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Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Poll Linus srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 10:46pm
Story Enlightenment E17 Stands A Chance For Fedora 20 srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 10:39pm
Story Collusion: See who’s tracking you – in real-time srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 10:38pm
Story Why I left Ubuntu srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 8:17pm
Story Crunchbang Movin’ on up srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 8:14pm
Story Memory usage improvements for KDEPIM 4.11 srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 8:13pm
Story Happy 20th Anniversary, Slackware! srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 8:12pm
Story Linux for Workgroups and Microsoft's Open Source Relationship srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 4:51pm
Story Surprise Attack launches Australia's first indie publisher srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 4:50pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 6:26am

Translate words with EuroOffice Dictionary extension

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Need a multilingual dictionary tool that allows you to quickly translate words and expressions without leaving the convenience of OpenOffice.org? Drop in the EuroOffice.org Dictionary (EOD) extension.

few early morning howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Filesystem & file organization in Linux

  • Accessing Remember the Milk from your Ubuntu Desktop
  • Finding The Number Of Open File Descriptors Per Process On Linux And Unix

Getting To Grips With Netpkg In Zenwalk 5.2

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: All the usual review issues - the installer, the artwork, the applications, the hardware detection, yada, yada, yada – are all fine and dandy in Zenwalk 5.2. Really, they are – there's not a bad thing to be said about any of it. So, what am I going to write about? Netpkg.

Music players: so much choice, but…

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: Music players in Linux are a dime a dozen. Even if you don’t count the media players like VLC and mplayer, there are still enough that will manage and play your music collection. I’m pretty sure I’ve tried them all at this point…and I still haven’t found one I’m perfectly satisfied with.

Netbooks pre-loaded with Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

markshuttleworth.com: The Canonical OEM team has been approached by a number of OEM’s who want to sell netbooks (small, low-cost laptops with an emphasis on the web) based on Ubuntu. Almost universally, they’ve asked for standard Ubuntu packages and updates, with an app launcher that’s more suited to new users and has the feeling of a “device” more than a PC.

The impact of the Eee PC

Filed under
Hardware

itpro.co.uk: Had most people in IT even heard of Asus' Eee PC a year ago? Probably not. Yet its impact has been nothing short of remarkable...

Linux captures the 'green' flag, beats Windows 2008 power-saving measures

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com: Independent tests show that Red Hat Linux pulls as much as 12% less power than Windows 2008 on identical hardware

Rock star Linux: remixed, unplugged and live

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Ubuntu is on the verge of enhancing its already good name as the most end-user friendly Linux distribution by coming out with its own mobile-optimised release, Ubuntu Netbook Remix. We're on the tip of a revolution and here's why.

Michael Chen: India Third-Largest Contributor To Fedora Community

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

efytimes.com: Michael Chen, director, Red Hat was recently on a visit to India. In an interview with Swapnil Bhartiya, assistant editor, EFYtimes.com, Chen elucidated upon various issues ranging from the awareness about Linux and open source to India's strengths and the challenges the country is facing in the open source world. Here are some excerpts from the lively exchange.

Linux kernel compile secrets. Part 3

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

blogs.ittoolbox.com: In the previous episode of Linux kernel compile secrets. Part 2. I went through various methods on collecting the hardware data necessary for configuring your kernel. Now comes the head scratching, brow furrowing and hair pulling time of deciding which options to choose. Now while I cannot go through every single choice in detail. I intend to highlight the important ones that can make or break your kernel.

Openoffice.org mailing labels solution

My daughter is getting married this Summer, and she purchased some weird Avery return address labels for invitees to RSVP whether they plan to attend. The labels have an Avery number of 18195. I have no MS-Windows workstations at home, and I couldn't find an Openoffice.org Writer template for this particular label stock. What to do?

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How Ultra-portable Laptops will help Linux

  • Linux Training
  • Gates Says Linux Best OS Ever
  • Mark Shuttleworth buys MicroSoft codecs for Ubuntu
  • The best Ubuntu-Look I cud find - Ubuntu Studio Look
  • So much for "community" in the Linux community
  • There is only one Linux!!!

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Cracking ubuntu 8.04 to work with nVidia 8200 chipset motherboard

  • HowTo recompile Debian packages
  • Creating a bootable USB from an iso
  • Share files between 2 ubuntu computers
  • KVM and Virt-Manager On Ubuntu 8.04
  • Vim Tip: Save file with root permissions

Slackware 12.1 - The Newest Version of the Oldest Surviving Linux Distribution

Filed under
Slack

news.oreilly.com: Last month I wrote in my Entropy (personal) blog about the failures of two of my computer systems. I ended up wiping the hard drive. I chose to install two Linux distributions in a dual boot configuration and decided to take a good long look at the oldest surviving Linux distribution and one of the first ones I worked with: Slackware. A new release, 12.1, came out early in May so this seemed like the perfect time to take a look at the venerable distro.

Absolute 12.1: Still not the Vodka

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Absolute Linux, according to its website, is an attempt to take Slackware and make it more convenient with a few well-placed scripts. This sort of thing is right up my alley, as my biggest complaint with Slackware has always been the manual nature of it.

Some Cooker news as of 2008-06-08

Filed under
MDV

linux-wizard.net: Ok, here are some quick news from Cooker :

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #94

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 94 for the weeks June 1st - June 7th, 2008 is now available. In this issue we cover: Ubuntu Global Bug Jam, New Members, Newly Approved LoCos, Canonical Showcases Ubuntu Netbook Remix at Computex, Kubuntu Specs in Full, Ubuntu at OSCON, Ubuntu Server receives positive reviews, Mobile devices driving Ubuntu-Shuttleworth, Ubuntu UK podcast #7, Acer bets big on Linux, and much, much more!

People wonder why I don’t use windows

Filed under
Linux

tsunam.org: I’ll give a prime example. Wanted to watch a netflix movie tonight, so of course its a windows IE only application. I boot into windows, and its the second time so I decide to do some windows updates as I’m sure there’s updates that need to be applied to make use of the movie player. I do 11 patches.

Ghextris: tetris clone with a hexagonal makeover

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: The object of the game is much the same as with tetris, only the frame and the falling objects are hexagons. You have to slot the coloured pieces together making rows, which disappear once they are complete, the game ends if the stack of pieces reaches the celling.

Is Second Place Good Enough In Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

thevarguy.com: In our “winner take all” society, The VAR Guy is starting to wonder: Can open source companies like Concursive, Compiere and EnterpriseDB ever escape from the shadows of their larger and more successful rivals (SugarCRM and MySQL)? Before you answer, consider these lessons.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box