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Saturday, 25 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Quad-core ARM TV-PC dual boots Android and Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 27/04/2015 - 7:24am
Story Q4OS 1.2 final Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2015 - 7:22am
Story Debian 8 Jessie Is an LTS Release, Supported for the Next 5 Years Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2015 - 7:20am
Story Mageia 5 RC is Out: A Quick Test Drive Roy Schestowitz 27/04/2015 - 7:15am
Story Debian 9.0 (Stretch) Already Planned, First Point Release for Debian 8.0 in a Month Rianne Schestowitz 27/04/2015 - 1:38am
Story Stellarium Is the Best Free Astronomic Observatory on Linux Rianne Schestowitz 26/04/2015 - 7:17pm
Story Ubuntu 15.04 Users Can Switch Off Systemd and Use Upstart Rianne Schestowitz 26/04/2015 - 7:13pm
Story First Jessie based Debian Edu beta release Rianne Schestowitz 26/04/2015 - 7:08pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots and Screencasts Roy Schestowitz 26/04/2015 - 4:28pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/04/2015 - 4:27pm

The importance of awesome

Filed under
Software

shanefagan.com: Im going to plug a bunch of projects and stuff I like in this post so I hope you guys like it.

Review: Firefox 3.6 brings joy to Web devs, not just users

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica.com: Mozilla's Firefox got a bit hotter today with the official release of version 3.6, a noteworthy update of the popular open source Web browser. It's an incremental improvement that introduces a modest assortment of new features and expands the browser's support for emerging Web standards.

Also: A Web user's diary: Opera 1, other browsers 0

Proprietary software in Ubuntu? – Good or bad?

Filed under
Ubuntu

openbytes.wordpress: The Ubuntu forums are running a survey about the option of having proprietary software in their software center for users to purchase if they wish. Whats interesting is the survey mentions Adobe Photoshop. So whats the problem?

Is Cedega Hanging in There?

Filed under
Gaming

jeffhoogland.blogspot: In one of my past articles I made a bold assessment that it appeared Transgaming might be dropping support for their Cedega Wine software. However it now appears that Cedega might be hanging in there -

London Stock Exchange begins migration to Linux-based trading platform

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: The London Stock Exchange has begun a twelve-month migration to its new trading platform, based on Linux, as trading fell sharply.

Firefox 3.6 is now available

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.zdnet.com: Several minutes ago, the Mozilla team shot me an email announcing the availability of Firefox 3.6. For an incremental update, Firefox 3.6 offers a good number of improvements and new features.

The Open-PC: one step closer to open-hardware

Filed under
Hardware

At the Gran Canaria Open Desktop Summit in July 2009, the Open-PC project was announced. The statement said the project aimed to “cooperatively design a Free Software based computer by and for the community”. Further this PC would use only hardware for which there are free software drivers available. This would be a PC with the minimal compromise required for running a free desktop. In January 2010 the project announced the launch of its first product.

Read the full article at Free Software Magazine.

KOffice - Portability in Action

Filed under
Software

ingwa2.blogspot: I have on several occasions been asked "why do you work on KOffice when OpenOffice.org already exists and does everything people need?". Well, there are several reasons.

Firefox, Opera downloads surge after IE security scare

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF

smh.com.au: Internet browsers Firefox and Opera have experienced a massive surge in downloads since the security flaw in Microsoft Internet Explorer 6 (IE6) was exposed.

Also: IE is so secure we just had to build an OS out of it

OOo: New Print UI now integrated

Filed under
OOo

blogs.sun.com: Barely one and a half years after the initial plan, a new print UI has now found its way into OpenOffice.org with the integration of CWS printerpullpages into the latest developer milestone DEV300m70.

Windows Update Does Not Like GRUB

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

zdnet.co.uk/blog: If you are running a multi-boot configuration with Windows and Linux, and using GRUB as the bootloader, you may be headed for trouble.

How To Set Up An SSL Vhost Under Apache2 On Ubuntu 9.10/Debian Lenny

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This article explains how you can set up an SSL vhost under Apache2 on Ubuntu 9.10 and Debian Lenny so that you can access the vhost over HTTPS (port 443). SSL is short for Secure Sockets Layer and is a cryptographic protocol that provides security for communications over networks by encrypting segments of network connections at the transport layer end-to-end. We use the mod_ssl Apache module here to provide strong cryptography for Apache2 via SSL by the help of the Open Source SSL toolkit OpenSSL.

Ode to Slackware

Filed under
Slack

slackstuff.com: I have a place reserved in my heart that only Slackware Linux fills. Strange as it might be, Slackware was the first Linux distribution that seemed to understand me and, I it. I recently read an article which brought to mind, the time that I started my venture into Linux.

How much is that software in the Windows?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

dwasifar.com: Recently I’ve been trading geekery with a gent in Pennsylvania who bought a copy of OS X Server to run on his Mac Mini. I was curious about this server software, so I looked into it. Three hundred fifty bucks. Three. Hundred. Fifty. Dollars.

Btrfs Battles EXT4 With The Linux 2.6.33 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: EXT4 has encountered many significant performance losses over time as its developers batten up the data security, but there have been some improvements too. At the same time though the developers working on the still-experimental Btrfs file-system continue to move along and push forward.

Oracle wins unconditional EU approval for Sun buy

Filed under
Software
OOo
  • Oracle wins unconditional EU approval for Sun buy
  • Mergers: Commission clears Oracle's proposed acquisition of Sun Microsystems (PR)
  • Oracle power couple take Manhattan by billboard

Illuminating the elephant in the open source room

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
  • Illuminating the elephant in the open source room
  • LCA 2010: Kiwis to give FOSS desktop a go
  • LCA 2010: Allison warns of patent traps in Mono
  • Linux.conf.au, FOSS and the Joe Blow job
  • linux.conf.au 2010: Day 4
  • LCA 2010 Thursday
  • Linux.conf.au: Birds of a Feather

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • What Functions Get Used The Most On Linux?
  • Is software freedom a necessity or a distraction when it comes to consumer devices?
  • Ex-JBoss chief attacks Monty's 'dangerous' MySQL crusade
  • Another look at Drupal
  • Size Can Matter: Ramdisk Journal Metadata Performance - Part 2
  • Music jukebox with advanced features for DJs
  • Running Ubuntu on an Active Directory network
  • imgopt – PNG And JPEG Image Optimization
  • Geany's Almost Magical Text-Editing Capabilities
  • QuantZ for Linux
  • Microsoft to Mobile Customers: Choice is a Bad Thing (and Linux will Lose)
  • Ubuntu Showcase Videos are Awesome Adverts
  • BeOS clone Haiku gains KDE applications
  • Open Source Expert Joins CompTIA’s Board
  • Gedit Makes a Great Minimal Note Taker
  • The Importance of Legal Innovation
  • German Gentoo Book
  • Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Your Server with boxinfo
  • Company Offers Free Robots for Open Source Developers
  • Interview with Dries Buytaert on Managing open source projects
  • DtO: Leaving Heirloom

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Locking down GNOME in SUSE 11 based distributions
  • Awk Tutorial: Understand Awk Variables with 3 Practical Examples
  • How to Encrypt directories using EncFS
  • configure an ISA sound card in the 2.6.xx-series kernels
  • Gentoo customizations
  • Pastebinit, a command line pastebin client
  • Managing Linux kernel sources using Git
  • MicroMiser - Power Saving Software for Ubuntu
  • Measuring the Performance of HTTP Web Servers using ApacheBench (ab)
  • Scan your Linux machine for viruses with ClamTk
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More in Tux Machines

Software: VirtualBox, TeX Live Cockpit, Mailspring, Qt, Projects, and Maintainers

  • VirtualBox 5.2.2 Brings Linux 4.14 Fixes, HiDPI UI Improvements
    The Oracle developers behind VM VirtualBox have released a new maintenance build in the VirtualBox 5.2 series that is a bit more exciting than their usual point releases.
  • TeX Live Cockpit
    I have been working quite some time on a new front end for the TeX Live Manager tlmgr. Early versions have leaked into TeX Live, but the last month or two has seen many changes in tlmgr itself, in particular support for JSON output. These changes were mostly driven by the need (or ease) of the new frontend: TLCockpit.
  • Mailspring – A New Open Source Cross-Platform Email Client
    Mailspring is a fork of the now discontinued Nylas Mail client. It does, however, offer a much better performance, and is built with a native C++ sync engine instead of JavaScript. According to the development team, the company is sunsetting further development of Mailspring. Mailspring offers virtually all the best features housed in Nylas Mail, and thanks to its native C++ sync engine it uses fewer dependencies which results in less lag and a reduction in RAM usage by 50% compared to Nylas Mail.
  • Removing Qt 4 from Debian testing (aka Buster): some statistics
    We started filing bugs around September 9. That means roughly 11 weeks, which gives us around 8 packages fixed a week, aka 1.14 packages per day. Not bad at all!
  • Products Over Projects
    However, projects are not the only way of funding and organizing software development. For instance, many companies that sell software as a product or a service do not fund or organize their core product/platform development in the form of projects. Instead, they run product development and support using near-permanent teams for as long as the product is sold in the market. The budget may vary year on year but it is generally sufficient to fund a durable, core development organization continuously for the life of the product. Teams are funded to work on a particular business problem or offering over a period of time; with the nature work being defined by a business problem to address rather than a set of functions to deliver. We call this way of working as “product-mode” and assert that it is not necessary to be building a software product in order to fund and organize software development like this.
  • Why we never thank open source maintainers

    It is true that some of you guys can build a tool in a hackathon, but maintaining a project is a lot more difficult than building a project. Most of the time they are not writing code, but [...]

today's howtos

Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.