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Monday, 21 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story RoboPhone: Sharp to Sell Real Android Phones in Japan Rianne Schestowitz 06/10/2015 - 11:21am
Story [OpenIndiana] Hipster 2015.10 is here Roy Schestowitz 06/10/2015 - 10:27am
Story Black Lab Core Server 7 Released Roy Schestowitz 06/10/2015 - 10:07am
Story Down to Business with Major Deployments Roy Schestowitz 06/10/2015 - 9:59am
Story Majority of Linux users still use Windows or MacOS Roy Schestowitz 06/10/2015 - 9:52am
Story Audacious 3.7 Finally Enters Beta, Ports the Winamp Classic Interface Plugin to Qt Rianne Schestowitz 06/10/2015 - 5:23am
Story Android Marshmallow: What, when, and where? Rianne Schestowitz 06/10/2015 - 5:20am
Story Wine Is Coming to Android for Intel Processors Rianne Schestowitz 06/10/2015 - 3:18am
Story Fedora 24 Linux Operating System to Use NetworkManager 1.2 by Default Rianne Schestowitz 06/10/2015 - 1:51am
Story Manjaro JWM Edition 41015 released Rianne Schestowitz 06/10/2015 - 12:41am

Linux Out Performs Windows in OpenGL

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Late last year I did a posting detailing how Windows 7 crushed Ubuntu 9.10 in the area of 3D performance. Nine months later I am happy to say:

KDocker: Dock Any Application in the System Tray

Filed under
Software

tuxarena.blogspot: I bet at one point or another you felt you missed the system tray integration feature in some application, be it xterm, an audio player, a file manager or any other program. Well, KDocker is just the thing.

Are Kopete's Days Numbered?

Filed under
KDE
Software

thebluemint.net: Most KDE users use Kopete for their IM needs. There's a reason why it's the default IM client in Linux Mint KDE as well as nearly every other KDE-based distro out there.

Most Drivers Won't Be Merged Into X Server 1.10

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: The last talk of the 2010 X.Org Developers' Summit was regarding X.Org Server 1.10. The good news is that nearly every X.Org graphics driver will not be merged back into the xorg-server repository.

Red Hat looks out of state for expansion

Filed under
Linux

newsobserver.com: Red Hat's heady growth has led it to explore out-of-state options for a whopping 300,000 square feet of office space.

50 Reasons to Love GNU/Linux for Schools

Filed under
Linux

pogson.6k.ca: We have all read articles with 5 or 10 reasons to love/hate some facet of IT. I thought I would go for 50.

Mono Mythbusting, September 2010 Edition

Filed under
Software

apebox.org: In an attempt to stem this flow of disinformation, here are some commonly held – but incorrect – beliefs about the Mono framework, and an explanation of the reality of the situation, as far as I understand it.

Mandriva is now forked as Mageia

Filed under
MDV
  • Mandriva is now forked as Mageia
  • Mageia: MandrivaLinux fork
  • Mageia – A New Linux Distribution
  • http://mageia.org

Best Linux Distro for 3D Performance

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: There is one question all new Linux users ask themselves at one point or another: Which Linux distro do I want to use?

GNOME Shell Looks Promising

Filed under
Software

tuxarena.blogspot: GNOME Shell is a window manager designed specifically for the upcoming GNOME 3 desktop, with the intention of offering a rather different way of interacting with the desktop, providing a workspace which hardly resembles the classic desktops.

Ri-Li – A Free Arcade Game For Kids

Filed under
Gaming

linuxandfriends.com: Ri-Li is an arcade game meant for children aged 3 years and up. In this game, the you control a wooden toy train and you have to collect all the coaches spread across the tracks to complete each level.

A Canonical Controversy

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux-blog.org: Remember these past few months where Ubuntu/Canonical’s contribution to Gnome (or lack thereof) was called into question and the topic was on the tip of every Linux news website tongue? Let’s throw some gasoline on that fire!

Mandriva Forked Welcome to Mageia

Filed under
MDV

As you may have heard, the future of the Mandriva Linux distribution is unclear. We believe a fork is the best solution and we have decided to create a new distribution: Mageia.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux and Too Many Choices
  • IBM, Oracle could bid to buy Red Hat
  • Peazip- A powerful opensource file and archive manager
  • The Smell of Microsoft Desperation
  • Why Red Hat should fear Amazon Linux
  • Microsoft tea party against open source
  • The ZFS Linux Module Goes Into Closed Beta
  • KVM: Your Key to Open Source Server Virtualization
  • Interviews from GUADEC, Part 5: Michael Meeks
  • Diaspora: A first peek at Facebook's challenger
  • Sabayon Linux 5.4RC1 Testing Release
  • USB runtime power management Returns to Fedora
  • DtO: Know your Hipsters!
  • Open source: a savvy bet, even in tough times
  • Gentoo: 10 years compiling codeswarm
  • Simple udisks based automount daemon for Ubuntu

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install Nvidia Driver on CentOS
  • create Debian packages with alternative compression
  • Instant message on your LAN with iptux
  • Encrypt / Decrypt a single file
  • How to find – Size of a directory & Free disk space
  • Risize primary partition & add second with Ubuntu
  • Make Ubuntu asks password when mounting ntfs drives
  • Create a file of a specific size with random content

7 days with Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Uniteee: 7 days with Ubuntu Unity on a 7” screen
  • Ubuntu Software Center on Cranky Geeks
  • Previewing Moovida 2.0 on Ubuntu

How do you find and choose free software?

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: So you’ve got your GNU/Linux based box. You’ve installed the base system and you’re good to go. Welcome to the world of freedom. But then what? How do you determine what packages to install. How do you decide which of the alternatives to go with?

Why Broadcom's Release More Significant than Code

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: The release of the code by Broadcom should eventually mean a much better Wi-Fi experience for owners of systems with Broadcom chip sets. But for those that like to read between the lines there may also be a deeper significance to this move.

VMWare wants Novell for Mono, not Linux

Filed under
SUSE

sdtimes.com/blogs: I think I know exactly why VMware wants SuSE, and it's got very little to do with actual Linux. It's not about the Linux so much as it is about the Mono.

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10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups. If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance. In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs. Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more