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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story PiCore 5.3 Linux is a 25MB operating system for the Raspberry Pi Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2014 - 1:33am
Story CoreOS Linux distro lands on the Google Cloud Platform Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2014 - 1:30am
Story Week in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2014 - 1:19am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2014 - 1:00am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2014 - 12:59am
Story try out the calendar app california on Fedora 20 Rianne Schestowitz 22/05/2014 - 9:03pm
Story Easing Linux Into the Enterprise Rianne Schestowitz 22/05/2014 - 8:57pm
Story Rugged Android 4.0 handheld does NFC Rianne Schestowitz 22/05/2014 - 7:41pm
Story Updated Fedora 20 KDE Stack: Something's Funky Rianne Schestowitz 22/05/2014 - 6:54pm
Story Pale Moon: Firefox Without DRM, Interface Breakage Rianne Schestowitz 22/05/2014 - 6:45pm

Archlinux - More Trouble than It’s Worth?

Filed under
Linux

bitburners.com: This is a review-like story about my experiences with the Archlinux Linux distribution. I’ve been using Arch for half an year now and I’ve been quite impressed with it.

Fear Not the Linux Command Line!

Filed under
HowTos

linuxplanet.com: Most recent converts to Linux spend most of their time in the GUI -- the graphical desktop (whether Gnome, or KDE, or XFCE, or some other interface) that's made to look and act somewhat like Windows and Mac. But if you spend all your time in the GUI, you're missing out.

OpenOffice.org 3

Filed under
OOo

linuxworld.com (MacWorld): OpenOffice.org is a powerful productivity suite--including tools for word processing, spreadsheets, slideshows and more--with one major additional feature: it's free.

Jack’s best linux tips and features

Filed under
HowTos

blogs.techrepublic.com: Jack regularly moonlights in the 10 Things blog and occasionally even infiltrates the Windows blog! It’s time to round up some of his Linux-related articles that you might have missed.

How KDE and Kubuntu lost a devotee

Filed under
KDE

How about "just using" instead of "migrating"?

Filed under
Linux

Take a big, deep breath and repeat after me, "There is no perfect OS, there is no perfect OS".

OK, fine, now read this.

When bugtracking systems are being fenced

Filed under
Software

dag.wieers.com/blog: Today, in my quest for a media center solution that suits me, I started fixing some issues with running Elisa on CentOS 5. The Elisa project is using Launchpad for bugtracking and project management and so I created an account to send a few patches.

Two New Linux Beta Distributions

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/community/blog: If you're interested in new Linux distributions, here are a couple of new Betas that I have taken a quick look at:

OpenSolaris 2008.11: Its Time Is Coming

Filed under
OS

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: I was attracted to OpenSolaris 2008.11 in the first place by a couple of other internet articles. Solaris is a Unix-based operating system introduced by Sun Microsystems in 1992 as the successor to SunOS, and OpenSolaris is its Open Source spin-off.

Thoughts on Linux migration

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
  • Thoughts on Linux migration

  • Why I Switched From Ubuntu To Vista
  • Beranger Sucks!

Sabayon Recruiting Beta Team Testers

Filed under
Linux

planet.sabayonlinux: Once again Sabayon Linux is looking to grow. We are looking for a small group of 30 people or so to do beta testing. We’ll have a mailing list and irc room setup for the group to use.

Debian Lenny (5.0) Release Date

Filed under
Linux

blogs.koolwal.net: If you are wondering, like me, what happened to the Debian’s upcoming release a.k.a Lenny/5.0, here is a short story for you curious types.

Unboxing the CherryPal: It’s alive!

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

tgdaily.com: After much skepticism due to poor company communication, I can admit I was extremely pleased to have the small CherryPal box hit my doorstep. So, I can confirm that the CherryPal does exist, well sorta.

Installing ubuntu-system-panel (USP) On Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

ubuntu-system-panel is a simple launcher for the GNOME desktop, providing easy access to Places, Applications and common configuration items for your computer. This guide shows how to install and configure it on an Ubuntu 8.10 desktop.

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • openSUSE: Linux for the Lazy

  • Why Geeks Love Drupal
  • Chrome, Firefox, IE Reveal no Major Bugs
  • Work Imitates Life On Linux - Some Surrealism For A Change
  • Don't forget to Smolt
  • 3D desktop revealed in Apple patent filing
  • HP gives SUSE Linux a try: The world yawns in disbelief
  • The Evolution of a Programmer
  • On the adoption of CPAL and the AGPLv3
  • Boekenbeurs using Drupal
  • Compiling A Debian Kernel
  • Review: Firefox 3.1 Beta 2 adds speed and privacy
  • More Pre-installs, More Market Share
  • Spending a Day with Ubuntu
  • OR operator for Grep
  • UDS developer interviews
  • Brazil Seeks 150,000 GNU/Linux Notebooks for 300 Schools

OpenSolaris now on Toshiba laptops

Filed under
OS

zdnet.com.au: Sun has reached an agreement with Toshiba to pre-install the OpenSolaris operating system on Toshiba laptops. The laptops will be available in the US from early 2009.

6 Ways to Get Much More Out of GIMP

Filed under
GIMP

ostatic.com/blog: GIMP, the GNU Image Manipulation Program, is a long-standing and hugely respected open source graphics program, and many readers probably already use it. The GIMP site has many useful resources for the application, and there are also a lot of other places to visit for turning yourself into a power user.

Red Hat and Novell duke it out in real time

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: When it comes to processing financial transactions, money can be won or lost in milliseconds. That's why high throughput, low latency, and consistent latency for transactions are the name of the game. Financial institutions are fanatical about their market data and trading systems, and Linux distros want to cash in on that.

4000 Attendees at French Team Ubuntu Release Party

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: Every 6 months, the French Team holds release parties. For Ubuntu 8.10, a release party was held in Paris with 12 install parties throughout France. 4000 people attended the event, which broke the record from last year, almost 3000 visitors!

Igniting Linux Desktop Security

Filed under
Software

securiteam.com: Long ago, my all-time favorite desktop firewall was none other than sygate pro (symantec junkies sought-and-destroyed a while back). But like most other desktop firewalls, sygate is/was windows only. But this article isn’t about just any desktop firewall; it is about Firestarter, the Linux GUI firewall solution.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat's Survey in India

From Raspberry Pi to Supercomputers to the Cloud: The Linux Operating System

Linux is widely used in corporations now as the basis for everything from file servers to web servers to network security servers. The no-cost as well as commercial availability of distributions makes it an obvious choice in many scenarios. Distributions of Linux now power machines as small as the tiny Raspberry Pi to the largest supercomputers in the world. There is a wide variety of minimal and security hardened distributions, some of them designed for GPU workloads. Read more

IBM’s Systems With GNU/Linux

  • IBM Gives Power Systems Rebates For Linux Workloads
    Big Blue has made no secret whatsoever that it wants to ride the Linux wave up with the Power Systems platform, and its marketeers are doing what they can to sweeten the hardware deals as best they can without adversely affecting the top and bottom line at IBM in general and the Power Systems division in particular to help that Linux cause along.
  • Drilling Down Into IBM’s System Group
    The most obvious thing is that IBM’s revenues and profits continue to shrink, but the downside is getting smaller and smaller, and we think that IBM’s core systems business will start to level out this year and maybe even grow by the third or fourth quarter, depending on when Power9-based Power Systems and z14-based System z mainframes hit the market. In the final period of 2016, IBM’s overall revenues were $21.77 billion, down 1.1 percent from a year ago, and net income rose by nearly a point to $4.5 billion. This is sure a lot better than a year ago, when IBM’s revenues fell by 8.4 percent to $22 billion and its net income fell by 18.6 percent to $4.46 billion. For the full 2016 year, IBM’s revenues were off 2.1 percent to $79.85 billion, but its “real” systems business, which includes servers, storage, switching, systems software, databases, transaction monitors, and tech support and financing for its own iron, fell by 8.3 percent to $26.1 billion. (That’s our estimate; IBM does not break out sales this way, but we have some pretty good guesses on how it all breaks down.)

Security News

  • DB Ransom Attacks Spread to CouchDB and Hadoop [Ed: Get sysadmins who know what they are doing, as misconfigurations are expensive]
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • Return on Risk Investment
  • Widely used WebEx plugin for Chrome will execute attack code—patch now!
    The Chrome browser extension for Cisco Systems WebEx communications and collaboration service was just updated to fix a vulnerability that leaves all 20 million users susceptible to drive-by attacks that can be carried out by just about any website they visit.
  • DDoS attacks larger, more frequent and complex says Arbor
    Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks are becoming more frequent and complex, forcing businesses to deploy purpose-built DDoS protection solutions, according to a new infrastructure security report which warns that the threat landscape has been transformed by the emergence of Internet of Things (IoT) botnets. The annual worldwide infrastructure security report from Arbor Networks - the security division of NETSCOUT - reveals that the largest distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack reported in 2016 was 800 Gbps, a 60% increase over 2015’s largest attack of 500 Gbps.