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Wednesday, 29 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GUN Linux: On the range with TrackingPoint’s new AR-15s Rianne Schestowitz 11/08/2014 - 1:52am
Story QML/JS ported to KDevelop 5 Rianne Schestowitz 11/08/2014 - 1:41am
Story DEFT 8.2 ready for download Rianne Schestowitz 11/08/2014 - 12:54am
Story Announcing first Inqlude alpha release Rianne Schestowitz 11/08/2014 - 12:52am
Story Linux Mint Debian Edition to Switch to a Debian Stable Package Base Rianne Schestowitz 10/08/2014 - 8:06pm
Story For The Love Of Open Mapping Data Rianne Schestowitz 10/08/2014 - 8:02pm
Story Dogfooding: Flame on Nightly Roy Schestowitz 10/08/2014 - 7:34pm
Story Firefox Still Does Not Run Properly Under Weston, Wayland’s Reference Compositor Roy Schestowitz 10/08/2014 - 7:20pm
Story Android Circuit: An Early Moto 360 Review, The Chinese Rulers Of Android, And The Galaxy Tab Nook 4 Is Coming Rianne Schestowitz 10/08/2014 - 7:09pm
Story Screenshot Tool Shutter 0.92 Ditches Ubuntu One Support Rianne Schestowitz 10/08/2014 - 7:02pm

Kernel Log - What's new in 2.6.29: Part 8

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: A glance at the changed files and code makes it clear how hard the kernel hackers have been working on 2.6.29, with more new lines of code added over the current development cycle than ever before.

Unreleased ATI Catalyst Driver Appears In Ubuntu

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Last year when Ubuntu 8.10 was released it had shipped with an unpublished ATI Catalyst driver since the proprietary ATI drivers available to the public were not compatible with X Server 1.5. Now with Ubuntu 9.04 we have run into a similar situation.

On Configuring The Linux Kernel For Debugging

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

linux-foundation.org/weblogs: In this blog let’s look at something simple, yet apparently, not used nearly enough. Let’s look at configuring the Linux kernel with various options for debugging.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Battle of OS: Linux vs Windows

  • Configure Your System With Ubuntu Tweak
  • The next update viewer
  • Sysadmins. Do your job!
  • Red Hat Linux joins Cisco for Unified Computing push
  • openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 63
  • KDEtwitter
  • Tuxradar Podcast Season 1 Episode 4
  • The return of Annvix
  • Mozilla Developer News 03/17
  • HP Mini 1000 Netbook Review
  • I hate Windows
  • Apache's Ongoing Licensing Bout with Sun
  • DISA to open source administrative software
  • Ubuntu 8.10 on the AA1 - follow-up review
  • SFLS - Episode 0x09: Karen F. Copenhaver
  • Special Source 6 Released
  • Newspapers Going Online-Only Should Look at FOSS Content Management
  • Linux Vs. ... Google, Sort Of
  • DirectX 10 coming to Linux through WINE and CrossOver
  • Imagine booting up, logging on before your hair turns gray
  • Knoppix 6.0 on Netbooks Redux
  • No recession woes for open source
  • Comux 001100
  • Why Is the Ubuntu-based Dell Mini 9 Unfinished?
  • PCLinuxOS 2009 Screenshots

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Software Tip: Using Unetbootin

  • Change file extension revisited
  • Apt-get Update GPG Key Errors and Fix
  • Linux Printing Tips
  • PLAIN Smtpd Auth with Postfix (faster than light)
  • The fastest way to disable PC speaker
  • Access the X Window Clipboard from Command Line with xclip
  • The Perfect Desktop - PCLinuxOS 2009.1
  • Quick Fix for the ‘Size Mismatch’ When Updating Ubuntu Linux
  • HowTo get a small sample dataset from a mysql database
  • Avoid Gentoo emerge steal all your CPU cycles
  • Setting Up Gmail With Evolution In Ubuntu

Google Chrome on Linux progressing

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: Ubuntu users (or users of a Ubuntu-based distro) who have been waiting patiently for the chance to play with Google Chrome, there's now a dead simple way for you to do it.

Some KDE stuff i would like to have fixed..

Filed under
KDE

blusrcu.ba: Well there are some stuff that i would like to have fixed in near future in KDE 4.x. Let’s start right away.

Vote early, vote often: "We're Linux" voting begins

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: The Linux Foundation “We’re Linux” contest is entering its final stages. This weekend, the submission phase wrapped up and now it’s time for the larger community to do what it does best: Submit the work to as many eyeballs as possible to find the best entries.

Fun Learning Games For Kids 2-10 on Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

codepad.classhelper.org: Teachers are always on the lookout for educational software that can actually hold a child’s attention. Instead of cutting the kids loose on the Xbox, why not give GCompris a try?

Play Games Inside Your Linux Terminal

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: So you spend most of your time on the terminal? Just entered a few commands? Feeling bored? How about some command line games? Yep, there are some oldies but goldies you can delve into for a little recreation on the terminal.

Discouraging Software Patent Lawsuits

Filed under
Linux

press.redhat.com: Recently we’ve seen some surprising comments about Red Hat’s stand on software patents and, in particular, about one of its patent applications related to the AMQP specification. It looks like clarification is called for.

Linux For The Masses: A Universal Package Manager

Filed under
Software

daniweb.com: A little while ago, a friend of mine tapped me on the shoulder--virtually speaking--and asked me why there isn't an easier way to install software on a Linux computer.

Ubuntu is Linux: Really?

Filed under
Ubuntu

dgoodmaniii.wordpress: I happened upon a post over at Penguin Pete’s entitled Ubuntu is Not Linux: Pass it On!, and found myself nodding the entire time. Ubuntu is not Linux.

Stallman: Free software Is Not About Saving Money

Filed under
OSS

eweekeurope.co.uk: Companies turning to open source in the recession should know that free software is about much more, according to the GNU founder.

5 Technologies that will shape the future of Linux

Filed under
Sci/Tech

handlewithlinux.com: I like to contemplate the technology of the future and there are some things I think will be very important in the future of Linux. Following a small list of 5 technologies that will in my opinion shape the future of linux.

Smallest full-featured Linux PC ever?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: CompuLab is readying a full-featured Ubuntu Linux PC that draws six Watts and costs $245-to-$400. Measuring 4 x 4.5 x 1.0 inches, the Fit-PC2 would be dwarfed by a stack of three CD jewel-cases.

GNOME 2.26

Filed under
Software

techpark6.com: GNOME 2.26 is set for release for March 18th and if you’re wondering exactly what the developers have cooked up for their latest bi-annual release, well you’ve come to the right place.

Top 10 Open Source Gaming Projects To Revive

Filed under
Software

freegamer.blogspot: The great thing about open source is a project can never become extinct - there is always a chance of it being brought back to life either by the original authors who re-find their motivation, by new contributors who see the potential, or a mixture of both.

Open Enterprise Interview: Mike Olson, Cloudera

Filed under
Interviews

computerworlduk.com: Yesterday, I wrote about the launch of the open source company Cloudera. Olson explains the background to the company, and to Hadoop, the software it is based on: what it does, and why business might want to use it; he talks about his company's services and business model, and why he thinks cloud computing is neither a threat nor an opportunity for open source.

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today's leftovers

  • DRM display resource leasing (kernel side)
    So, you've got a fine head-mounted display and want to explore the delights of virtual reality. Right now, on Linux, that means getting the window system to cooperate because the window system is the DRM master and holds sole access to all display resources. So, you plug in your device, play with RandR to get it displaying bits from the window system and then carefully configure your VR application to use the whole monitor area and hope that the desktop will actually grant you the boon of page flipping so that you will get reasonable performance and maybe not even experience tearing. Results so far have been mixed, and depend on a lot of pieces working in ways that aren't exactly how they were designed to work.
  • GUADEC accommodation
    At this year’s GUADEC in Manchester we have rooms available for you right at the venue in lovely modern student townhouses. As I write this there are still some available to book along with your registration. In a couple of days we have to a final numbers to the University for how many rooms we want, so it would help us out if all the folk who want a room there could register and book one now if you haven’t already done so! We’ll have some available for later booking but we have to pay up front for them now so we can’t reserve too many.
  • Kickstarter for Niryo One, open source 6-axis 3D printed robotic arm, doubles campaign goal
    A Kickstarter campaign for the Niryo One, an open source 3D printed 6-axis robotic arm, has more than doubled its €20,000 target after just a couple of days. The 3D printed robot is powered by Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and Robot Operating System.
  • Linux Action Show to End Eleven Year Run at LFNW
    Jupiter Broadcasting’s long-running podcast, Linux Action Show, will soon be signing off the air…er, fiber cable, for the last time. The show first streamed on June 10, 2006 and was hosted by “Linux Tycoon” Bryan Lunduke and Jupiter Broadcasting founder Chris Fisher. Lunduke left the show in 2012, replaced by Matt Hartley, who served as co-host for about three years. The show is currently hosted by Fisher and Noah Chelliah, president of Altispeed, an open source technology company located in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

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