Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Rifles powered by Linux purchased by US Army Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 8:55am
Story PC-BSD 10.0-RC5 Now Available Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:59am
Story [GIT PULL 0/6] ARM: SoC changes for Linux 3.14 Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:53am
Story How to get your conference talk submission accepted Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:48am
Story Crypto Update for Linux 3.14 Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:42am
Story Open Source Libferris: Chasing the "Everything is a File System" Dream Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:31am
Story New Linux Job Board is now OUT Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:25am
Story Kubuntu 14.04 Alpha 2 Released with Improved USB Creator Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:20am
Story SkySQL goes after Oracle MySQL with enterprise release Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:13am
Story Ubuntu Touch and Tizen phones a no-show for 2014 Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2014 - 11:19pm

Debian Project News - August 18th, 2008

Filed under

Welcome to this year's 9th issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Some of the topics covered in this issue include:

  • Debian turns 15

  • 8th annual Debian Conference finished
  • Freespire 5 to be based on Debian
  • ... and much more.

Is the “killer app” argument dead?

Filed under
OS The other day I was talking with a bunch of other tech heads about the ongoing Windows vs. Mac vs. Linux market share war and why. “It all revolves around killer apps,” pipes up one of the tech heads. “The problem with both Apple and Linux is that neither OS has a compelling killer app driving the user base.”

A tour of Empathy IM client

Filed under
Software Listed on the roadmap to Gnome 2.24 is the integration with Empathy, a multi-protocol IM client. For this article I tested Empathy to see how it works and if it is better or worse then Pidgin (currently my favorite IM client).

Linux and Web 2.0: the Killer Combo

Filed under
Web I have noticed that Linux is a hot topic on Digg right now. The OS - and, let's face it, Linux is easier to define when we just view it as an OS - has been gaining momentum ever since Windows Vista turned into a nightmare for Microsoft.

Also: Why 'Cloud Computing' Is for the Birds
And: Desktop Linux as a Service: Will it Work?

BackTrack4 chooses Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu It is a Linux distribution distributed as a Live CD which resulted from the merger of WHAX and the Auditor Security Collection. I talked with Mati Aharoni about new release now in developement, and he said to me that has made the decision to abandon slackware for Ubuntu in next BackTrack version (4).

Leaked: Dell Inspiron 910 (Mini Note) Specs and Release Date

Filed under
Hardware A few weeks ago we ran some rumored specs of Dell's answer to the Eee, the Dell Inspiron 910 (aka Mini Inspiron and Inspiron Mini). Now we've gotten our hands on the full (internal) 910 web documentation.

And: Linux netbook uses Chinese chip

Music Education With Linux Sound Tools, Redux

Filed under
Software Four years ago I wrote an article for the Linux Journal about my use of Linux software for music instruction. A lot has changed since then, so I thought I should update that article to reflect my current use of Linux in my work as a music teacher. I'll follow the presentation of materials as I organized it in the original article, but first I'll share some observations about the changing nature of my trade.

building the complete browser for everyone everywhere

Filed under
Moz/FF Since Stuart landed the Qt port into mozilla-central the other day and Ryan Paul wrote an article on Qt and Mozilla I thought it might be worth it to add some context to that work.

Acer Aspire One A110

Filed under
Hardware Thankfully, Acer has taken a slightly more restrained view of what constitutes an SCC. Its Aspire One is available in just three basic flavours. On the desk in front of us, we have the least expensive, most basic model, the 8GB and Linux in MacBook-envy white, the most pure iteration of the SCC concept to date, in our opinion.

Ubuntu goes enterprise

Filed under

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Ubuntu is well known in user circles as the cool kids' Linux. It's available pre-installed on PCs and laptops from Dell and from numerous smaller computer vendors. What Ubuntu hasn't been known as is a Linux distribution that matters to CIOs and IT managers. Things are changing.

Mark Surman: New Mozilla Foundation Executive Director

Filed under

blog.lizardwrangler: I’m thrilled to announce that Mark Surman is joining the Mozilla Foundation as our new Executive Director. Mark joins us after a long period of getting to know — and being known by — Mozilla contributors.

9 Linux Myth Debunked

Filed under
Linux When it comes to Linux there are 3 kinds of people, those who never heard of it, those who are afraid of it, and those who hate it and spread falsities about it. I don’t really care about the first, they probably aren’t really technologically literate anyways, as long as they have E-mail they are content. While the second group is the result of the actions of the third. Let’s hit two birds with one stone shall we?

Also: Linux Myth #2 - Linux is more difficult to install

some howtos:

Filed under
  • Tips and Tricks Part II

  • Short Tip: Ignore files in svn
  • zypper feature: source and automatic build dependencies install
  • How to install advanced desktop effects in ubuntu
  • Keeping your Home Directory Organized
  • Cook your RAW photos into JPEG with Linux
  • Enabling Multiple CPUs (SMP) in Ubuntu
  • Free your IPODS (on Linux)
  • Bash Files

Ubuntu at Toyota

Filed under
Ubuntu I’m waiting a few hours at the Thompson Toyota, my Prius is getting some minor work done to it to pass state inspection, it still takes a few hours. I wiggle the mouse, and up pops the Ubuntu Heron! Wow!

My first taste of XFCE…

Filed under

meandubuntu.wordpress: Well, I gave KDE a whirl, but it’s not ready for me yet, so I thought I might try out XFCE. The first thing I wanted to do was get mono and mono apps off my system, just to see where that would put me. I lost three apps.

Adventures with Mandriva 2009.0 Beta 1

Filed under
MDV Using Mandriva has always been a love-hate relationship for me. Mandriva's distros were attractive, but quite buggy. In old times, whatever you could get for free was already outdated: I still remember the frustration. In recent times, it was mostly about the random bugs.

NimbleX 2008 is speedy but flawed

Filed under
Linux NimbleX, a Slackware-based distribution, advertises itself as "the new wave of Linux." However, what is appealing in NimbleX -- its speed and small footprint and the resulting selection of alternative software choices -- will likely strike veteran GNU/Linux users as being very old school.

Fedora to Offer College Scholarships

Filed under
Linux Forget special sale prices on calculators and dorm room furniture, Fedora has the ultimate back-to-school offer -- a schloarship program for college-bound students who contribute to free software and the Fedora Project.

And: * Where Red Hat (And Its Partners) Profit Most
* Fedora infrastructure breach?
* Changing Window Manager on Fedora

4 Linux Distros Which Look Like Mac OS X

Filed under
Linux What a week! I’ve been working on my podcast so I’m a bit behind on posting. Here’s an interesting compilation of Linux distribution which resemble Apple’s Mac OS 10. They might not be identical, but you guys who like Apple’s design might appreciate the fact yu can get something like it, with the nice-on-the-inside GNU/Linux kernel, out-of-the-box. For free.

Forbes rewrites the history of open source

Filed under
OSS In the name of defining jargon, Forbes this week tries a complete rewrite of open source history. This is accomplished by someone named Dan Woods, who calls his company Evolved Media.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Rackspace and FOSS Report

  • The Rackspace State of Open Source
    As the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona kicks off, Rackspace has released a report entitled ‘The State of Open Source’. With every conference seemingly extolling the virtues of open source software, this report is timely. It manages to differentiate between enterprise open source and the wider open source software market.
  • Why digital transformation needs open source
    As if there wasn't already ample reason for businesses to switch to open source, Forrester analysts Paul Miller and Lauren E Nelson released a report in April 2016, entitled Open Source Powers Enterprise Digital Transformation — CIOs Need To Embrace Open Source Software To Drive Change, which further drives the point.
  • Despite Security Fears, Open Source Is Fuelling Innovation and Cost Savings in UK Businesses
  • Security concerns fail to hold back UK open source success
    However, despite its increasingly common use, many (54%) still perceive external security threats to be a big barrier to adoption, that’s according to a report published by Rackspace. The State of Open Source study, which was conducted among IT decision makers in UK businesses with over 1,000 employees and revenues over £500m, and looks at the ways open source is being used, its benefits, but also what is holding back adoption and business concerns. According to the report open source has come of age with 85% using open source technology to migrate a closed source project to open source. Open source also isn’t just a tool for small businesses; the vast majority (90%) of large businesses are now deploying open source-based enterprise applications, with 25% being completely open source. The reason for the growing adoption is because of the money and time savings. Rackspace found that for each project that had been migrated to open source technology, six out of ten organisations saved on average £30,146 and reduced project lifecycle by six months. Greater innovation was reported by many (49%), and 46% were driven to open source because of the competitive opportunities. Additionally, just under half (45%) said that it enabled them to get products and services to market faster. John Engates, Chief Technology Officer at Rackspace, said: “While open source technologies have been around for many years, it is great to see that enterprise businesses are finally dipping their toes in and seeing the tangible benefits.

FOSS and Blockchain

Security Leftovers

  • The internet apocalypse map hides the major vulnerability that created it
    During Friday’s massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on DNS service provider Dyn, one might be forgiven for mistaking the maps of network outages for images of some post-apocalyptic nuclear fallout. Screenshots from sites like showed menacingly red, fuzzy heat maps of, well, effectively just population centers of the United States experiencing serious difficulty accessing Twitter, Github, Etsy, or any of Dyn's other high-profile clients. Aside from offering little detail and making a DDoS literally into a glowing red menace, they also obscured the reality of just how centralized a lot of internet infrastructure really is. DNS is ground zero for the uneasy tension of the internet’s presumed decentralized resilience and the reality that as of now, translating IP addresses into domain names requires some kind of centralized, hierarchical platform, and that’s probably not going to radically change anytime soon. Other maps provided by various business to business network infrastructure companies weren’t much more helpful. These maps seem to exist mostly to signal that the companies in question have lots of cool data and that it can be made into a flashy map — which might impress potential customers, but that doesn’t offer a ton of insights for the layperson. For example, threat intelligence company Norse's map appears to be mostly a homage to the Matthew Broderick movie War Games: a constant barrage of DDoS attacks beaming like space invader rockets across a world map. Akamai has an impressive 3D visualization that renders traffic as points beaming into the atmosphere. And website monitoring service Pingdom offers a dot map at such a far-out zoom level that it's essentially useless for seeking out more meaningful patterns than "outages happen in population centers, also there are a lot of outages."
  • CoreOS Patched Against the "Dirty COW" Linux Kernel Vulnerability, Update Now
  • World’s first hack-proof router launched
    Turris Omnia router, tagged the world’s first hack-proof router, was launched yesterday at the CES Unveiled Show in Prague, Czech Republic. As an essential part of any home internet network, routers are rather poorly secured and protected against cyber attack. More often than not, the only security feature is the default password. With easily required internet knowledge and some skills, these routers can be hacked, providing unauthorized access to a complete internet network. From there on, anything is possible.