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About Tux Machines

Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story openSUSE Review, Ubuntu Happenings, and Zorin OS Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 9:04am
Story Best Firefox Add-ons for Social Media Junkies Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 2:12am
Story Review: Manjaro Linux 0.8.9 (Cinnamon edition) Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 2:05am
Story Homerun 1.2.0 Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 1:53am
Story Linux Kernel 3.13 Gets Its First Update Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 1:46am
Story Will Android PCs finally destroy Windows on the desktop? Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 1:42am
Story Future Of Fedora Spins Is Questioned With Fedora.Next Roy Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 1:36am
Story Google-backed Developer Group condemns NSA over app spying Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 1:33am
Story Google to sell Motorola Mobility to Lenovo for $3 billion: Confirmed Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 1:27am
Story As free software users, we need to speak out against the TPP Roy Schestowitz 30/01/2014 - 1:23am

First Look: The gOS 3 Operating System

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Linux The gOS operating system is an open source Ubuntu derivative published by Emeryville, Calif.-based Good OS LLC. gOS gained fame when it showed up in a line of inexpensive computers sold at Wal-Mart. As a longtime Ubuntu user, I've known and used some of its derivatives, such as Kubuntu. However, this time, I decided to give gOS a spin.

To trust or not to trust Red Hat, that is the question

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Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: I like Linux. I like Red Hat and Fedora Linux. I use them every day. What I don't like, though, is not knowing what's what with the recent security break-in into the RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) and Fedora file servers.

When is open source just throwing it all away?

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OSS It has become a common sight. A market develops. A leader emerges. Then the laggards say “we’re open source.” It’s beginning to look like the throwing of a bad poker hand.

Super Micro C2SEA G45

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Hardware This time around we have our hands on the Super Micro C2SEA, which is a desktop motherboard that uses the Intel G45 Chipset and provides integrated GMA X4500 HD graphics.

Review: FaunOS 0.5.4

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Linux FaunOS is a light weight Linux distribution based on Arch Linux that is designed specifically for use on USB pen drives. It offers the user a complete KDE desktop experience without being too heavy or too light. But can a distribution such as FaunOS truly be user friendly, light weight and still complete?

Best among the rest

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Linux Now this is beyond doubt that Ubuntu is the most searched Linux distribution. Most websites/forums claim that Ubuntu is the most popular one. Okey, agreed that Ubuntu is the most popular; what about the rest ?

Attack of the GNU/Linux Ultraportables, Part 2

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Glyn Moody: As I noted the other day, ultraportables are not only hot, but they've changed the dynamics of the entire desktop sector. With the imminent arrival of the Dell effort in this sector, we've clearly reached a significant milestone, but that doesn't mean that things are going to get boring. Here's what marks the start of phase 2:

Mandriva : MIB Live Games 2008.1 released

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MDV Marcello Anni announced on Cooker ML the release of the MIB Live Games 2008.1. MIB ( Mandriva Italian Backports ) is a derived distribution of Mandriva Linux done by the Italian Mandriva community.

Kernel Log: New stable and pre-release kernels, Ubuntu 8.10 with 2.6.27?

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Linux The kernel developers have been busy in the last few days with several new Linux versions being released. Kernel versions and in the stable series have numerous fixes and minor improvements and some drivers.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 267

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This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Interviews: Kris Moore, PC-BSD lead developer

  • News: Fedora and Red Hat servers compromised - CentOS unaffected, Novell extends "interoperability" deal; openSUSE ads SELinux support, gNewSense celebrates second birthday, user-visible changes in NetBSD 5.0
  • Released last week: antiX MEPIS 7.5, gNewSense 2.1
  • Upcoming releases: Tentative release dates for FreeBSD 6.4, 7.1
  • Site news: Translation to Urdu, status reclassification
  • New additions: openmamba GNU/Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Swedish Television Rumored to Expose Microsoft’s Mojave Campaign

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Microsoft While everyone is talking about the fact that Jerry Sienfled has signed up to pitch Microsoft Vista it is worth noting another ad campaign that Microsoft launched last week entitled the “Mojave Experiment.”

openSUSE 11 - Desktop Emphasis

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superphysics.awardspace: I had said earlier that I was really going to put this one to the blade. Why? Because openSUSE 10.3 happens to be my favourite distro so far, and I was under the hope that this would be a good if not better. And I would test this with KDE 4, because that is the only real reason I would shift to 11.0 from 10.3.

Better bookmark tagging with HandyTag, Tagmarks, and TagSifter

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Moz/FF The bookmark tagging feature introduced in Firefox 3 is not particularly difficult in use: when bookmarking a Web page, enter the tags you like into the Tags field of the bookmarking dialog window and you are pretty much done. Tagging provides a more flexible way of keeping track of bookmarks than traditional folders.

today's leftovers

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  • Ubuntu Eee 8.04.1 release - live - Day 2

  • Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron - Second Chance, Wireless Works and was Easy
  • 3 Things in Linux you should NOT Install
  • Unix and Linux Online Language Translation Script
  • Open Source Software and Patents: An Uneasy Journey of Discovery and Understanding
  • Linux Outlaws 52 - Not Sponsored by Dell

some howtos:

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  • Reworking Shell Scripts

  • Easy File Sharing
  • HOWTO: Easy music sharing (or anything else you want)
  • Enable sendmail mailstats
  • Manage a Linux RAID 10 Storage Server
  • How To Install And Setup Jinzora Media Server In Ubuntu
  • 20 sureshot steps to install Ubuntu from USB
  • Using the Bcfg2 SSHbase plugin

First Impressions of Ubuntu 8.04

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randombloggings.wordpress: When I purchased a laptop a little over a year ago I wanted nothing to do with Vista. As a result I was determined to create a dual-boot setup with Windows XP (so I could play some games) and Ubuntu (so I could actually have a working system).

Open source still looking to shake off concerns

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OSS Although open source software has gained a place in enterprise networks alongside proprietary software, it can't seem to shake doubts about security and intellectual-property issues that have long dogged the movement.

EasyTag: a graphical interface to managing your music files’ tags

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Software EasyTag is a graphical utility to edit the descriptive ID3 tags for your music files. One will think primarily of MP3 files, but it also does other formats, such as Ogg, FLAC, MP4/AAC, MusePack, Monkey’s Audio files and WavPack files (APE tag).

Mozilla turbocharges Firefox, touts major speed gains

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Moz/FF Mozilla Corp. said Friday it has added the fruits of a two-month JavaScript turbo power project to the latest preview of its next browser, Firefox 3.1, that boosts some benchmark speeds by nearly 40 times over Firefox 3.0.

Greens urge end to software patents The Green Party has called for an overhaul of patent laws that would prevent software being patented. The party's policy on information technology was released by MP Metiria Turei.

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More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.