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Thursday, 23 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Demystifying Open Source

Filed under
OSS

sys-con.com: In 2008, the open source community saw the year end with a headline-catching lawsuit, the Free Software Foundation files suit against Cisco for General Public License (GPL) violations. Not to be outdone, 2009 also ended with a bang. Best Buy, Samsung, JVC and 11 other consumer electronics companies were named in a copyright infringement lawsuit filed on December 14, 2009, by the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) on behalf of the Software Freedom Conservancy.

Opera 10.50 Alpha

Filed under
Software

lockergnome.com: The people at Opera Labs are being very careful with this release, and taking much time before going so far as to call a delivered product a beta. Another build, 3199, has been released as alpha, dropping the pre- from the moniker.

Linux command line tips

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HowTos

ghacks.net: I thought it would be useful to break away from all the GUI-goodness and offer up a few command line tips and tricks. Why? No matter how powerful, user-friendly, and modern the Linux desktop becomes, there may come a time when you want to step up your game and get down and dirty with the command line interface.

Lubuntu 10.04 Alpha 1 - Visual Overview

Filed under
Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: April 29th will see the release of new addition to the Ubuntu family. Joining Ubuntu, Kubuntu and Xubuntu will be a new lightweight version - Lubuntu.

Stable kernel tree status, January 18

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Linux

kroah.com: Here's the state of the -stable kernel trees, as of January 18, 2010.

Puppy Arcade 5 & Q&A with Scott Jarvis

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
Gaming

openbytes.wordpress: How things have changed today and the demand for retro gaming is reflected in the amount of emulation projects there are in progress. Puppy Arcade aims to provide all your retro computing desires. It’s based on tiny TurboPup Xtreme, which itself it a highly optimized version of Puppy Linux.

Ubuntu Desktop Alpha 2 and Alpha 3 Work Item Update

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Ubuntu

theravingrick.blogspot: As you are probably aware, in Lucid the platform team is working and re-planning in three separate milestones. Last week we passed the first such milestone, Alpha 2. The desktop team then re-planned for the next milestone, Alpha 3.

Vim Plugins You Should Know About, Part VI: nerd_tree.vim

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Software

catonmat.net: This is the sixth post in the article series “Vim Plugins You Should Know About“. This time I am going to introduce you to a vim plugin called “nerd_tree.vim“. It’s so useful that I can’t imagine working without it in vim.

Drupal's Dries Buytaert on Building the Next Drupal

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Interviews
Drupal

itworld.com: Among the many open source projects on the upswing is Drupal, a content management system written in PHP; Drupal has attracted a lot of attention from developers and mindshare among end users. This week, when Drupal 7 was about to go into Alpha test, I spoke with Dries.

ReactOS May Begin Heavily Using Wine Code

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OS

phoronix.com: While we don't normally talk much about ReactOS, the free software operating system that was started some twelve years ago to provide binary compatible with Windows NT, there is a new proposal to abandon much of its Win32 subsystem that has built up over the past decade and to create a new Windows subsystem that in large part is derived from Wine code.

The Limits of Linux's 'Live Free or Die'

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Linux

earthweb.com: Linux’s main merit, as a kernel and an ecosystem, is its open source nature. That means the software that runs on it has little choice but to be open source. This doesn’t mean closed-source software is unavailable on Linux—just that it’s got the deck stacked strongly against it.

A Preview of KDE 4.4

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KDE

maketecheasier.com: A highly anticipated release, KDE 4.4 has taken necessary steps to solidify the underlying Plasma technology of KDE 4 and add polish to the already shiny surface. This week, MakeTechEasier will take you on a preview of the upcoming KDE 4.4.

Health Check: Moonlight

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Software

h-online.com: Moonlight was written in three weeks in June of 2007 by a group of Mono developers working round the clock to fulfil a promise made by Miguel de Icaza. Their aim: to demonstrate Silverlight running on Linux at Microsoft's ReMIX conference show in Paris in the summer of that year.

Crowdsourcing the KDE Web Site

Filed under
KDE
Web

ostatic.com/blog: The KDE Project is taking a smart approach to reworking the KDE Website. Lydia Pintscher put out the call Sunday for contributors to pitch in with content and screenshots for one or more KDE programs by January 23rd.

Slackware Linux - Less is more

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Slack

itpro.co.uk: Slackware is the oldest Linux distribution still with us and has a loyal following among those long term Linux users who pine for the old fashioned virtues of simplicity, straightforwardness and lack of bloat.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 337

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Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: A first look at Jibbed 5.0.1 (a NetBSD live CD)
  • News: Fedora Community Remix, Mandriva "Cooker" updates, Dreamlinux future, Arch Linux interview
  • Questions and answers: In search of "better" applications
  • Statistics: Online CD, DVD and USB media sales
  • Released last week: BackTrack 4, Pardus Linux 2009.1
  • New distributions: Android-x86, Puredyne, Zen-mini
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Day one at Camp KDE 2010

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KDE

kdenews.org: The first day of Camp KDE is behind us, with the first of the many presentations being well attended. Saturday, the first day of Camp KDE 2010 in San Diego, started with a short introduction by Jeff Mitchell.

Benchmarking Debian's GNU/kFreeBSD

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Linux

phoronix.com: There has been an effort underway within the Debian development community to pull the FreeBSD kernel within this distribution to provide an alternative to using the Linux kernel. With the Debian Squeeze release being just two months away we have decided to provide the first public set of benchmarks that compare the Debian GNU/kFreeBSD performance to that of Debian GNU/Linux.

Linux.conf.au - Day One

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux.conf.au - Day One
  • LCA 2010: Wanna kill a FOSS community?
  • Novell pulses nicely with Google Wave

today's howtos & leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Linux Disk Space Lost? Use Tune2fs , or use xfs
  • Home print server using CUPS (using X11 or console based only)
  • Graphical Monitor for the Power Consumption of a Laptop in Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala
  • How to set up the Canon Pixma MX860 with Fedora
  • Eclipse on Stellarium
  • Remote searching with Beagle
  • XMonad on Ubuntu
  • Blacklisting e-mail addresses using MailScanner
  • Why embedded OS's are like mammals
  • Install Guest additions and run fullscreen mode on VirtualBox Guest OS | Linux
  • How To Customize The Boot Splash Screen & Logo
  • Convert audio files recursively
  • Urgent: Help Shawn Powers & Family
  • DtO: Linux Tech Support - Day 6
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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Greenfield, Polaris, Ryzen

  • Greenfield: An In-Browser HTML5 Wayland Compositor
    Earlier this year we covered the Westfield project as Wayland for HTML5/JavaScript by providing a Wayland protocol parser and generator for JavaScript. Now that code has morphed into Greenfield to provide a working, in-browser HTML5 Wayland compositor.
  • New Polaris Firmware Blobs Hit Linux-Firmware.Git
    Updated firmware files for the command processor (CP) on AMD Polaris graphics cards have landed in linux-firmware.git. These updated firmware files for Polaris GPUs are light on details besides being for the CP and from their internal 577de7b1 Git state.
  • Report: Ryzen "Raven Ridge" APU Not Using HBM2 Memory
    Instead of the Vega graphics on Raven Ridge using HBM2 memory, it appears at least for some models they are just using onboard DDR4 memory. FUDZilla is reporting today that there is just 256MB of onboard DDR4 memory being used by the new APU, at least for the Ryzen 5 APU found on the HP Envy x360 that was the first Raven APU system to market.

Command Line: FFmpeg, Coinmon, Tizonia

  • FFmpeg Lands OpenCL Improvements
    Besides a lot of NVDEC code landing for the next FFmpeg release, there's also been a number of OpenCL improvements that were just committed to this multimedia library's codebase. The work landed yesterday includes removing an older and experimental OpenCL API while introducing a new OpenCL "hwcontext" implementation. This in turn has introduced an OpenCL overlay filter and OpenCL unsharp mask filter.
  • Coinmon – Check Cryptocurrency Prices From Commandline
    A while ago, we published a guide about Cli-Fyi – a potentially useful command line query tool. Using Cli-Fyi, we can easily find out the latest price of a cryptocurrency and lots of other useful details. Today, we are going to see yet another cryptcurrency price checker tool called “Coinmon”. Unlike Cli.Fyi, Coinmon is only for checking the price of various cryptocurrencies. Nothing more! Coinmon will check cryptocurrencies’ prices, changes right from your Terminal. It will fetch all details from from coinmarketcap.com APIs. It is quite useful for those who are both Crypto investors and Engineers.
  • Command Line Music Player for Spotify, YouTube & Other Music Streaming Services
    Tizonia is a command-line music player that let you stream music from Spotify, Google Play Music, YouTube, Soundcloud, and more, straight from the terminal.

OSS: Configuration Management, Man(ual), Patent Traps (5G and the Internet of Things), Sponsored Development

  • 9 Excellent Open Source Configuration Management Applications
    End users at public and private sector organizations sometimes perceive IT teams a barrier to the development of the business. When the business demands new services and applications, it may take months before progress is made. Why is that? It’s too common for IT teams to spend too much time fighting fires; after all they can come from so many different sources. An IT team’s main responsibility is to maintain, secure, and operate an organization’s systems and networks. This, in itself, carries a huge responsibility. IT teams that maintain technology infrastructure, deploy applications, and provisioning environments with many manual tasks are inefficient. In modern environments, services are rarely deployed in isolation. Simple applications may need several services to run – such as a web server and a database. Deploying more complex systems, many services may need installing, configuring, and linked together. Streamlining system administration must therefore be part of an IT solution. And one of the most time-consuming activity for IT teams is the management of the business’s infrastructure. Automation minimizes manual work, reducing the risk of human mistakes, and offering the ability to quickly deploy new services and applications without risking reliability. Whether it involves container orchestration, real-time big data, deep learning, or stream processing, large software demands operations to be automated. Here’s where configuration management system software steps in. This software automates the configuration of machines to a particular state. Like any other tools, they are designed to solve specific problems in certain ways. The goal is to get a system from whatever state it is in, into the desired state. Configuration management software are the tools of choice for many system administrators and devops professionals. Cloud platforms enable teams to deploy and maintain applications serving thousands of users, and the leading open source configuration management tools offer ways to automate the various processes.
  • 'Gimme Gimme Gimme' Easter egg in man breaks automated tests at 00:30
    The maintainer of the Linux manual program man has scrapped an "Easter egg" after it broke a user's automatic code tests. On Tuesday, Unix systems administrator Jeff Schaller wrote in a Stack Exchange post: "We've noticed that some of our automatic tests fail when they run at 00:30 but work fine the rest of the day. They fail with the message 'gimme gimme gimme' in stderr, which wasn't expected."
  • Open source and standards – The path towards 5G and the Internet of Things
    Following the success of last year’s event, the 2nd workshop “Open Source and Standards – The Path Towards 5G and the Internet of Things”, jointly organised by NGMN and the ITU, took place on 1st November 2017 in Bellevue (Seattle), Washington, USA. The workshop was hosted by Microsoft and co-organised by the IPR Plenary of the NGMN Alliance and the International Telecommunication Union. Bringing together key representatives of a wide range of industry, including standards bodies, open source communities and academia, the discussions focused on how best standard-setting organisations and open source communities can capitalise upon each other’s deliverables and expertise for building a consistent and coherent 5G eco-system. With more than 100 participants, the workshop discussed how diverse stakeholders can rely on the respective strengths and development models to place a broad range of industries in a strong position to achieve the common vision for 5G and beyond.
  • Sponsored development is a win-win for users and developers
    There is a myth that simply by making a software platform open source, qualified people will give up their nights and weekends to contribute to its development. With rare exceptions, that's not how the open source world works. Building a community of contributors takes time, and complex applications often have a steep learning curve before a developer becomes comfortable working with the code. Open source software companies are the fuel behind a lot of software development, forming the communities and providing the financial backing that support it. And, like any other type of business, open source software companies need to earn money to stay in business.

Games: GameShell, GOG, Oxygen Not Included and More