwork are part of his personal style.

KDE 4.2 arrives, takes aim at free desktop 'answer'

Filed under
KDE

techworld.com.au: Almost a year to the day KDE 4 releases started with 4.0.0, the KDE project has been in damage control about how it handled the apparent developers release, but that all changed today with the second major release in the KDE 4 series, KDE 4.2.0, codenamed “the answer” aimed squarely at a whole new free desktop experience.

Also: KDE 4.2: I'm tired of Pundits, Here's MY Take

Ubuntu pocket guide and handy Linux tips

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.techrepublic.com: This week, it seems like everyone is writing about how Windows 7 spells the demise of Linux (or not) or, alternatively, how Linux has contributed to the decline of Microsoft. I figure we’ve got several weeks left to kick them around, though, don’t you? So with that in mind, I found some practical resources to highlight.

How To Choose The Best Linux For Your Business

Filed under
Linux

bmighty.com: For IT decision makers in small and midsize-businesses, Linux is all about choice. But the dizzying array of different distros, service, and support options can make the choice a challenge. This guide to understanding the differences will help you pick the distro your business needs.

NVIDIA Releases Four New Linux Drivers

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: The NVIDIA 180.22 Linux driver was released less than three weeks ago, but today NVIDIA has released a new 180.xx display driver update. In addition, NVIDIA has updated all three of their legacy display drivers.

Font Fun in OpenSolaris and Beyond

Filed under
OS

blogs.eweek.com: For the past few weeks, I've been running OpenSolaris 2008.11 on my main work notebook. One of the roughest edges I've found on my OpenSolaris installation is the system's font rendering within the Firefox Web browser.

KDE 4.2 Released

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: It has been a full year since the beginning of the KDE 4 series and today the KDE community proudly announces the release of KDE 4.2, "The Answer".

Also: Breathe KDE 4.2, Introducing Lancelot
And: My favourite KDE 4.2 feature: Task Bar And Window Grouping

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  • Austrian Schools
    Here it is 2017 and Austrian schools are using GNU/Linux and folks are still having problems with That Other OS in schools. I was in a similar situation back in 2000 when I first installed GNU/Linux in my classroom. TOOS didn’t work for me then and it still doesn’t work for schools today. Any time you have a monopolist telling you what you can and can’t do in your classroom, you’re going to have problems, especially if that monopolist isn’t particularly supportive of your objectives. In my case, M$ was celebrating its monopoly and didn’t even care if the software crashed hourly. I later discovered there were all kinds of evil consequences of the EULA from Hell, like limiting the size of networks without a server running their software and fat licensing fees.
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Security News

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Kaspersky: No whiff of Linux in our OS because we need new start to secure IoT [Ed: Kaspersky repeats the same anti-Linux rhetoric he used years ago to market itself, anti-Linux Liam Tung recycles]
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  • Reproducible Builds: week 95 in Stretch cycle
  • EU privacy watchdogs say Windows 10 settings still raise concerns
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Android Leftovers