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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Raspberry Pi in schools Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2014 - 2:55am
Story Q4OS 0.5.11 Linux Distro Is an Almost Perfect Clone of Windows XP – Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2014 - 2:24am
Story GCC vs. LLVM Clang On NVIDIA's Tegra K1 Quad-Core Cortex-A15 Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2014 - 2:17am
Story INTRODUCING GTKINSPECTOR Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2014 - 2:06am
Story Arduino gets bigger—and smaller—at Maker Faire Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2014 - 1:35am
Story Screenshots of KDE Plasma Next beta 1 Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2014 - 1:26am
Story Red Hat brings OpenShift closer to the enterprise Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2014 - 1:18am
Story Calligra 2.8.3 Released Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2014 - 1:07am
Story Linux Deepin renamed to Deepin. Deepin 2014 beta released Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2014 - 1:00am
Story Open Data Support Training material to the next level Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2014 - 12:40am

Is Symbian any good?

Filed under
OS

blogs.zdnet.com: In all the talk about Nokia acquiring Symbian, setting up a foundation to support it and scouring the world for sales, one key question remains unanswered. Is the software any good?

Ubuntu 9.04 Home Encryption Performance

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: One of the exciting features that is being worked on for Ubuntu 9.04 is encrypted home directories. At the request of Canonical, we have carried out a few benchmarks showing what effect the Ubuntu 9.04 home encryption feature has on the system's overall performance.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 49

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Issue #49 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Andreas Jaeger: openSUSE 11.1 Goes RC2, Joe Brockmeier: Mounting remote directories using FUSE and sshfs on openSUSE, and Henne Vogelsang: What’s Working Well and What To Do With It.

Why the IBM Linux desktop will fail

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: If one was to believe IBM, the days of the Microsoft desktop are numbered, soon to be cut short by a combination of Canonical's Ubuntu Linux, IBM's Lotus range of office applications and a virtual desktop from Virtual Bridges. The trouble is IBM's solution is nothing new and addresses none of the issues associated with moving away from Microsoft.

Get your feet wet before taking the Linux plunge

Filed under
Linux

newsday.com: I recently promised you a strategy for a long-term exploration and transition to Linux and Open Source. This plan is for home use; organizational Linux is another issue. You also can follow this strategy to get some idea of how well a netbook will work before shelling out big bucks.

PCLinuxOS 2009 Beta 2 Thoughts and Screenshots

Filed under
PCLOS

benkevan.com/blog: With all the ranting and raving of PCLinuxOS 2007 I decided to give PCLinuxOS 2009 Beta 2 a shot. I started by downloading and launching the Live CD in a virtual machine.

Phoronix Benchmarking.. Statistically Significant?

Filed under
Linux

kev009.com: Phoronix has been cranking out a slew of benchmarks recently, pitting various different Linux distros against each other and even different operating systems with their own automated test suite. What I would like to know is… are they bullshit?

gcompris: educational suite for children

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: As a parent, have you ever wondered if kids can use FOSS to have fun and learn at the same time? As a teacher, have you ever wondered how to teach using a computer and FOSS tools? The answer is gcompris.

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • SFLC Receives Grant for Work in India

  • Running Linux on Windows XP
  • Unix and Linux Horror Stories
  • Interviews with teachers about OLPC benefits
  • Arch to Gentoo, back to Arch
  • Codec prevents computers from playing movies and music
  • Unix - System VI Release Notes - More Linux and Unix Humor
  • Netflix comes to Linux desktop
  • tasks widget and multi screen
  • Rotating your adult content
  • Linux Hater’s Redux... dead? Long live... Oiaohm?!
  • The Microsoftie Who Embraced the Dark Side (Open Source)
  • Software Goodies
  • Another Win For Ubuntu

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Repackage i386 deb for in lpia (for Dell Mini9)

  • Redirecting network traffic to a new IP using IPtables
  • Working with multimedia files - Part 3
  • Graduate From A Wubi Install To A Dedicated Partition
  • Search For Movies With Totem
  • Simple Wireless Network Manager in Ubuntu
  • Drupal to Wordpress migration
  • Ubuntu Tweak came to Fedora
  • Customizing Firefox to work faster in netbooks
  • Backup your Firefox Passwords
  • Auto Start Applications at Login to GNOME Desktop
  • Customizing Your Desktop in Ubuntu 8.10

Most Underhyped Apps of 2008

lifehacker.com: Now that you've seen all the big names and launches of 2008, it's time to give a nod to the apps that didn't get the attention they should have this past year.

PDF editing on linux

Filed under
Software

aldeby.org: PDF editing in linux is still somehow tricky nowadays. This post aims at putting together the currently available resources for manipulating PDF documents.

6 Diamonds in the Rough for Evaluating Open Source Apps

ostatic.com/blog: One of the most popular features offered here at OStatic is our database of over 150,000 open source projects, many of which include screenshot tours, and more. But where else can you look? Here are six good choices.

Ten embarrassing questions

Filed under
OS
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: I was reading a survey showing that only 2% of Obama voters (vs 35% of McCain voters) could correctly answer at least 11 of 12 simple questions like which party has been in charge of Congress for the last two years, when it occurred to me that there might be some interesting Wintel vs Lintel parallels here.

Opera 10.0 Alpha 1 on openSUSE 11.1 - Review

Filed under
Software

benkevan.com: I thought i’d give a quick review of Opera 10.0 Alpha 1 that I recently installed on my openSUSE 11.1 RC1 box.

OpenOffice skakes Microsoft

Filed under
OOo

australianit.news.com.au: IF THERE'S one thing in life that gives Steve Ballmer, Microsoft's abrasive chief executive, the shivers it's probably the existence of an outfit called OpenOffice.org.

Handbrake 0.93 released, capitulates on DVD decryption

cnet.com: Handbrake, the closest thing to entertainment manna we have, has released the newest version of its open-source DVD ripping software, version 0.93. There's just one problem: it no longer rips DVDs. At least, not the kind you'd want to rip.

Stage Two of Open Source Evolution

Filed under
OSS

itworld.com: We have always said that Open Source could likely follow the evolution pattern of the PC's introduction during the mainframe era. For those of us who believed in Open Source in the "birth" stage, we knew the day would come where nearly every firm would be using Open Source in some way. It would be the sign that we had achieved the magical second stage - The Toe Hold.

Alternate Linux desktops

Filed under
Software

linuxpoison.blogspot: Most Linux users are familiar with KDE and GNOME. If you have some old PC with minimum hardware and want to run GUI on it then in this case the list of window manager provided below will help you to chose one ..

Forensic investigation using free Linux tools

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux-tip.net: An administrator of a company has been accused of hoarding illegal material of questionable moral content on his company network system. You have been called upon to examine the suspect server and unearth evidence related to the said illegal material. Your boss have told you that you are not allowed to shutdown the server.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • Integrate Your Android Device With Ubuntu Using KDE Connect Indicator Fork
    KDE Connect is a tool which allows your Android device to integrate with your Linux desktop. With KDE Connect Indicator, you can use KDE Connect on desktop that support AppIndicators, like Unity, Xfce (Xubuntu), and so on.
  • FirstAid – PDF Help Viewer
    in the recent months, I didn’t find much time to spend on Kate/KTextEditor development. But at least I was now able to spend a bit more time on OpenSource & Qt things even during work time in our company. Normally I am stuck there with low level binary or source analysis work. [...] Therefore, as our GUIs are developed with Qt anyways, we did take a look at libpoppler (and its Qt 5 bindings), which is the base of Okular, too.
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-rc2 released
    After quite some delay, I finally assembled a second release candidate for KBibTeX 0.6.1. Version 0.6.1 will be the last release in the 0.6.x series.
  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM Next Month
    Next month is FOSDEM, the largest gathering of free software developers anywhere in Europe. FOSDEM 2017 is being held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th of February. Thousands of coders, designers, maintainers and managers from projects as popular as Linux and as obscure as Tcl/Tk will descend on the European capital Brussels to talk, present, show off and drink beer.

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?