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Sunday, 24 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora 23 Is Now Cleared For Release Rianne Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 6:04pm
Story The Gaming Paradox: There just aren't enough Free and Open Source video games Rianne Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 5:58pm
Story Why systemd is a practical tool for sys admins Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 5:10pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 4:45pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 4:43pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 4:42pm
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 4:40pm
Story Leftovers: Debian Family Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 4:38pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 4:36pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 4:26pm

NZ Open Source Awards winners announced

Filed under
OSS

geekzone.co.nz: This evening the NZ Open Source Awards 2010 celebrated and rewarded the best and most innovative in New Zealand’s open source software at a gala event attended by more than 200 people at the Intercontinental Wellington.

Installing Nginx With PHP5 (And PHP-FPM) And MySQL Support On Ubuntu 10.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Nginx (pronounced "engine x") is a free, open-source, high-performance HTTP server. Nginx is known for its stability, rich feature set, simple configuration, and low resource consumption. This tutorial shows how you can install Nginx on an Ubuntu 10.10 server with PHP5 support (through PHP-FPM) and MySQL support.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • The browser wars: side with Opera.
  • Shhh... Opera holds the web's most valuable secret
  • Fedora Scholarship Program Encourages Open Source Innovation
  • A Few Tips on Managing Access Remotely
  • Open core by the numbers
  • Smackdown: Linux on X64 Versus IBM i on Entry Power 7XXs
  • FSFLA: Linux kernel is "open core"
  • First peek at the new look ‘Do’ launcher (Gnome-do)
  • Remmina to be Ubuntu’s new remote desktop app
  • How do I compile my windows programs under Linux?
  • BetterMeans: a new app for running your organization the open source way
  • GNU Spotlight with Karl Berry (October 2010)
  • Video uploading/downloading to feature in Shotwell 0.8
  • Playing with EDID and rawhide
  • Five alternative apps for ALT+F2
  • Mageia Roadmap
  • Mandriva first to include virtualization technologies at the system level
  • Linux Alternative To Windows MultiPoint Server 2010 Goes Into Beta
  • KDEMU with Ian Monroe
  • Fedora Board Meeting, 8 Nov 2010
  • Icelandic developer receives Nordic Free Software Award
  • GNOME Shell 2.91.2 released
  • Procurement Jobs: Desktop Productivity Tools 'Key To Open Source'
  • Savvytek achieves Red Hat partnership in Saudi and Qatar

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Barcode Writer in Pure PostScript
  • Google CL for Linux explained
  • Wireshark II: The Analysis
  • How to upgrade (convert) ext3 to ext4 file system
  • Build a Linux Web Server With An Old Computer [Part 2]
  • Introduction to awk
  • Last.fm Mix radio with the linux client
  • Creating a Betfair Bot Part 2
  • KDE 4.5.3 available for Mandriva 2010
  • Panflute: Control Your Favourite Music Player From Gnome Panel
  • Secure Your PC and Website From Firesheep Session Hijacking
  • Finding all mysql user privileges
  • Gting to know Alice
  • Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat in VirtualBox
  • speed up the booting process for Grub2 boot loader using profiling
  • More Layers
  • How To: Change run levels in Linux
  • Install Ubuntu Maverick On Your Mac Virtualbox
  • Install MyPaint

Alternative Linux distros that deserve the limelight

Filed under
Linux

apcmag.com: Ubuntu might be the most popular Linux, but there are two other desktop distributions which have a lot to offer but aren't getting the publicity they deserve, says Ashton Mills.

Shuttleworth: critics would do well to get a clue

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Few people in the free and open source software these days have to put up with as much criticism of their motives and moves as the owner of Canonical, Mark Shuttleworth.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 217

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 217
  • Debian Project News - November 8th

Happy birthday Firefox!

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: Six years ago today, (9 November 2004), Firefox 1.0 hit the servers.

Learning to Program

Filed under
Software

goodbyemicrosoft.net: Linux user who wants to learn computer programming. Linux is an excellent choice for this, because there are a huge number of programming languages available for it....and all free.

Taking Nautilus Terminal for a spin

Filed under
Software

scottnesbitt.net: My main ways of getting to the command line are Guake (a drop-down terminal) and the Nautilus open-terminal script. Nothing wrong with either, but I got excited when I heard about Nautilus Terminal.

The new Linux Desktop: Ubuntu's Unity

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The new Linux Desktop: Ubuntu's Unity
  • Ubuntu 11.04 Delayed, Release Schedule Changed
  • Why Wayland is good for the future of Ubuntu, Canonical, etc.
  • It’s All In The Wording
  • Canonical axing X Windows: What will it mean for Ubuntu?
  • Ubuntu Colored - Beautiful Ubuntu Wallpaper Collection
  • Announcing openrespect.org
  • Quick Look: Ubuntu Muslim Edition 10.10 (Sabily Al Quds)
  • Linux Life savers for paranoid penguins

5 reasons why a Debian package is more than a simple file archive

Filed under
Linux
Software

raphaelhertzog.com: You’re probably manipulating Debian packages everyday, but do you know what those files are? This article will show you their bowels…

Why You Should Only Buy Linux Pre-Installed on your Systems

Filed under
Linux

geeksaresexy.net (Mackenzie Morgan): Many Linux users are geeks, and vice versa, and geeks can build their own systems or at least install an OS, so why should we buy systems with Linux pre-installed? Why is it so important if the OS is free? Let’s talk about a little thing called “market share.”

Red Hat Is Last Man Standing in Open Source Market

Filed under
Linux

seekingalpha.com: I took flak recently concerning a blog post that said that Red Hat was no different than IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and most other enterprise software suppliers in terms of business model, despite statements to the contrary by Red Hat CEO James Whitehurst.

Nautilus-Elementary is dead, long live ‘Marlin’

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: The honeymoon is over folks: Nautilus-elementary is no longer being actively developed.

50 Most Frequently Used Linux Commands

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

thegeekstuff.com: This article provides practical examples for 50 most frequently used commands in Linux / UNIX.

24 things we'd change about Linux

Filed under
Linux

techradar.com: If you use Linux long enough, you'll soon discover a list of things you wished were different. Here are 24 things that we wish were different.

Linux: Does Being Competitive with Windows Matter?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

earthweb.com: How many times have you heard this statement: "It's the year of the Linux desktop." Not recently? Then how about "Linux is making gains on the Windows desktop"? Still leaving a bad taste in your mouth? Bet I know why.

Thanks for the $3700, Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

kmandla.wordpress: I have a fun question for Linux users today: What will you do with your US$3700? That’s the money you won’t have to pay to Microsoft, over the course of your lifetime, to use your computer.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 379

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: Trying on a new Fedora
  • News: Ubuntu embraces Wayland, PC-BSD launches first 9.0 snapshot, Mageia announces roadmap, MeeGo's growing pains
  • Questions and answers: Blocking access to inappropriate websites
  • Released last week: Fedora 14, OpenBSD 4.8, Sabayon Linux 5.4 "Experimental Spins"
  • New distributions: CTKArchLive, Fortress Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.

A GTK+ 3 update

  • A GTK+ 3 update
    When we started development towards GTK+ 4, we laid out a plan that said GTK+ 3.22 would be the final, stable branch of GTK+ 3. And we’ve stuck to this for a while. I has served us reasonably well — GTK+ 3 stopped changing in drastic ways, which was well-received, and we are finally seeing applications moving from GTK+ 2.
  • GTK+ 3.24 To Deliver Some New Features While Waiting For GTK4
    While the GNOME tool-kit developers have been hard at work on GTK4 roughly the past two years and have kept GTK3 frozen at GTK+ 3.22, a GTK+ 3.24 release is now being worked on to deliver some new features until GTK+ 4.0 is ready to be released. While GTK+ 4.0 is shaping up well and GTK+ 3.22 was planned to be the last GTK3 stable release, the developers have had second thoughts due to GTK+ 4 taking time to mature. Some limited new features are being offered up in the GTK+ 3.24 release to debut this September.

Finally: First stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5

After almost exactly two years of being work-in-progress, the first stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5 has been published! You can grab the sources at your local KDE mirror. Some distributions like ArchLinux already ship binary packages. After one beta and one release candidate, now comes the final release. You may wonder why this release gets version number 0.8.1 but not 0.8 as expected. This is simply due to the fact that I noticed a bug in CMakeLists.txt when computing version numbers which did not work if the version number just had two fields, i. e. no ‘patch’ version. As the code and the tag of 0.8 was already pushed, I had no alternative than to fix the problem and increase the version number. Otherwise, the ChangeLog (alternative view) is virtually unchanged compared to the last pre-release. Read more

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