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Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu Touch Emulator Is Now Working For x86 Rianne Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 1:26pm
Story HP Chromebook 11 redesign quietly appears Rianne Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 1:16pm
Story Samsung may announce Glass in September, powered by Tizen? Rianne Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 1:13pm
Story digiKam Software Collection 4.0.0 released Rianne Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 1:03pm
Story Valve Releases New Steam Update with Another Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Fix Rianne Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 12:58pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 11:34am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 11:34am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 11:33am
Story Novena Open Source Laptop Makes Jump To Production After Success Crowd Funding Campaign (video) Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 11:24am
Story Red Hat sees big potential in Indonesia Roy Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 10:23am

Mingle brings group video chat to Linux

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The developers at Collabora have extended Jingle—a multimedia chat protocol for XMPP—so that it can support audio and video conversations with more than two participants. Support for this new XMPP extension, which they call Mingle, could eventually land in Empathy, the GNOME instant messaging client.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Yes, Linux can run Crysis!

  • Microsoft Should Worry Less About Live, More About Linux
  • I Want Sandy Back, Says Open Source Project
  • WiMAX deal "clears" Linux for takeoff
  • Yet another reason to use Linux instead of (Windows) Vista
  • From Evolution to Thunderbird (Part II)
  • Tux on a Groom's Cake
  • Q & A: Keith Curtis on Open Source
  • Nokia eyes wider use of Linux software in phones
  • SilverStone Fortress FT01
  • The Linux Newb: The Install
  • Mozilla Developer News Dec 02
  • Gentoo New Mplayer Real Support, dvdnav support
  • OpenOffice's UI will be getting a refurb
  • Reason to stay with Ubuntu 8.04
  • MySQL 5.1 released with crashing bugs
  • 40 Open Source Tools for Protecting Your Privacy
  • Blender Render Grid
  • Trumpet Windows Loudly--- Except When It's Malware Outbreaks
  • Open source phone gains "fat" distro

some howtos & such

Filed under
HowTos
  • The Best Way To View Youtube in Ubuntu

  • OMG! I am running out of memory. What to do?
  • Hidden Linux : Doing the joins
  • Predicting Solaris 10 TCP Sequence Numbers Part 1: Initial Discovery
  • urpmi tricks
  • Keeping an eye on your network with PasTmon
  • Using Linux to Overcome Comcast's Policy of FUD
  • HowTo use Dig to check if a DNS server is using random source ports
  • Gentoo, build it like Lego.
  • Vim as typewriting tutor
  • Different signal handling under FreeBSD and Linux
  • Mandriva : Fixing input drivers issues in Cooker
  • Add right-click virus scanning capability to Nautilus
  • Where is All The Disk Space Going?
  • Dealing with Command Line Options in Python

Open-source developers set out software road map for 2020

Filed under
OSS

linuxworld.com (IDG): A group of open-source software advocates set out a road map for the software industry through 2020 at the Open World Forum conference in Paris on Tuesday.

Various Mandriva Things

Filed under
MDV

Frederik's Blog: Mandriva decided to end the contracts of at least Adam Williamson, Mandriva's community manager and Oden Eriksson, maintainer of the Apache, MySQL, PHP stack and other related packages. This has triggered a haevy reaction from the community now, with a public letter to the CEO being written, an online petition and people deciding not to spend money anymore to Mandriva, but instead spent it on other free software projects.

Konqueror is losing my conquest.

Filed under
KDE

it.toolbox.com/blogs: KDE comes with the everything including the kitchen sink konqueror program which acts as a file manager and browser although the file management part is being slowly replaced by dolphin. This leaves konquerors role to be primarily a web browser.

Silverlight for Linux : Moonlight 1.0 almost complete

Filed under
Software

heise-online.co.uk: The beta version of Moonlight 1.0 is now available to download as a Firefox plug-in. The application, is the Linux version of Microsoft's rival to Flash, Silverlight. It makes it possible to play files such as WMV files under Linux.

NVIDIA 180.11 Linux Driver Released

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: This afternoon, NVIDIA has pushed out another driver. The 180.11 Beta brings in a couple of fixes and improvements.

Open Source iTunes Competitor Songbird Officially Released

Filed under
Software

blog.wired.com: Songbird is like an open source version of iTunes that handles just about everything that program does, while swapping out the iTunes store interface in favor of the world's music blogs.

Hands-on: KDE 4.2 beta 1 brings impressive improvements

Filed under
KDE

arstechnica.com: The first beta release of KDE 4.2, the next major version in the KDE 4 series, was made available for download last week. Thousands of bugs have been fixed since the 4.1 release and many aspects of the environment are starting to feel very smooth and polished.

Whassup with Netbooks?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.zdnet.com: It has suddenly become fashionable to diss the Netbook. Some of the blame goes to Intel, which didn’t understand who its buyers might be.

Excelixis 1.0: A new workbench

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Excelixis is the awkwardly-renamed latest version of what was previously known as Workbench Linux. I liked that distro very much, so I was curious to see what (if any) improvements had been made.

Mozilla slates second Firefox 3.0 auto-update this week

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Mozilla Corp. said today that it will take another stab this week at convincing users running older versions of its Firefox browser to update to Version 3.0.

OpenSolaris 2008.11 is ready

Filed under
OS

heise-online.co.uk: The OpenSolaris project developers have released the final version 2008.11, four weeks after the release candidate and in line with their six-monthly release cycle. Apart from Firefox 3, Gnome 2.24 and OpenOffice 3, which are mainly intended for desktop use, the operating system also offers a complete web stack.

Three graphical mount managers

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Mounting and unmounting filesystems used to be straightforward in GNU/Linux. However, with the addition of udev and the demand for hotswapping USB devices the process is now more complicated. That is where graphical mount managers such as Forelex Mount Manager, PySDM, and MountManager find their niche.

Fedora Project Taking Ideas For Next Release Name

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Distribution naming schemes are one of the more humorous aspects of the open source community. The Fedora Project is calling for suggestions on what to name Fedora 11.

Debian Project News - December 2nd

Filed under
Linux

debian.org: Welcome to this year's 16th issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Topics covered in this issue include: Etch-and-a-half installation images updated, GNU Affero General Public License suitable for Debian main, and Security Teams Meeting in Essen.

You're Never Too Old For Linux

Filed under
Linux

oneclicklinux.com: November 30th was a milestone birthday for me! I hit the big Five-OH! Fifty! This 50th birthday made me realize that you're never too old to learn something new.

Bugzilla 3.2 has shiny NASA interface enhancements

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Mozilla has announced the official release of Bugzilla 3.2, a significant new version that adds a large number of major improvements.

Just what does it take to switch to desktop Linux (part 2)?

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.com: Plenty of folks took my challenge to sort out just what it would take to switch from Windows to desktop Linux. Here are the highlights from the talkbacks, though, with some important considerations.

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More in Tux Machines

Hardware With Linux

  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale
    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted. That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.
  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here
    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.
  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux
    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.
  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market
    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion. Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Project launches updated Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 with bug fixes
    An updated version of Debian, a popular Linux distribution is now available for users to download and install. According to the post on the Debian website by Debian Project, the new version is 8.7. This is the seventh update to the Debian eight distribution, and the update primarily focuses on fixing bugs and security problems. This update also includes some adjustments to fix serious problems present in the previous version.
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2016
    The number of sponsored hours did not increase but a new silver sponsor is in the process of joining. We are only missing another silver sponsor (or two to four bronze sponsors) to reach our objective of funding the equivalent of a full time position.
  • APK, images and other stuff.
    Also, I was pleased to see F-droid Verification Server as a sign of F-droid progress on reproducible builds effort - I hope these changes to diffoscope will help them!
  • Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" KDE Gets a Beta Release, Ships with KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS
    After landing on the official download channels a few days ago, the Beta version of the upcoming Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" KDE Edition operating system got today, January 16, 2017, an official announcement. The KDE Edition is the last in the new Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" stable series to be published, and it was delayed a little bit because Clement Lefebvre and his team wanted it to ship with latest KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment from the Kubuntu Backports PPA repository.
  • Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.10 — Ubuntu GNOME, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Xubuntu In One ISO
    Linux AIO is a multiboot ISO carrying different flavors of a single Linux distribution and eases you from the pain of keeping different bootable USBs. The latest Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.10 is now available for download in both 64-bit and 32-bit versions. It features various Ubuntu flavors including Ubuntu GNOME, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Xubuntu.

Top Ubuntu Editing Apps: Image, Audio, Video

It's been my experience that most people aren't aware of the scope of creative software available for Ubuntu. The reason for this is complicated, but I suspect it mostly comes down to the functional availability provided by each application title for the Linux desktop. In this article, I'm going to give you an introduction to some of the best creative software applications for Ubuntu (and other Linux distros). Read more

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Google's open-source Draco promises to squeeze richer 3D worlds into the web, gaming, and VR
    Google has published a set of open source libraries that should improve the storage and transmission of 3D graphics, which could help deliver more detailed 3D apps.
  • Why every business should consider an open source point of sale system
    Point of sale (POS) systems have come a long way from the days of simple cash registers that rang up purchases. Today, POS systems can be all-in-one solutions that include payment processing, inventory management, marketing tools, and more. Retailers can receive daily reports on their cash flow and labor costs, often from a mobile device. The POS is the lifeblood of a business, and that means you need to choose one carefully. There are a ton of options out there, but if you want to save money, adapt to changing business needs, and keep up with technological advances, you would be wise to consider an open source system. An open source POS, where the source code is exposed for your use, offers significant advantages over a proprietary system that keeps its code rigidly under wraps.
  • Can academic faculty members teach with Wikipedia?
    Since 2010, 29,000 students have completed the Wiki Ed program. They have added 25 million words to Wikipedia, or the equivalent of 85,000 printed pages of content. This is 66% of the total words in the last print edition of Encyclopedia Britannica. When Wiki Ed students are most active, they are contributing 10% of all the content being added to underdeveloped, academic content areas on Wikipedia.
  • AMD HSA IL / BRIG Front-End Still Hoping To Get Into GCC 7
    For many months now there's been work on an AMD HSA IL front-end for GCC with supporting the BRIG binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language (HSA IL). It's getting late into GCC 7 development and onwards to its final development stage while this new front-end has yet to be merged. Developer Pekka Jääskeläinen has been trying to get in the finishing reviews and changes for getting approval to land this BRIG front-end into the GNU Compiler Collection. It's a big addition and with GCC 7 soon just focusing on wrong-code fixes, bug fixes, and documentation fixes starting on 19 January, there would be just a few days left to land this new front-end for GCC 7 to avoid having to wait until next year for it to debut in stable with GCC 8.
  • Rcpp 0.12.9: Next round
    Yesterday afternoon, the nineth update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp made it to the CRAN network for GNU R. Windows binaries have by now been generated; and the package was updated in Debian too. This 0.12.9 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, the 0.12.7 release in September, and the 0.12.8 release in November --- making it the thirteenth release at the steady bi-montly release frequency. Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing GNU R with C or C++ code. As of today, 906 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further. That is up by sixthythree packages over the two months since the last release -- or about a package a day!