Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 04 Aug 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Introducing Mustang Linux & Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Mustang Linux is a brand new entry in the small Linux distribution field. It aims to provide a simple (single mini) CD based Linux end-user client. The system boots from CD and loads the base operating system into a RAM image. No hard drive required.

Talking Linux in Sydney

Filed under
Linux

There are three major Linux conferences held annually, one each in the US, Canada and Australia. That alone should provide an indication of the extent to which Australians have been, and are, involved in the free and open source software community. From Monday, Sydney's University of New South Wales will play host to the eighth Australian Linux Conference better known as linux.conf.au.

EU Commission Study Finds You'll Save Money Switching to FOSS

Filed under
OSS

The EU Commission's Final Report on its "Study on the Economic impact of open source software on innovation and the competitiveness of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) sector in the EU" is now available on its policy documents, publications and studies page as a PDF. I thought you'd be interested in the conclusion regarding total cost of ownership.

My First Night With PC-BSD 1.3.01

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

Since I had the CDs for 1.3, I didn't bother to retrieve 1.3.01, as I knew I could update the system afterwards (it's a small update). Full of confidence, I started it "the Next, Next..." way. I let it take over the whole HDD, automatic partitioning, etc.

Mint for Personal Use Laptop

Filed under
Linux

After all the dust settled on the OpenSUSE 10.2 install on the IBM T41, I had a new office use Linux desktop / laptop. What about my home use Linux? A new Linux laptop enters the house when the last MS Windows system leaves.

Fedora releases a live CD

Filed under
Linux

The Fedora community got its first official live CD last month. Based on Fedora Core 6, it shows off the best of what Fedora has to offer. Furthermore, the tools used to put together the CD make creating and maintaining custom Red Hat or Fedora-based live CDs simple.

Ubuntu Tute Part 3 - Nice Package!

Filed under
HowTos

For those who have been following our series thus far, you know that I am on a mission from the Penguin himself to take away as much grief as possible with as little headache as possible. Granted, the command line/shell may need to be bopped open once in a while, but for the most part it’s been easy going.

Linux confab courts Open Source gals

Filed under
Linux

SCALE 5X, the 2007 Southern California Linux Expo to be held at the Westin Los Angeles Airport Feb. 10 and 11, announced this week that it plans to host a "Women in Open Source" mini-conference on Feb. 9 at the same location.

ubuntu- linux is getting better and better

Filed under
Ubuntu

My first experience with Linux was with Redhat 7.3 back in the day. I liked the security and ability to customize but I was turned off by the difficulty installing packages (dependency hell). I recently installed Ubuntu 6.06 Dapper Drake on my new Windows laptop. My first impression is that Linux has changed dramatically.

Today's Howtos & Such:

Filed under
HowTos
  1. Hibernate feature in Linux

  2. How-to get your removable device mounted under an explicit and persistent name
  3. Adding Google Search Function To Deskbar Applet
  4. Compile Atheros Driver in OpenSUSE 10.x
  5. Installing Debian Linux / Ubuntu Linux on the PlayStation 3
  6. Disk ARchive (Backup and Restore) using dar and kdar(dar Frontend)
  7. Installing Wine on Ubuntu Edgy (6.10) 64-bit
  8. How to install Hula Groupware on Arch Linux
  9. Bonager - The Boot Scan Manager for your ubuntu desktop
  10. Managing Laptop Network Connections with KWLAN
  11. Make Wget cater to your needs
  12. Parallels Workstation in Ubuntu
  13. Working with Archives in Linux
  14. A guide to running OpenVZ

  15. How to install VMWare Server 1.0.1 on Mandriva 2007

Finding GNU/Linux replacements for Windows software

Filed under
Software

When discussing ways to switch to GNU/Linux, one of the biggest difficulties I've found is finding answers to the question, "What can I replace this program with?" It's completely understandable; people don't want to lose functionality. However, Googling for answers can easily lead to confusion and frustration if you don't have the background or knowledge to be able to differentiate between the wheat and the chaff. Is there a comprehensive resource for finding GNU/Linux replacements for Windows software?

John Carmack on the State of the Game

Filed under
Interviews
Gaming

Game Informer met with id Software’s John Carmack and Todd Hollenshead to talk about, well, a lot of things. In our hour-long talk, we talked about the state of PC gaming, QuakeCon and the pros and cons of developing for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. Enjoy.

Taking Note of BasKet

Filed under
Software

I started using BasKet version 0.5 a while back with the intention of reviewing it. I found it useful, but didn't really get excited about it. That all changed once I installed version 0.6. The entire interface has been reworked, making it more useable while adding valuable features. If you're not familiar with it, BasKet is multi-purpose note-taking software with a flexible interface and great organization.

How to run Linux inside Linux with User Mode Linux

Filed under
HowTos

User Mode Linux (UML) allows you to run Linux kernels as user mode processes under a host Linux kernel, giving you a simple way to run several independent virtual machines on a single piece of physical hardware. Let's take a look at UML and how it can give you more bang for the hardware buck, or make it easier to debug the kernel.

Manufacturing management company moves to Linux

Filed under
Linux

Hines Corp. is a management company that oversees a conglomerate of manufacturers in the Midwest and Texas, and a distributorship in New York. It has a diverse IT infrastructure that requires attention around the clock. When Hines CIO Ed Harper decided it was time to consolidate and streamline aging legacy systems, he turned from Microsoft to Linux.

Switching from KDE to WinXP

Filed under
OS

For the last several months I have been using Microsoft Windows XP (WinXP) at work after years of using Linux almost exclusively at home and work. In late December 2005 the computers in my section were replaced with new ones that run WinXP and unfortunately this time installing Linux was not an option. Switching from KDE to WindowsXP at work has seriously impaired my productivity.

Apache is the big chief in the world of web servers

Filed under
Software

The Apache HTTP web server is free to download and is also bundled with many commercial products such as IBM's Websphere and the Oracle database. Hundreds of modules have been developed for it, many million websites depend upon it, and so many applications have been designed around it that it is the obvious choice for anyone considering extending their skills in this direction.

Is A Closed iPhone Doomed To Fail?

Filed under
Mac

The blogosphere devoured news of the iPhone and now comes the inevitable indigestion. Among the various gripes about price, carrier exclusivity, a non-removable battery, lack of 3G support, and the inability to download or sync wirelessly, to name a few, it is the iPhone's closed system that may be the device's most controversial feature or flaw, depending on your perspective.

Why Switch to Linux?

Filed under
Linux

I first became interested in Linux in about the year 2000. I was reading everything I could get my hands on by Neal Stephenson and ran into his article In the Beginning was the Command Line. It took a new computer with Windows Millenium Edition installed on it to finally get me to install Linux.

Linux 2.6.19.2 does away with critical data error and security holes

Filed under
Linux

The stable-kernel team has released the Linux kernel 2.6.19.2, which does away with a critical error that occurred when data was being written on hard disks and plugs a number of security holes.

Syndicate content