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About Tux Machines

Friday, 22 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Barcode Writer in Pure PostScript
  • Google CL for Linux explained
  • Wireshark II: The Analysis
  • How to upgrade (convert) ext3 to ext4 file system
  • Build a Linux Web Server With An Old Computer [Part 2]
  • Introduction to awk
  • Last.fm Mix radio with the linux client
  • Creating a Betfair Bot Part 2
  • KDE 4.5.3 available for Mandriva 2010
  • Panflute: Control Your Favourite Music Player From Gnome Panel
  • Secure Your PC and Website From Firesheep Session Hijacking
  • Finding all mysql user privileges
  • Gting to know Alice
  • Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat in VirtualBox
  • speed up the booting process for Grub2 boot loader using profiling
  • More Layers
  • How To: Change run levels in Linux
  • Install Ubuntu Maverick On Your Mac Virtualbox
  • Install MyPaint

Alternative Linux distros that deserve the limelight

Filed under
Linux

apcmag.com: Ubuntu might be the most popular Linux, but there are two other desktop distributions which have a lot to offer but aren't getting the publicity they deserve, says Ashton Mills.

Shuttleworth: critics would do well to get a clue

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Few people in the free and open source software these days have to put up with as much criticism of their motives and moves as the owner of Canonical, Mark Shuttleworth.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 217

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 217
  • Debian Project News - November 8th

Happy birthday Firefox!

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: Six years ago today, (9 November 2004), Firefox 1.0 hit the servers.

Learning to Program

Filed under
Software

goodbyemicrosoft.net: Linux user who wants to learn computer programming. Linux is an excellent choice for this, because there are a huge number of programming languages available for it....and all free.

Taking Nautilus Terminal for a spin

Filed under
Software

scottnesbitt.net: My main ways of getting to the command line are Guake (a drop-down terminal) and the Nautilus open-terminal script. Nothing wrong with either, but I got excited when I heard about Nautilus Terminal.

The new Linux Desktop: Ubuntu's Unity

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The new Linux Desktop: Ubuntu's Unity
  • Ubuntu 11.04 Delayed, Release Schedule Changed
  • Why Wayland is good for the future of Ubuntu, Canonical, etc.
  • It’s All In The Wording
  • Canonical axing X Windows: What will it mean for Ubuntu?
  • Ubuntu Colored - Beautiful Ubuntu Wallpaper Collection
  • Announcing openrespect.org
  • Quick Look: Ubuntu Muslim Edition 10.10 (Sabily Al Quds)
  • Linux Life savers for paranoid penguins

5 reasons why a Debian package is more than a simple file archive

Filed under
Linux
Software

raphaelhertzog.com: You’re probably manipulating Debian packages everyday, but do you know what those files are? This article will show you their bowels…

Why You Should Only Buy Linux Pre-Installed on your Systems

Filed under
Linux

geeksaresexy.net (Mackenzie Morgan): Many Linux users are geeks, and vice versa, and geeks can build their own systems or at least install an OS, so why should we buy systems with Linux pre-installed? Why is it so important if the OS is free? Let’s talk about a little thing called “market share.”

Red Hat Is Last Man Standing in Open Source Market

Filed under
Linux

seekingalpha.com: I took flak recently concerning a blog post that said that Red Hat was no different than IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and most other enterprise software suppliers in terms of business model, despite statements to the contrary by Red Hat CEO James Whitehurst.

Nautilus-Elementary is dead, long live ‘Marlin’

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: The honeymoon is over folks: Nautilus-elementary is no longer being actively developed.

50 Most Frequently Used Linux Commands

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

thegeekstuff.com: This article provides practical examples for 50 most frequently used commands in Linux / UNIX.

24 things we'd change about Linux

Filed under
Linux

techradar.com: If you use Linux long enough, you'll soon discover a list of things you wished were different. Here are 24 things that we wish were different.

Linux: Does Being Competitive with Windows Matter?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

earthweb.com: How many times have you heard this statement: "It's the year of the Linux desktop." Not recently? Then how about "Linux is making gains on the Windows desktop"? Still leaving a bad taste in your mouth? Bet I know why.

Thanks for the $3700, Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

kmandla.wordpress: I have a fun question for Linux users today: What will you do with your US$3700? That’s the money you won’t have to pay to Microsoft, over the course of your lifetime, to use your computer.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 379

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: Trying on a new Fedora
  • News: Ubuntu embraces Wayland, PC-BSD launches first 9.0 snapshot, Mageia announces roadmap, MeeGo's growing pains
  • Questions and answers: Blocking access to inappropriate websites
  • Released last week: Fedora 14, OpenBSD 4.8, Sabayon Linux 5.4 "Experimental Spins"
  • New distributions: CTKArchLive, Fortress Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Compiz to be Rewritten for Ubuntu Wayland

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

ostatic.com/blog: A few days ago I theorized that Mark Shuttleworth's move to Unity on Wayland was an effort to focus his operating system more on mobile devices and, ultimately, cloud-based services. But there's one part of the equation I failed to consider. What about the X11-dependent Compiz?

Hong Kong Jockey Club chooses SUSE

Filed under
SUSE

prnewswire.com (PR): Novell today announced The Hong Kong Jockey Club (HKJC), one of the largest racing organizations in the world, has chosen SUSE® Linux Enterprise Server as the standard operating system for its recent deployments of core information dissemination, integration and access systems.

Also: IBM adopts SUSE for WebSphere Appliances

Shiny open source software for the next generation in schools

Filed under
OSS

blogs.computerworlduk: I just read a press release announcing a Linux alternative to Microsoft’s Multipoint server. Basically the concept is that up to ten PCs can USB-into the server and act as plug and play thin-clients.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE/Qt: Qt Contributor Summit 2018, Integrating Cloud Solutions with Qt, FreeBSD, and Konsole

  • Qt Contributor Summit 2018
    One bit especially interesting is the graphics stack. Back in Qt 5.0, Qt took the liberty of limiting the graphics stack to OpenGL, but the world has changed since: On Windows the only proper stack is Direct3D 12, Apple introduced Metal and recently deprecated OpenGL and Vulkan is coming rather strong. It looks like embracing these systems transparently will be one of the most exciting tasks to achieve. From a KDE & Plasma perspective I don’t think this is scary, OpenGL is here to stay on Linux. We will get a Framework based on a more flexible base and we can continue pushing Plasma, Wayland, Plasma Mobile with confidence that the world won’t be crumbling. And with a bit of luck, if we want some parts to use Vulkan, we’ll have it properly abstracted already.
  • Integrating Cloud Solutions with Qt
    These days, using the cloud for predictive maintenance, analytics or feature updates is a de facto standard in the automation space. Basically, any newly designed product has some server communication at its core. However, the majority of solutions in the field were designed and productized when communication technology was not at today’s level. Still, attempts are being made to attach connectivity to such solutions. The mission statement is to “cloudify” an existing solution, which uses some internal protocol or infrastructure.
  • KDE on FreeBSD – June 2018
    It’s been a while since I wrote about KDE on FreeBSD, what with Calamares and third-party software happening as well. We’re better at keeping the IRC topic up-to-date than a lot of other sources of information (e.g. the FreeBSD quarterly reports, or the f.k.o website, which I’ll just dash off and update after writing this).
  • Konsole’s search tool
    Following my konsole’s experiments from the past week I came here to show something that I’m working on with the VDG, This is the current Konsole’s Search Bar. [...] I started to fix all of those bugs and discovered that most of them happened because we had *one* search bar that was shared between every terminal view, and whenever a terminal was activated we would reposition, reparent, repaint, disconnect, reconnect the search bar. Easiest solution: Each Terminal has it’s own search bar. Setuped only once. The one bug I did not fix was the Opening / Closing one as the searchbar is inside of a layout and layouts would reposition things anyway. All of the above bugs got squashed by just moving it to TerminalDisplay, and the code got also much cleaner as there’s no need to manual intervention in many cases. On the review Kurt – the Konsole maintainer – asked me if I could try to make the Search prettier and as an overlay on top of the Terminal so it would not reposition things when being displayed.

LibreOffice 6.0 Is Now Ready for Mainstream Users and Enterprise Deployments

LibreOffice 6.0.5 is here one and a half months after the LibreOffice 6.0.4 point release to mark the open-source office suite as ready for mainstream users and enterprise deployments. The Document Foundation considers that LibreOffice 6.0 has been tested thoroughly and that it's now ready for use in production, enterprise environments. Until now, The Document Foundation only recommended the LibreOffice 6.0 office suite to bleeding-edge users while urging enterprises and mainstream users to use the well-tested LibreOffice LibreOffice 5.4 series, which reached end of life on June 11, 2018, with the last point release, LibreOffice 5.4.7. Read more

LibreOffice 6.0 Is Now Ready for Mainstream Users and Enterprise Deployments

The Document Foundation informed Softpedia today about the general availability of the fifth point release of the LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite for all supported operating systems. LibreOffice 6.0.5 is here one and a half months after the LibreOffice 6.0.4 point release to mark the open-source office suite as ready for mainstream users and enterprise deployments. The Document Foundation considers that LibreOffice 6.0 has been tested thoroughly and that it's now ready for use in production, enterprise environments. Read more Direct: The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.0.5