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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story System76 Oryx Pro is a Skylake-powered Ubuntu laptop with NVIDIA GPU and G-SYNC Rianne Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 1:31am
Story The Race to Develop an Open-Source Voting System Is On Rianne Schestowitz 30/10/2015 - 1:27am
Story Skimming Files Before You Grep Them matthartley 30/10/2015 - 1:09am
Story Google killing Chrome OS and building it into Android Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2015 - 10:57pm
Story Innovative Finnish mini-PC runs Linux on Tegra K1 Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2015 - 10:51pm
Story Red Hat is boring -- and more open source companies should emulate it Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2015 - 8:14pm
Story Element 14 to Bake Custom Raspberry Pi's Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2015 - 8:09pm
Story Python and Java Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2015 - 7:21pm
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2015 - 7:19pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2015 - 7:18pm

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 148 is out

Filed under
SUSE

In the issue 148 you can read:

* Run…Or Help Run!
* Kostas Koudaras: 11.3 Late Launch Party
* Rares Aioanei: kernel weekly news – 06.11.2010

Sabayon 5.4 E17 review

Filed under
Linux

linuxbsdos.com: Sabayon 5.4 E17 is one of several “Experimental Spins” of Sabayon Linux released just this week. It is based on E17, version 0.17 of Enlightenment, a multi-platform stacking window manager and desktop environment.

Comparing Netbook Desktops - Part 3, Jolicloud

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blogs: Third in the sequence of Linux netbook desktops I am going to compare is Jolicloud. Doing this comparison might be a bit unfair right now, because the next release of Jolicloud, 1.1, is due out literally "any day now."

November 2010 Issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The NEW PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the November 2010 issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine. In the November 2010 issue: LXDE: Tips & Tricks, Get Slick With xbindkeys, and Shotwell: A Lightweight Linux Image Handler.

Why your desktop still matters

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software

linux-magazine.com: I was surprised by the passion generated by my blog entry last week about Ubuntu's decision to replace GNOME with its own Unity desktop. Apparently, contrary to the pundits and usability experts, users have strong feelings about their interfaces of choice.

Ubuntu Drops CLI For DOS Prompt

Filed under
Ubuntu
Humor

lockergnome.com: It wasn’t bad enough when last week it was announced that Ubuntu would be dropping the Gnome interface for Unity. The teeth-gnashing has already started because Ubuntu is dropping X for Wayland. But you ain’t seen nothing yet, folks.

Linux kernel performance is as good as ever, benchmarks show

Filed under
Linux

linuxfordevices.com: Phoronix has published the results of benchmarks performed on 26 Linux kernels dating back five years, from Linux 2.6.12 to a pre-release version of the upcoming Linux 2.6.37. Despite the addition of numerous features over the years, the results show remarkable consistency.

A hell of a time

  • Sexual Assualt at ApacheCon
  • Previous incident at SouthEast LinuxFest
  • Listening to Our Better Angels
  • commonality and community

Wayland or Waylaid?

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Wayland or Waylaid?
  • FOLLOW-UP: General Disillusionment with Ubuntu
  • My Thoughts On Ubuntu's Decision to Dump X Server
  • New Ubiquity slide-show for Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Blender 2.5 Beta 3 released
  • Devil's dollars drive Open Source
  • Introducing students to the world of open source: Day 1
  • OLPC Art: Can you do this with Paint Activity?
  • Mockup for Integrated Music Playback in Nautilus
  • Monster 2 2.0 Released
  • The Forking OpenOffice Community Bodes Well For Users
  • Google Soups Up Apache With New Speed Module
  • GCC 4.5 unmasking and etc.
  • How Default App Installs Can Compromise Apache
  • Open Source: Money versus Mindshare
  • Microsoft Releases F# Under Open Source License
  • Mandriva’s New cooker manager
  • Linux Outlaws 173 - GPL Black Ops

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Install and Play 'True Combat: Elite' on Ubuntu
  • Lets deal with oddity : Remove files with special char in them
  • Stop the blinking wireless LED light on Ubuntu 10.10 laptops
  • Wireshark: An Ethereal Experience
  • GNOME Gconf Registry Cleaner - Gconf Cleaner
  • Display your real name in MeMenu

Kubuntu 10.10 Technical Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

muktware.com: When I first started using Linux about 6 years ago I ran Mandrake with KDE. So KDE holds a special place in my geek heart. I always gave Kubuntu a spin but never felt that it held its ground next to its Gnome sibling, Ubuntu. However,

talk about openSUSE

Filed under
SUSE
  • talk about openSUSE
  • Milestone 3 delayed

Thinking About X

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Thinking About X
  • Why Ubuntu Linux Is a Good Business Choice
  • Making Our World More Respectful
  • Huge Ubuntu Changes to Come (Unity review)
  • The X.Org Plans In Ubuntu 11.04, Again

10 Myths & Reasons

  • 10 Reasons Open Source Is Good for Business
  • Ten myths that plague Linux

Kraft - A Useful Tool for Invoices etc.

Filed under
Software

about.com: If you are doing contracting or have a small business, you want to have some inexpensive tools to help you do your paperwork, such as offers and invoices, in an efficient and professional manner.

Fusion Linux 14 - Distro Review

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Fusion Linux aims to do for Fedora what distros such as Linux Mint, PinguyOS, and Zorin did for Ubuntu. It aims to alleviate much of the messy setup work that is required to get a fully functional desktop.

Linux Commands for 99 Bottles of Beer

Filed under
Linux
HowTos
Humor

linuxplanet.com: Linux server admins need good scripting skills and command-line chops, but who says they can't be fun? Learn Bash Karaoke with 99 Bottles of Beer on the Wall, quickly find disk hogs, and display used/free disk space.

Casting My Vote for Fedora 14

Filed under
Linux
  • Casting My Vote for Fedora 14
  • Fedora 14 - A Take On Its New Features
  • Fedora 14 - A very smooth release!

Is Shuttleworth Crazy, Brave, or Smart?

Filed under
Ubuntu

ostatic.com: Last week Mark Shuttleworth dropped the bomb that the next release of Ubuntu, 11.04, would ship with Unity as the default window manager. But yesterday he went even further - he announced that Ubuntu would be moving to Wayland graphical server as well. Has Shuttleworth lost his mind? Or does he know something we don't?

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation on Value of GNU/Linux Skills

  • Jobs Report: Rapid Growth in Demand for Open-Source Tech Talent
    The need for open-source technology skills are on the rise and companies and organizations continue to increase their recruitment of open-source technology talent, while offering additional training and certification opportunities for existing staff in order to fill skills gaps, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report, released today by The Linux Foundation and Dice. 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open-source talent, and nearly half (48%) report their organizations have begun to support open-source projects with code or other resources for the explicit reason of recruiting individuals with those software skills. After a hiatus, Linux skills are back on top as the most sought after skill with 80% of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise. 55% of employers are now also offering to pay for employee certifications, up from 47% in 2017 and only 34% in 2016.
  • Market value of open source skills on the up
    The demand for open source technology skills is soaring, however, 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open source talent, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report which was released this week.
  • SD Times news digest: Linux Foundation releases open-source jobs report, Android Studio 3.2 beta and Rust 1.27
    The Linux Foundation in collaboration with Dice.com has revealed the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report. The report is designed to examine trends in open-source careers as well as find out which skills are the most in demand. Key findings included 83 percent of hiring managers believes hiring open source talent is a priority and Linux is the most in-demand open-source skill. In addition, 57 percent of hiring managers are looking for people with container skills and many organizations are starting to get more involved in open-source in order to attract developers.

GNU/Linux Servers as Buzzwords: "Cloud" and "IaaS"

  • Linux: The new frontier of enterprise in the cloud
    Well obviously, like you mentioned, we've been a Linux company for a long time. We've really seen Linux expand along the lines of a lot of the things that are happening in the enterprise. We're seeing more and more enterprise infrastructure become software centric or software defined. Red Hat's expanded their portfolio in storage, in automation with the Ansible platform. And then the really big trend lately with Linux has been Linux containers and technologies like [Google] Cooper Netties. So, we're seeing enterprises want to build new applications. We're seeing the infrastructure be more software defined. Linux ends up becoming the foundation for a lot of the things going on in enterprise IT these days.
  • Why next-generation IaaS is likely to be open source
    This is partly down to Kubernetes, which has done much to popularise container technology, helped by its association with Docker and others, which has ushered in a period of explosive innovation in the ‘container platform’ space. This is where Kubernetes stands out, and today it could hold the key to the future of IaaS.

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more