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Wednesday, 20 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Chromium Rocks
  • Happy Birthday PCLinuxOS
  • “Linux” support
  • Upstart in Ubuntu 9.10
  • Hudzilla Coding Academy: Assignment Two
  • Ding Dong, The Wicked Vista's DEAD!
  • It's official: we love Windows 7
  • Windows 7 Vodka and the Microsoft Hangover
  • Working together
  • Sabayon FDC09 photos! Here they are!
  • Why XBMC is the best thing on TV
  • Imagination – A lightweight and simple DVD Slideshow Maker
  • FLOSS Weekly 92: MakerBot
  • Meet The Gimp - Episode 124: PS Translation Service

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install a software that comes in a tar.gz package in Linux?
  • Setting IO Scheduler for Maximum Performance on OpenSuSe Linux
  • Encrypt-Decrypt file using OpenSSL
  • How to install Windows 7 and Ubuntu side by side
  • How To Safely Uninstall Ubuntu From A Windows Dual-Boot Environment
  • SheevaPlug Kernel and Gentoo binhost
  • Install Postfix for reliable email delivery
  • Offline Package Management for APT
  • karmic and log rotation
  • Using vSphere Client on Ubuntu Linux with Single Application RDP
  • Axel – ultimate download accelerator for Linux that actually works
  • If Apache mod_rewrite isn’t working…

Create Greetings Using Kreeting Kard

Filed under
Software

everyjoe.com: Wondering how on earth to create a quick greeting card or postcard without having to go through using Scribus or some other software? I grew up in the 80s so I was used to Print Master. Unfortunately I haven’t found anything like this yet. So far, the only one I saw that’s close enough is Kreeting Kard.

Akonadi goes Web2.0

steveire.wordpress: At the recent Akonadi sprint, I decided to spend some time putting together a proof of concept for a web client for Akonadi. Here’s a screencast of the result:

GNU/Linux Security: Linux House vs Microsoft House

blog.eracc.com: This is the second article in my series about GNU/Linux security for the GNU/Linux curious and new GNU/Linux user.

Linux Friendly Audiobooks

berkeleylug.com: When people first think of getting audiobooks online, they probably think of Audible. But, Audible has one really big problem: DRM (Digital Rights Management). There is no application for Linux to play Audible audiobooks, and Android devices don’t support playing Audible files (yet anyway) either. Do not despair, though.

An Amazing Coincidence or Something More Sinister?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

ever-increasing-entropy.blogspot: Yesterday, as anyone involved in computing knows, Windows 7 was released by Microsoft with much marketing hype and fanfare. Canonical chose the day to announce the release candidate of their upcoming Ubuntu Linux 9.10. Hewlett-Packard also did something yesterday, albeit very quietly.

What Windows7 could mean for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet.com/Murphy: I’ve had people using Windows 7 for about three months now, and everything about it so far seems to confirm my first impression that it’s a lot better than Vista. Once you get past the sheer shock of using a Microsoft OS that doesn’t fail daily, however, you start to fret about the things that aren’t there.

Ubuntu 9.10 Review

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 9.10 Review; even better than before
  • Karmic Upgrade Can Break Wireless
  • Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala - A Guided Tour
  • SudUbuntu- A nice icon theme site for ubuntu

Linux frequently asked questions for newbies

Filed under
Linux

tuxradar.com: Here at TuxRadar, and in the magazine behind the website, Linux Format, we get a lot of really basic questions from new users. We've taken the most common questions and printed them verbatim below, providing Plain English answers.

Reviewed: Gnome 2.28

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: The Gnome project's latest release, comes just in time to be bolted on to Karmic Koala. But with KDE making big strides forward with each point release of KDE 4, are the Gnome team doing enough to keep up? Only just... read on to find out more!

OpenSUSE 11.2 the Perfect KDE Distribution

Filed under
SUSE

linuxcrunch.com: While openSUSE community are preparing to release openSUSE 11.2 in the next month, I decide to discover what's new in openSUSE 11.2. I downloaded the RC1 image and start play with it. In short, it is fast, stable and beautiful.

Audio Production in Linux

linuxtoday.com: Audio recording and editing with computers is still in its infancy, and is full of pitfalls. Just figuring out what hardware to use is enough to drive a person to drink. But once you get it all figured out and get everything working, it's fun and powerful.

Let’s all be overjoyed about Windows 7

Filed under
Microsoft

dwasifar.com: What a coup Microsoft has pulled off. After getting millions of people all over the world to shell out for the sugar-frosted turd that was Windows Vista, here we are three years later at the Windows 7 launch, and Microsoft has people practically falling over themselves to pay more money so they don’t have to use Vista any more.

Even The Open Source Community Gets Overly Restrictive At Times

Filed under
OSS

techdirt.com: Reader Brad sent in a fascinating post from a little while back by Steve Streeting, a software developer who created an open source 3D rendering engine called OGRE. In the post, Streeting describes his evolving view on open source licenses.

Beware Open Source Encryption

ddj.com: There's nothing like an official letter from the U.S. Department of Commerce's munitions control office to make you choke on your morning coffee. At least that was my response upon receiving such a notice.

openSUSE Weekly News #94 is out

Filed under
SUSE

news Issue #94 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Talking with Pierre Fricke of Red Hat… about BPM and 'the Stack'
  • Techiemoe tries Windows 7
  • This year's linux.conf.au
  • Open Source conference returns to Portland
  • Open Source Events and Webinars
  • KDE Notebook Shell Search and Launch improvements
  • Training and Support: Still Key to Enterprise Open Source Adoption
  • Why Was The Open Source Guy At The Windows 7 Party?
  • Open source? No good for cost cutting, say CIOs
  • Linux and Security: Mission Impossible?
  • Cloud Computing. Does it have any value at all?
  • Get involved with GNOME Journal
  • From the iPhone to the Cloud: What's new with the Mono Project
  • Linux Outlaws 118 - Naughtify OSD
  • Going Linux: Oct 22 - Computer America #19
  • animations in plasma with javascript on top
  • Eén using Drupal
  • VMware to launch own Linux distro?
  • Choosing a Desktop Linux Distro, Part 2: Installation and Support

Why Adobe likes open source

Filed under
Software
Interviews

h-online.com: He’s the man who brought open source to Silicon Graphics and NEC and advisor to Warburg Pincus on how to make money investing in open source. "At one point I got the title of open source's undercover agent," recalls Dave McAllister. He was recruited by Adobe as Director of open source and standards with a specific mission:

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GNU/Linux, Docker Gain in Rented Space

LibreOffice Help From FSF, Mike Saunders

  • New FSF membership benefit: LibreOffice certification
    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announced that the opportunity to apply for LibreOffice certification for migrations and trainings is now available to FSF Associate Members. LibreOffice is a free software project of The Document Foundation (TDF), a non-profit based in Germany. An office suite, LibreOffice encompasses word processing, and programs for the creation and editing of spreadsheets, slideshows, databases, diagrams and drawings, and mathematical formulae. It uses the ISO standard OpenDocument file format (ODF).
  • Marketing activities so far in 2017: Mike Saunders
    Thanks to donations to The Document Foundation, along with valued contributions from our community, we maintain a small team working on various aspects of LibreOffice including documentation, user interface design, quality assurance, release engineering and marketing. Together with Italo Vignoli, I help with the latter, and today I’ll summarise some of the achievements so far in 2017.

Debian/Ubuntu: Q4OS, Ubuntu Dock and LXD Weekly Status Update

  • There's Now a Windows 10 Installer for the Debian-Based Q4OS Linux Distribution
    The Q4OS development team is pleased to inform us today about the immediate availability for download of a Windows installer for their Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution, Q4OS, allowing users to create a dual-boot environment on their PCs. For those not familiar to Q4OS, it's an open-source and free Linux distro based on the popular Debian GNU/Linux operating system and built around the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE), which resembles the look and feel of the old-school KDE 3.5 desktop environment. Created with an emphasis on Windows users who want to migrate to a free, open-source, and more secure operating system, Q4OS now lets them install the distribution alongside Microsoft Windows in an easy manner, without having to do any modifications to your personal computer or install any other apps.
  • Ubuntu Dock Now Has Dynamic Transparency
    Ubuntu devs have listened to our gripe on the jarring contrast between GNOME 3.26's transparent top bar and the Ubuntu Dock.
  • Ubuntu Dock Features Adaptive Transparency on Ubuntu 17.10, Here's How It Works
    Ubuntu contributor Didier Roche continues his development on the look and feel of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, and today he announced that Ubuntu Dock is getting adaptive transparency. Canonical confirmed that Ubuntu 17.10 would come with the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment by default, though the default session has suffered numerous modifications compared to the vanilla one to make things easier for those using the Unity interface on Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) or Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus). Most probably, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users won't upgrade to Ubuntu 17.10, but we're sure Ubuntu 17.04 users will because it'll reach end of life in about four months from the moment of writing, sometime in January 2018. Therefore, Canonical wants to make their Unity to GNOME transition as painless as possible.
  • LXD: Weekly Status #15
    This week has been pretty quiet as far as upstream changes since half the team was attending the Open Source Summity, the Linux Plumbers Conference and the Linux Security Summit in Los Angeles, California.

Events: KDE/Randa 2017 and Linux Foundation

  • KMyMoney’s Łukasz Wojniłowicz in Randa
    Please read the following guest post from Łukasz who joined me last week in Randa to work on KMyMoney.
  • Randa 2017 – Databases are back to KMyMoney
    On the morning of Day 5 we chased and fixed a problem that was introduced a long time ago but never caused any trouble. The code goes back into the KDE3 version of KMyMoney and was caused by some changes inside Qt5. The fix prevents a crash when saving a transaction which opens an additional dialog to gather more information (e.g. price information). With the help of other devs here in Randa, we were able to drill down the problem and update the code to work on KF5/Qt5 keeping the existing functionality.
  • Randa 2017 – Days 3 and 4
    On Day 3, we started out at 7:02 as usual with the team responsible for breakfast meeting in the kitchen. KMyMoney wise, we worked some more on keyboard navigation and porting to KF5. The dialog to open a database and the logic around it have been rewritten/fixed, so that it is now possible to collect the information from the user and proceed with opening. The database I have on file for testing does not open though due to another problem which I still need to investigate.
  • Watch the Keynote Videos from Open Source Summit in Los Angeles
    If you weren’t able to attend Open Source Summit North America 2017 in Los Angeles, don’t worry! We’ve rounded up the following keynote presentations so you can hear from the experts about the growing impact of open source software.
  • uniprof: Transparent Unikernel for Performance Profiling and Debugging
    Unikernels are small and fast and give Docker a run for its money, while at the same time still giving stronger features of isolation, says Florian Schmidt, a researcher at NEC Europe, who has developed uniprof, a unikernel performance profiler that can also be used for debugging. Schmidt explained more in his presentation at Xen Summit in Budapest in July. Most developers think that unikernels are hard to create and debug. This is not entirely true: Unikernels are a single linked binary that come with a shared address space, which mean you can use gdb. That said, developers do lack tools, such as effective profilers, that would help create and maintain unikernels.