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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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How To Choose The Best Linux For Your Business

Filed under
Linux

bmighty.com: For IT decision makers in small and midsize-businesses, Linux is all about choice. But the dizzying array of different distros, service, and support options can make the choice a challenge. This guide to understanding the differences will help you pick the distro your business needs.

NVIDIA Releases Four New Linux Drivers

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: The NVIDIA 180.22 Linux driver was released less than three weeks ago, but today NVIDIA has released a new 180.xx display driver update. In addition, NVIDIA has updated all three of their legacy display drivers.

Font Fun in OpenSolaris and Beyond

Filed under
OS

blogs.eweek.com: For the past few weeks, I've been running OpenSolaris 2008.11 on my main work notebook. One of the roughest edges I've found on my OpenSolaris installation is the system's font rendering within the Firefox Web browser.

KDE 4.2 Released

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: It has been a full year since the beginning of the KDE 4 series and today the KDE community proudly announces the release of KDE 4.2, "The Answer".

Also: Breathe KDE 4.2, Introducing Lancelot
And: My favourite KDE 4.2 feature: Task Bar And Window Grouping

10 ways to help users transition to Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: There’s no reason why switching to Linux should be traumatic for your users (or stressful for you). As Jack Wallen explains, you can set them up to succeed if you approach things the right way.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 56

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Issue #56 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue: FOSDEM 2009, Top 25 Most Dangerous Programming Errors, and Novell’s 2009 Technical Strategy and Process.

GCC Libraries Get Updated License Exception

Filed under
OSS

fsf.org: Today the Free Software Foundation (FSF), together with the GCC Steering Committee and the Software Freedom Law Center, announced the release of a new GCC Runtime Library Exception.

Mozilla contributes $100,000 to fund Ogg development

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica.com: Mozilla has given the Wikimedia Foundation a $100,000 grant intended to fund development of the Ogg container format and the Theora and Vorbis media codecs.

Q&A with Paul Frields at Red Hat

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

neowin.net: Just after Christmas, Neowin was given the chance for a community Q&A with Paul Frields of Red Hat. Paul has worked with Fedora since 2003, and became the Fedora Project Leader in January last year. Along with a few other things, Paul is also chairman of the Fedora Project Board, which makes decisions on how Fedora will move forward.

Images, hacking, and Xfce

Filed under
Software
  • The Linux Alternative Series: Image Editing

  • Top 10 Linux Hacking Tools
  • Xfce 4.6 Release Candidate 1 (Capybara) released

What do KDE 4.2 and Windows 7 have in common?

Filed under
KDE
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld: I tried, I really did, to like KDE 4.2 I really didn't like the early versions of KDE 4. I then tried KDE 4.1. I hated it. I kept getting told by people that I just didn't get it.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Remote Desktop Between Ubuntu/Linux and Windows, Part II

  • Full screen mode with toolbars in Opera
  • Inkscape Tutorial - Raised Lettering Effect
  • 7 tips how to make your computer healthy
  • List drives by UUID in Ubuntu

Desktop distros inch closer

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.com: MEPIS and Mandriva are moving closer to new releases of their Linux distributions, and a French project called Jolicloud has posted a screen (pictured) from its upcoming netbook distro. MEPIS posted SimplyMEPIS 8.0 RC2, and Mandriva released its second alpha for Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring.

Also: SimplyMEPIS 8.0 RC2: On the Home Stretch

Windows Kicks Linux to the Curb? You’ve got to be kidding

Filed under
Linux
  • Windows Kicks Linux to the Curb? You’ve got to be kidding

  • Linux to spend eternity in shadow of 'little blue E'
  • Microsoft's Netbook Woes Also Mean Linux Yays ... Right?
  • Linux dead at hands of Windows 7? Horse puckey!
  • No Linux killer

Torvalds, KDE 4, and the Media Circus

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: Just as KDE 4 is poised to prove itself with the user-friendly 4.2 release, the year-long controversy over the changes from the KDE 3 release has ignited again. This time, the spark was a interview comment by Linus Torvalds that he had switched to GNOME and thought that the KDE release had been mis-managed.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 287

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Report: Linux.conf.au 2009

  • News: Ubuntu and Fedora adopt ext4, Slackware prepares for KDE 4.2, Mandriva developers move to Red Hat, ClarkConnect reveals new features
  • Released last week: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3, Granular Linux 1.0
  • Upcoming releases: Pardus Linux 2008.2
  • Site news: Update on package management cheatsheet
  • New distribution: Bee Linux, Kuki Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

plasma is now plasma-desktop

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: When Plasma was first ripping its way out of my meandering thoughts, I was rather preoccupied with one thought only: "I need something that can improve on kicker ..." When I eventually added the desktop to that thinking I felt I was making progress and getting ambitious.

Linux Monday: command lines and vintage keyboards

Filed under
Linux

jdeeth.blogspot: If you're younger than about 30, you probably don't have much memory of the DOS prompt. And about the third thing you've heard about Linux is "you have to type in commands a lot."

Are you an "average" user?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: Everybody uses in their arguments the yardstick of the average user. This is the user that people measure the suitability of an operating system and form their arguments around. What exactly is an average user?

Linux Foundation Announces Formal Kick Off for “We’re Linux” Video Contest

Filed under
Linux

linux-foundation.org: The Linux Foundation (LF), the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux, today announced the formal launch of its “We’re Linux” video contest.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel News: Linux 4.10 in SparkyLinux, Wayland 1.13.0, and Weston 2.0 RC2

  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Lands in SparkyLinux's Unstable Repo, Here's How to Install It
    The trend of offering users the most recent Linux kernel release continues today with SparkyLinux, an open-source, Debian-based distribution that always ships with the latest GNU/Linux technologies and software versions. SparkyLinux appears to be the third distro to offer its users the ability to install the recently released Linux 4.10 kernel, after Linux Lite and Ubuntu, as the developers announced earlier that the Linux kernel 4.10 packages are now available from the unstable repository.
  • Wayland 1.13.0 Display Server Officially Released, Wayland 1.14 Lands in June
    Bryce Harrington, a Senior Open Source Developer at Samsung, announced today the release and general availability of the Wayland 1.13.0 for GNU/Linux distributions that already adopted the next-generation display server.next-generation display server. Wayland 1.13.0 has entered development in the first days of the year, but the first Alpha build arrived at the end of January, along with the Alpha version of the Weston 2.0 compositor, including most of the new features that are present in this final release that you'll be able to install on your Linux-based operating systems in the coming days.
  • Weston 2.0 RC2 Wayland Compositor Arrives With Last Minute Fixes
    While Wayland 1.13 was released today, Bryce Harrington today opted against releasing the Weston 2.0 reference compositor and instead issue a second release candidate. Weston 2.0 is the next version of this "playground" for Wayland compositor technologies since the new output configuration API had broke the ABI, necessitating a break from the same versioning as Wayland.
  • [ANNOUNCE] weston 1.99.94

KDE Leftovers

  • Fedora 25 KDE: disappointing experience
    Fedora is not a frequent guest on the review deck of Linux notes from DarkDuck blog. The most recent review was of Fedora 22 back in July 2015. That was a review of the GNOME version, the most native for Fedora. You are probably aware of the tight link between the GNOME project and RedHat, the Fedora Project main sponsor.
  • [Video] Ubuntu 17.04 Unity 8 - KDE apps native on Mir
  • Plasma in a Snap?
    Shortly before FOSDEM, Aleix Pol asked if I had ever put Plasma in a Snap. While I was a bit perplexed by the notion itself, I also found this a rather interesting idea. So, the past couple of weeks I spent a bit of time here and there on trying to see if it is possible.
  • QStringView Diaries: Advances in QStringLiteral
    This is the first in a series of blog posts on QStringView, the std::u16string_view equivalent for Qt. You can read about QStringView in my original post to the Qt development mailing-list, follow its status by tracking the “qstringview” topic on Gerrit and learn about string views in general in Marshall Clow’s CppCon 2015 talk, aptly named “string_view”.
  • Making Movies with QML
    One of the interesting things about working with Qt is seeing all the unexpected ways our users use the APIs we create. Last year I got a bug report requesting an API to set a custom frame rate for QML animations when using QQuickRenderControl. The reason was that the user was using QQuickRenderControl as an engine to render video output from Qt Quick, and if your target was say 24 frames per second, the animations were not smooth because of how the default animation driver behaves. So inspired by this use case I decided to take a stab at creating such an example myself.
  • How to Create a Look and Feel Theme
  • United Desktop Theme for KDE Plasma 5.9
  • KDE Talks at FOSDEM
    The continuation of the original talk from Dirk Hohndel and Linus Torvalds about the port of Subsurface from Gtk to Qt, now with mobile in mind.

SteamVR for Linux, Benchmarks of HITMAN on NVIDIA

  • SteamVR for Linux is now officially in Beta
    Valve have put up SteamVR for Linux officially in Beta form and they are keen to stress that this is a development release. You will need to run the latest Steam Beta Client for it to work at all, so be sure to opt-in if you want to play around with it.
  • Valve Publishes A SteamVR Developer Build For Linux
    Valve has begun rolling out their SteamVR Linux support by announcing today a beta/developer build of their VR support for Linux. Valve's SteamVR for Linux page was updated today to reflect the build becoming public via the Steam beta channel, "This is a development release. It is intended to allow developers to start creating SteamVR content for Linux platforms. Limited hardware support is provided, and pre-release drivers are required. Linux support is currently only available in the "beta" branch, make sure you are using SteamVR[beta] before reporting issues."
  • HITMAN Linux Benchmarks On 12 NVIDIA GPUs
    Last week Feral Interactive released the much anticipated port of HITMAN for Linux. While at first it didn't look like this Linux game port would work out for our benchmarking requirements, thanks to Feral it does indeed work for another interesting Linux gaming test perspective. For our initial HITMAN Linux benchmarks are tests from 12 NVIDIA GeForce GPUs while our Radeon tests will come tomorrow.

Meet Flint OS, a Chromium OS Fork for Raspberry Pi & PCs That Runs Android Apps

Will Smith from Flint Innovations Limited is informing Softpedia today about their up and coming Linux-based operating system for PCs and Raspberry Pi devices, Flint OS, based on the open-source Chromium OS project. These days, we see more and more developers and entrepreneurs launching new operating systems based on Chromium OS, which Google uses with much success for its Chrome OS on many Chromebooks that you can purchase today. But Flint OS is somehow a bit special, not only because it provides support for both Raspberry Pi SBCs and x86 computers with either Intel or Nvidia GPUs, but because it uses Android apps. Read more Also: KaOS 2017.02 Is Out with Linux 4.9.10, KDE Plasma 5.9.2, and X.Org Server 1.19.1