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Tuesday, 31 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Embedded DRM technology supports Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: Discretix has demonstrated its digital rights management (DRM) technology running on a Trolltech Qtopia-based Linux phone. The Discretix Multi-Scheme DRM Client can be used to establish a trusted environment for distributing premium content to devices with or without embedded cryptographic hardware co-processors, the company said.

Gearlog Radio: The Classmate PC Versus the OLPC XO

Filed under
Linux

gearlog.com: We're then joined first by Cisco Cheng, lead notebook analyst for PC Magazine. Cisco talks about his upcoming review (on PCMag.com) of the Classmate PC, Intel's answer to the OLPC XO laptop. We compare the two and also talk about the Asus Eee (and we learn how to pronounce "Asus").

Firefox 3.0 beta plugs hundreds of memory leaks, says Mozilla

computerworld.com: Firefox 3.0's memory consumption is "dramatically improved," claimed Mozilla Corp.'s chief engineer yesterday, because developers have aggressively attacked the open-source browser's notorious memory "leaks."

CloudBook Unboxing and Very First Impressions

Filed under
Linux

blog.laptopmag.com: Our CloudBook just arrived and we’ve taken it out of the box and snapped a few photos. Editor-in-Chief Mark Spoonauer is working on a hands-on post right now, and already we’ve encountered some significant problems:

Making music with M-Audio on Linux

Filed under
Software

linux.com: M-Audio has supplied hardware and software to computer-based musicians for 20 years. Its new "make-music-now" line of products, aimed at musicians just getting into computers or PC users with an interest in music, includes a microphone, speakers, drum machine, and DJ mixer deck.

Does open source software raise security issues?

Filed under
OSS

electronicsweekly.com: Pushing the boundaries of product design, manufacturers continually look to do more – features, functionality and processing power – in less space for less money. Fundamental to achieving these goals is the use of open source code.

Flipping the Linux switch: The anti-virus question

Filed under
Linux

downloadsquad.com: We were at a major electronics retailer a few days ago, gazing lovingly at the little ASUS Eee. We were not alone. They asked why the user interface wasn't as familiar as their home machine. "Linux," said the salesman. (He was ever so helpful.) The next question, "Does it come with anti-virus?"

KDE Utils: Falling in love all over again

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: Today we're going to look at the little tools in KDE4, or at least some of them. There are far too many to be able to cover in one blog entry, and so I've decided to cover a few of the ones that I personally use and which have had visible improvements over their KDE3 counterparts.

LiMo Foundation touts real mobile Linux

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: The LiMo foundation delivered a clear snub to Google's Android this week as it announced 18 handsets running its version of Linux at Mobile World Congress this week.

Free/Open-source IRC/IM Software

Filed under
Software

junauza.blogspot: Internet Relay Chat (IRC) is a form of real-time Internet chat or synchronous conferencing. Instant Messaging (IM) is a form of real-time communication between two or more people based on typed text over a network. I have here a long list of excellent free/open-source IRC and IM clients that you may want to try out.

Wx/Net - Weather monitoring for penguins

Filed under
Software

raiden's realm: In my periodical wanderings around the net, I sometimes stumble onto a number of rather unique and interesting applications. Wx/Net is one of them. The majority of people out there might not think that an open source application designed to interface with weather monitoring stations is all that exciting.

Where is Ubuntu headed, and why are Linux users upset?

Filed under
Ubuntu

ibeentoubuntu.blogspot: Seven years ago, I knew what every process running on my computer was. I could -- with confidence -- tell users exactly how to solve a problem which was occurring. That's not really true anymore. The changes that are happening upset a fair number of older users, but I think that even the ancient among us can respect what's being accomplished.

Doom and Gloom! Oh My! Linux Kernal in Trouble?

Filed under
Linux

tmgstudio.com: Nothing like a little doom and gloom to start the morning! The folks over at PC World think the sky is falling. "They could be exploited by malicious, *local* users to cause denial of service attacks, disclose potentially sensitive information or gain “root” privileges." Ooh, scary!

some shorts

Filed under
News
  • Opera accuses Mozilla of irresponsible disclosure

  • Kiba-Dock with AIGLX in KDE + Gentoo
  • AWN Manager - Applet Preferences gets an Overhaul
  • ATI R700 Series Gain ALSA HDMI Audio

People of openSUSE: Michael Meeks

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

news.opensuse: GNOME and full time OpenOffice.org developer Michael Meeks was invited by ‘People of openSUSE’ to an interview, and here are his answers! Just in case, if you will be in FOSDEM 2008 do not miss the opportunity to meet him there, and attend his talk in the openSUSE DevRoom.

Commercial Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

thetechandcents: I just read a post by Bruce Byfield, where he raises an interesting question: after the fact that Canonical will try and offer commercial software from a specific repository, would anyone use it? And if not, could it alienate other users of Ubuntu from using the distribution at all?

California firm buys Utah-based Linux

sltrib.com: A Silicon Valley company has bought the assets of Utah supercomputer maker Linux Networx Inc. for an undisclosed amount of stock.

Discover the possibilities of the /proc folder

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: The /proc directory is a strange beast. It doesn't really exist, yet you can explore it. Its zero-length files are neither binary nor text, yet you can examine and display them. By studying the /proc directory, you can learn how Linux commands work, and you can even do some administrative tasks.

Quick Review: Firefox 3 Beta 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

maketecheasier.com: Mozilla has released the latest beta of Firefox 3 for testers and early adopters. This latest beta includes many useful features and improved user interface.

How To Configure Remote Access To Your Ubuntu Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide explains how you can enable a remote desktop on an Ubuntu desktop so that you can access and control it remotely.

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today's leftovers

Red Hat News

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Leftovers: OSS

  • Quantifying Benefits of Network Virtualization in the Data Center
    Modern data centers have increased significantly in scale and complexity as compute and storage resources become highly virtualized. The rise of the DevOps style of application deployment means that data center resources must be agile and respond rapidly to changing workload requirements. Data center network technologies have been challenged to keep up with these rapidly evolving application requirements.
  • Apache Zeppelin Joins Several Other Projects Gaining Top-Level Status
    As we've been reporting, The Apache Software Foundation, which incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, has been elevating a lot of interesting new tools to Top-Level Status recently. The foundation has also made clear that you can expect more on this front, as graduating projects to Top-Level Status helps them get both advanced stewardship and certainly far more contributions. Only a few days ago, the foundation announced that a project called TinkerPop has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). TinkerPop is a graph computing framework that provides developers the tools required to build modern graph applications in any application domain and at any scale. Now, it has announced that Apache Zeppelin has graduated as well. Zeppelin is a web-based notebook that enables interactive data analytics.
  • 6 Open Source Operating Systems for the Internet of Things (IoT)
    Whether you are small to large enterprises, IoT is one of the useful technology that can help you to be connected on-the-go.
  • 6 open source architecture projects to check out
    The world of architecture doesn't change as quickly as software, but architects are still finding new ways to share innovative designs and ideas. The open source architecture movement aims to make architectural designs, drawings, 3D renderings, and documentation freely available for integration into other projects under open source licenses. It owes much of its growth to the growing popularity of the maker movement, DIY culture, 3D printing, and CNC machines, as well as support from architects like Alejandro Aravana.
  • Yorubaname.com has gone opensource, codebase now on GitHub
    Online dictionary for yoruba names, YorubaName, has now made its backlog accessible to the public. In a post on their blog, the guys at YorubaName announced that the website codebase is now on GitHub.
  • A New Version of Rust Hits the Streets
    Version 1.9 of the Rust programming language has been released. Rust is a new language with a small but enthusiastic community of developers.
  • Here's how you can make a career in OpenStack
    OpenStack is one of the biggest open source movements. It is a free and open-source software platform for cloud computing, mostly deployed as an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS). The software platform consists of interrelated components that control hardware pools of processing, storage, and networking resources throughout a data centre. According to the official website, hundreds of the world's largest brands rely on OpenStack to run their businesses every day, reducing costs and helping them move faster. OpenStack has a strong ecosystem globally.
  • Compatibility before purity: Microsoft tweaks .NET Core again [Ed: Microsoft lied about .NET going Open Source; just forked it into Open Core version]
    Microsoft's open source fork of the .NET platform, called .NET Core, will be modified for better compatibility with existing applications, says Program Manager Immo Landwerth in a recent post.
  • EMC Ships Open Source Tool for Cloud and IoT Devices
  • Watch Benjamin Hindman Co-Creator of Apache Mesos Speak Live Tomorrow at MesosCon [Ed: Microsoft proxy in a sense]
  • MesosCon Preview: Q&A with Twitter’s Chris Pinkham
  • How to secure your open source code [Ed: more marketing nonsense of Black Duck]
  • Luxembourg launches open data portal
    The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg officially launched its national open data portal data.public.lu on April 8th. This portal, supported by Digital Luxembourg, the government agency in charge of digital affairs in the country, was presented during the Game of Code hackathon.
  • Denmark to accelerate government digitisation
    Open standards The existing shared solutions are to be adopted by all authorities and public sector institutions where relevant, according to a presentation in English. “Shared solutions need to be stable, secure and user-friendly, they will also be easy to implement because the infrastructure is based on open standards.” The strategy, an agreement involving the government, regions and municipalities, was announced on 12 May. It includes 33 initiatives, which among other things deal with ease of use, reuse of data, IT architecture, growth, security and digital skills, DIGST says.