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Tuesday, 28 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

PCLinuxOS: Radically simple and a bit boring for geeks

Filed under
PCLOS

osgeex.blogspot: Today I gave the new PCLinuxOS 2009.1 a spin and planned to write a review. The "Problem" with PCLinuxOS is: it actually is radically simple.

I love openSUSE

Filed under
SUSE

gogoboygo.com/blog: I’m a convert from Ubuntu, after several years with that distribution of Linux, and the difference between Ubuntu 8.10 and OpenSuse 11.1 is night and day.

Debian: Absence of a General Purpose installable CD or DVD Media

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Debian is the best, most stable, and the biggest community distro! No doubt about it. I liked its latest, Lenny very much. But all the way from downloading it and installing was not a joyride.

HackMy...phase II

For those of you who don't know, Hackmy... forums started out as a "advanced" forum for users of PCLinuxOS.

HackMy has moved to a new host and has a whole new look and goal though. Hackmy is now open to users of Linux, ANY distro.

First Look: PCLinuxOS 2009.1 GNOME

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PCLOS

news.softpedia.com: I used to be one of PCLinuxOS' fans and I especially enjoyed the GNOME flavor so hearing that the team was ready to finally launch a new version sparkled a lot of interest in me.

OzOS Linux - The Wizard or the Tinman?

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: I like exotic distributions. The promise of the beautiful E17 windows manager on top of the lightweight Xubuntu is what drew me to this little known distribution. Hence, this review.

15 Interesting Facts About the Linux Kernel

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Linux

junauza.com: Exactly 15 years ago, on March 1994, Linux kernel version 1.0.0 was humbly released for the world to tinker with. To celebrate the historic moment, I have collected some really interesting facts about the Linux kernel.

Intro to V4L2

Filed under
Software

linuxdevices.com: This articles describes the Linux's V4L2 (Video for Linux 2) interface, along with the first steps toward developing a device driver that uses the interface. It is based on Linux 2.6.28, and may not apply to other kernel versions.

The Advantages Of Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

seogadget.co.uk: Bob Smiley left a fantastic comment on my blog a few days back. The comment was so rich, detailed and lengthy that it justifies a blog post all on its own. So, Bob Smiley summarises the advantages of Ubuntu.

The Linux Leap of Faith

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Linux

mr-oss.com: It is easy to sit on the Linux bandwagon and shout about how running Linux could solve all your problems. It's also easy to see that this just isn't really true.

The Application Installation Situation on Linux Distros

Filed under
Linux

blog.ibeentoubuntu: Installing apps under most distributions is rather simple. When it's not simple, though, it becomes a lot more difficult. Easy is dead easy. Everything else is pretty difficult.

Use The Tools

Filed under
Linux

pthree.org: When I taught Linux system administrators, I would go through a series of rules, and rule #1 was always: Whenever you’re editing config files, and a tool exists to make the change, use the tool instead of editing the config by hand.

Life Without Proprietary Software: Is It Possible?

Filed under
OSS

workswithu.com: Someone on the Ubuntu forums started an interesting thread today asking, “Can you manage to use only free software on your pc?“ It got me thinking about my dependency on proprietary software, and whether I’d ever really be able to get it out of my life entirely.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux Gaining Strength In Downturn

  • PCLinuxOS 2009.1 Bounces Back with a Bang
  • Schools to benefit from £30m open source project, first in UK
  • Famous firsts: Wireless
  • 1 In 3 IT Shops Uses Combo Proprietary, Open Source Software
  • Open Sources Episode 8 -- obey your Puppet master
  • Buying a netbook Linux vs. Windows XP
  • VirtualBox 2.1.4
  • Fancy Schmancy or Fine and Functional?
  • Ubuntu OpenOffice.org using gvfs fuse now
  • Rethinking OSS business model classifications
  • PC moment for open source may lack profit
  • FOSS Debates, Part 2: Standard Deviations
  • OOo Compare: Inadequate
  • VDPAU + OpenGL 3.0 On Gallium3D This Summer?
  • Shining Light on Why Microsoft Loves LAMP to Death
  • Finland warms up to Open Source for Public Adminstration
  • Unix and Linux Cartoons For The Weekend
  • Debian Project updates Package Policy
  • iPhone suffers as Android buoys Linux cause
  • Opera Turbo Labs release
  • 10 Extreme Biases You Must Acquire When Switching to Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • FFMPEG-0.5 Compile for Mandriva 2009.0

  • last and history
  • Bash Shell Temporarily Disable an Alias
  • Easy Linux Log Viewing with Log Viewer
  • Really rapid C++ development with KDevelop4
  • Remove columns from text
  • Delete Files from my Linux Trashbin- Solution
  • Jaunty: Apt is broken? Move to another country
  • Linux basics: Learn common commands
  • Enigmail Makes Encrypting Email Easy
  • VMware arrow keys issues
  • Install Android Fonts (ttf-droid) on Arch Linux
  • Quick Fix: Black Desktop Background and Lost Icons

W3C Stats, Linux, Mac, and Windows -- Relevant?

Filed under
OS

blog.ibeentoubuntu: The above graph shows the OS stats for W3C since March, 2003. Side-stepping the debate over whether the stats are an accurate representation of the OS share, I'd like to look at the trends.

Midori: Extremely Fast and Standards-Compliant

Filed under
Software

tombuntu.com: Midori is a lightweight GTK web browser which uses the popular WebKit rendering engine. I installed it on my Eee PC netbook to see if it could replace Firefox for light browsing.

5 Compiz Effects That Are Actually Useful

Filed under
Software

linuxhaxor.net: Compiz has a lot of nice effects that are mostly useless. In my quest to find a work place without distraction compiz effects doesn’t really fit it. Here are five effects that I actually found useful:

Ubuntu For Non-Geeks, 3rd Edition: A Big Thumbs Up

Filed under
Reviews

linuxtoday.com/blog: I prefer a direct approach: show me. Which "Ubuntu For Non-Geeks, 3rd Edition: A Pain-Free, Project-Based, Get-Things-Done Guidebook" does in a most excellent fashion.

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