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Saturday, 23 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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BeleniX 0.7 OpenSolaris Desktop

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: Long before Sun's Project Indiana came about, BeleniX has been one of our favorite GNU/Solaris distributions. BeleniX has been a LiveCD based upon OpenSolaris, but with yesterday's release of BeleniX 0.7 it is now a source-level derivative of the Project Indiana blend of OpenSolaris. Today we're taking a quick look at this new release.

Tips & Tricks from PCLinuxOS Forum

Filed under
PCLOS

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Visiting PCLinuxOS Forum has been one of my hobbies. It updates my linux computing skills by providing me with the most practical solutions. Here is a list of some important tips and tricks directly from PCLinuxOS Forum.

Linux for Grandma - Part III, Finale

Filed under
Linux

technocrat.net: It has been a few months since I have set my 83-year old grandmother with a desktop PC running Kubuntu 7.10. I configured everything in advance. I gave her some basic training on the things she will do regularly.

A Salute to Ubuntu Volunteers

Filed under
Ubuntu

tycheent.wordpress: Recently, on another site, someone suggested that the development and marketing of Ubuntu was done by paid staff of Canonical. Having been actively involved in the Arizona Team for 8 months I would like to say that I consider such a comment to be FUD fostered for the sole purpose of disparaging against Ubuntu and the people that make it work.

Emulation station: GP2X F-200 gaming handheld reviewed

Filed under
Hardware
Gaming

arstechnica.com: For the uninitiated, the GP2X is a line of handheld, personal entertainment players manufactured by a South Korean company called GamePark Holdings. We're reviewing the latest version, the GP2X F-200. The GP2X F-200 offers an open source, multifunctional, alternative to the proprietary handheld systems currently offered at retail in North America.

Asus Eee 900 to hit shelves on 1 May

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

news.zdnet: The second version of Asus' low-cost subnotebook, the Eee PC, will go on sale on 1 May. The Eee 900, which will come with an operating-system choice of Linux or Windows, will cost £329. The Linux version will have 20GB of solid-state storage on-board.

Also: ASUS Eee PC 900 review roundup

Review: Dream Linux 3.0 - Is It Really A Dream?

Filed under
Linux

adventuresinopensource.blogspot: Today's victim... sorry guest is the Brazilian distribution Dream Linux 3.0, a Debian-based distro I'd heard quite a bit about but never actually used. After a while out of the game would I still remember how to do this? Well, I'll leave that up to you to judge but here's how I got on...

Ubuntu takes early lead in Open Source Census

Filed under
OSS

community.zdnet: Ninety percent of participants have Ubuntu, and about half are in the US (with an impressive and results-bending 33 percent from Finland). Two thirds of them are small businesses (ten to 49 people).

Ubuntu Linux upgrade: Why you should try it

Filed under
Ubuntu

computerworlduk.com: If there is a single complaint that is laid at the feet of Linux time and time again, it's that the operating system is too complicated and arcane for casual computer users to tolerate. Ubuntu, the user-friendly distribution sponsored by Mark Shuttleworth's Canonical, has made a mission out of dispelling such complaints entirely.

Green PCs: CPU frequency scaling in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux.org: Electricity bills got higher again? Does your computer waste too many power cycles? Or perpahs you just don’t feel green enough? In any case, this article is for you! You’ll learn how to save energy and CPU cycles with your Linux box, no matter how old it is.

Linux: Sexy, Smart, and Cheap. The Perfect Date.

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Yes yes, I realize it's no surprise we feel pretty attached to Linux here at Linux Journal, but that aside, what's not to love about Linux? Especially in the last few years, it's no longer a matter of whether Linux is ready for the desktop yet -- it's just a matter of when are people going to realize it? Thankfully, we're starting to see that. And here's why:

Your Linux Skills - Use them or lose them

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: I've been noticing a disturbing trend among Linux users of late, myself included, that has begun to bother me enough to necessitate writing this short article. What is this trend? It's a general loss of the Linux skillsets that so many of us senior users have gained over the years.

A GNOME-based Desktop on Demand

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Desktop on Demand (DOD) is the latest contender to give users a full-fledged remote desktop instead of Web-based applications to help users to stay productive when they are on the move. Similar to Ulteo, DOD gives you a full-blown remote Linux-based desktop -- but that's where the similarity ends.

Songbird media player: the love child of Mozilla and WinAmp

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Ian McKellar gave a presentation on the Songbird media player at LugRadio Live this past weekend. The talk introduced some of the underlying goals behind the Songbird project and included a demonstration of some of the core technologies in the Songbird media player.

Google closed source app engine does evil

Filed under
Google

itwire.com: This time Google App Engine gives the great promise of letting you serve your own applications to the world using the grunt of Google-powered machinery. However, it’s not the saviour it purports to be, perverting the open source way.

Also: Google says “sod it... lets do a bit of evil”
And: Google Earth 4.3

Get rid of your Linux bloat. Part 1.

Filed under
Linux

blogs.ittoolbox: Your Linux is bloated. Its fat and waddles around like the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man of Ghostbusters fame. It limps along like a legless slug. It crawls along slower than dead turtle. There are many things you can do to optimise your system.

Medusa4 - a powerful software tool for free

Filed under
Software

linux-tip.net: CAD Schroer released the Fourth Generation of the globally renowned MEDUSA engineering product suite. Its powerful software tools were developed to work the way engineers do, helping you get product to market faster, and designs to customers quicker and more efficiently.

some leftovers

Filed under
News
  • The making of Wine (how to make Windows apps merrier with Linux)

  • Taking a closer look at the Opera browser
  • My not-so-positive ramblings on the Asus EEEPC
  • Open-source anti-virus scanner hit by exploit
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 6th April 2008
  • Upgrading to 8.04
  • Gentoo Safe Flags
  • Kernel space: memory allocation failures
  • 4 months and 10 days without any new Debian developer. Is Debian dying?

Where Novell Can Beat Microsoft

Filed under
SUSE

thevarguy.com: The VAR Guy admits it: He left Novell for dead last year. But recent conversations with the company forced him to rethink all of those negative notions. In a few markets, Novell may actually thrive. And in one particular market, Novell could give Microsoft a run for its money.

Also: Novell slashes mainframe Linux pricing

Just 10 Years of Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

openlogic.com/blogs: Abhijit Nadgouda says it's been a decade since the term open source was chosen to represent the concept. This is true, but the concept has been around far longer. Sure, it has forever changed the way software is created and consumed, but why now all of a sudden?

Also: What Hurts Them Helps Us: How Open Source Benefits from the Bad

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Android, Chromebook Make a Sweet Couple

Running Android apps on a Chromebook gives the Chrome OS added functionality. It has the potential to morph the Chromebook into a portable computing device that offers the best of two Linux worlds. Still, Google engineers have some tinkering to do before Android apps and the Chrome OS are fully implemented and functional. This transition will not be complete until the Google Play Store works out of the box on new Chromebooks without users having to "upgrade" through Developer's Mode. Read more

A Grand Experiment

The latest debacle over the "forced" upgrade to Windows 10 and Apple's increasingly locked-in ecosystem has got me thinking. Do I really need to use a proprietary operating system to get work done? And while I'm at it, do I need to use commercial cloud services to store my data? I've always used Linux since the first time I tried installing Slackware in the mid-90s. In 1998 we were the first national TV show to install Linux live (Red Hat). And I've often advocated Ubuntu to people with older computers. I usually have at least one computer running Linux around, in the past couple of years Dell XPS laptops have been great choices. And a couple of months ago I bought a 17" Oryx laptop from System76, an Ubuntu system integrator, for use in studio. But as time went by, even Ubuntu began to seem too commercial to me, and I've migrated to community supported Debian testing and the Arch-based Antergos distros for everything. (i use Antergos on my Oryx on the shows.) Read more Also: Microsoft lays off remaining handful of Microsoft Press staff

Karbonn confirms Android One smartphone(s) launching in Q1 next year

In an interview with TOI Tech, Karbonn Mobiles has confirmed it will be introducing new Android One-based smartphone(s) early next year. Karbonn's Managing Director Pradeep Jain said the company is in talks with Google for Android One, and we might see some Android One smartphone launch(es) in Q1 of next year. Read more