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Saturday, 17 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Fedora’s lucky 13

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Linux The number 13 is usually associated with bad luck. Friday the 13th (both the date and the movie). Many buildings don’t have a thirteenth floor. Fedora just released it’s number 13 and one might wonder if the number was good or bad for the release.

Quit Expecting Ubuntu To Be Perfect

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  • Quit Expecting Ubuntu To Be Perfect
  • Full Circle Podcast #8: More Opinion Than You Can Handle
  • Dell Says Ubuntu Is Safer Than Windows
  • 30 Simple Yet So Incredible Ubuntu Wallpapers for Desktop
  • Announcing the User Experience Advocates Project
  • Aptitude Removed From Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat
  • Maverick Software Center adds Animated Apps Bar

GNOME Journal June 2010

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  • Shotwell Photo Manager
  • Interview with Quim Gil of the GNOME Advisory Board
  • Time's Making Changes - A Letter from the Editor
  • PHP-GTK, Widgets & Gadgets: An Interview With Elizabeth Smith

Flash Player 10.1 Now Available for Windows, Mac, and Linux

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Software Today I'm thrilled to announce that Adobe Flash Player 10.1 is now available for Windows, Mac, and Linux operating systems. You can get it now.

Rekonq: Konqueror Killer?

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Software When the Maverick Meerkat, better known as Ubuntu 10.10, debuts in October, it will bring with it a new default browser for Kubuntu users in the form of rekonq.

Stewart Rules: Novell Wins! CASE CLOSED!

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Legal Here you go, munchkins. Judge Ted Stewart has ruled for Novell and against SCO. Novell's claim for declaratory judgment is granted; SCO's claims for specific performance and breach of the implied covenant of good fair and fair dealings are denied.

Not a Programmer? Linux Needs You!

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jonreagan.wordpress: Inspired by a comment I received yesterday explaining the problems with non-programmers getting involved in helping Linux projects, I have decided to give a little guidance on how to help out if you are not the code monkey type.

Mozilla girds Firefox with 'hang detector'

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Moz/FF The next version of Firefox will include a "hang detector" that automatically terminates plug-ins that quit talking to the outside world.

Also: Firefox 3.6.4 On The Verge Of Its Final Descent

Open Money- A look at Personal Financial Software for Linux

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Software When it comes to personal financial software choices, the Windows folks have historically had plenty of choices… with a few major ones that seemed obvious. However, the fine folks over on the Linux side of the wall have not had the same.

Why Linux Should Not Get a Free Ride

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Linux I love Linux, I love FLOSS. I love the ideas behind them, and what drives the community. Why am I so critical during my reviews then?

KOffice 2.2: Is It Ready Yet?

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Software KOffice 2.2 was recently released and can be “used for real work”. Conveniently, just after 2.2 was released, I found myself needing to put together a presentation for Akademy – so what to use?

HP to buy slim Linux OS from Phoenix

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Linux (IDG): Hewlett-Packard will buy Linux-based quick-boot OS and client virtualization assets from Phoenix Technologies for US$12 million, Phoenix said on Thursday.

Linux could ease schools tech crunch

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Linux Maybe the answer for local schools facing daunting technology challenges lies with the penguins.

Linux-powered iPad-like tablets can't come quickly enough

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blogs.computerworld: Apple has long had a history of being arrogant. But, more often than not, they've been able to back it up by the quality of their products. But now, with Apple locking out Adobe Flash and Google Ads, not to mention their cute trick of setting up an HTML 5 demo site that only works with Apple's own Safari Web browser, I think Apple has overstepped their authority.

A new contributor agreement for Fedora

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Linux A little over a month ago, the Fedora Project announced a plan to replace the existing Fedora Individual Contributor License Agreement (FICLA) with something new, which we've imaginatively titled the Fedora Project Contributor Agreement (FPCA).

Dear FSF, It’s not you it’s me

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OSS I’ve been using FLOSS on my computers pretty much exclusively for about 5 or 6 years now and I don’t see me going back, but I have started to feel some sort of disconnect to one of the leading institutions of FLOSS lately: The Free Software Foundation (FSF).

Ubuntu Lucid Lynx: free OS that Just Works

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Ubuntu Today, I got caught up enough from my tour to update my ThinkPad to the latest version of Ubuntu. Lucid Lynx went in like butter. The update ran unattended, took about 1h including downloading the whole OS, updated all of my apps without a hitch, and is running smoothly.

KDE 3 vs. KDE 4: Which Linux Desktop Is Right for You?

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KDE Many users are still using KDE 3. For whatever the reasons, several distributions continue to cater to the preference, including aLinux, Knoppix and MEPIS, all of which offer GNU/Linux with KDE 3.0 as the desktop. This raises the question: How do the two series of KDE releases compare?

Just in time for the World Cup: Firefox Cup!

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Moz/FF 32 national teams are ready to “take the field now, unify us, make as feel proud…” at the FIFA World Cup South Africa 2010, and Mozilla is joining the celebration with the Firefox Cup.

Parallel Realities: Retro-themed Linux games

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Gaming The Parallel Realities website offers a collection of simple, mostly SDL based action games. They're all fairly lightweight and might make good boredom beaters on a less powerful machine, or failing that, a handy distraction while waiting for something to complete in the background.

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More in Tux Machines

lkml: remove eight obsolete architectures

In the end, it seems that while the eight architectures are extremely different, they all suffered the same fate: There was one company in charge of an SoC line, a CPU microarchitecture and a software ecosystem, which was more costly than licensing newer off-the-shelf CPU cores from a third party (typically ARM, MIPS, or RISC-V). It seems that all the SoC product lines are still around, but have not used the custom CPU architectures for several years at this point. Read more

If you hitch a ride with a scorpion… (Coverity)

I haven’t seen a blog post or notice about this, but according to the Twitters, Coverity has stopped supporting online scanning for open source projects. Is anybody shocked by this? Anybody? [...] Not sure what the story is with Coverity, but it probably has something to do with 1) they haven’t been able to monetize the service the way they hoped, or 2) they’ve been able to monetize the service and don’t fancy spending the money anymore or 3) they’ve pivoted entirely and just aren’t doing the scanning thing. Not sure which, don’t really care — the end result is the same. Open source projects that have come to depend on this now have to scramble to replace the service. [...] I’m not going to go all RMS, but the only way to prevent this is to have open tools and services. And pay for them. Read more

Easily Fund Open Source Projects With These Platforms

Financial support is one of the many ways to help Linux and Open Source community. This is why you see “Donate” option on the websites of most open source projects. While the big corporations have the necessary funding and resources, most open source projects are developed by individuals in their spare time. However, it does require one’s efforts, time and probably includes some overhead costs too. Monetary supports surely help drive the project development. If you would like to support open source projects financially, let me show you some platforms dedicated to open source and/or Linux. Read more

KDE: Kdenlive, Kubuntu, Elisa, KDE Connect

  • Kdenlive Café #27 and #28 – You can’t miss it
    Timeline refactoring, new Pro features, packages for fast and easy install, Windows version and a bunch of other activities are happening in the Kdenlive world NOW!
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 9
    This is the 9th article, the final part of the series. This ninth article gives you more documentations to help yourself in using Kubuntu 17.10. The resources are online links to certain manuals and ebooks specialized for Kubuntu basics, command lines usage, software installation instructions, how to operate LibreOffice and KDE Plasma.
  • KDE's Elisa Music Player Preparing For Its v0.1 Released
    We have been tracking the development of Elisa, one of several KDE music players, since development started about one year ago. Following the recent alpha releases, the KDE Elisa 0.1 stable release is on the way. Elisa developers are preparing the Elisa v0.1 release and they plan to have it out around the middle of April.
  • KDE Connect Keeps Getting Better For Interacting With Your Desktop From Android
    KDE Connect is the exciting project that allows you to leverage your KDE desktop from Android tablets/smartphones for features like sending/receiving SMS messages from your desktop, toggling music, sharing files, and much more. KDE Connect does continue getting even better.
  • First blog & KDE Connect media control improvements
    I've started working on KDE Connect last November. My first big features were released yesterday in KDE Connect 1.8 for Android, so cause for celebration and a blog post! My first big feature is media notifications. KDE Connect has, since it's inception, allowed you to remotely control your music and video's. Now you can also do this with a notification, like all Android music apps do! So next time a bad song comes up, you don't need to switch to the KDE Connect app. Just click next on the notification without closing you current app. And just in case you don't like notifications popping up, there's an option to disable it.