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Monday, 27 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux kernel 1.0 turns 15 years old

Filed under
Linux

tuxradar.com: That's right -- it's a day short of a decade and a half since Linus Torvalds announced version 1.0 of his kernel.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • The Ubuntu Lightweight Minnow

  • Review: Knoppix 6
  • Microsoft Releases Open Tools for Scientific Research
  • Open Source Use On The Rise, But Management Policies Lag
  • Is open source the next 'PC moment'?
  • A New Software Manifesto for India
  • Open Source 3D Landscape Generators
  • A classification of open source business strategies
  • "Netbooks" Play Sidekick To Laptop
  • Google CEO Eric Schmidt on Subsidized Netbooks, Mobile TV Plans
  • Microsoft exec appointed to DHS post
  • A Real Stimulus: Use Open Source Software
  • RKWard - Advanced Free Statistical Data Analysis Tool
  • Open Source's Amateur Wealth Creation is Priceless
  • Interview with Nick Mailer
  • The Power of Zypper

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • bugs in ext4

  • How To Be Part Of A Supercomputer With BOINC
  • Migrating from Trac to Redmine
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Kernel Update Has Broken Wired Connection
  • Open Multiple Terminals in Single Windows using Terminator
  • How to Moonlight
  • Repair Corrupt RPM databases
  • Sexy server administration
  • How can I avoid running a python script multiple times?
  • Find The Fastest Arch Linux Reposity Mirror(s) With Rankmirror

  • polyglot: bash me harder
  • Setting up NTP in Gentoo

Xubuntu 8.10 + Xfce 4.6: Screenshots

Filed under
Software

zdnet.com.au: If GNOME feels like it is too bulky and KDE is not the Linux desktop answer that you are looking for, then you should consider the Xubuntu distribution that ships with the Xfce desktop.

UT3 Linux Still Undergoing Work, No ETA

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: Unreal Tournament 3 was released back on the 17th of November in 2007. Nearly a year and a half later, we still have no UT3 Linux client.

Programming languages that melt your brain

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: In their day-to-day jobs, coders naturally focus on the more commonly used languages, such as PHP, Python and SDL, but there are plenty of more left-field choices, such as Ruby and assembly, that are well worth learning.

PC Vendors: Put up or shut up on the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: I was really happy when Dell started selling mainstream PCs with pre-installed Ubuntu Linux. Other companies started shipping mass-market PCs and notebooks with Linux too. Well. Sort of. You see, except for Dell, everyone makes it a pain to get their Linux-enabled PCs. And, I'm sick of it.

Renoise 2.0

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Soundtrackers are cool. They let musicians create music in a style reminiscent of the way assembler programmers write code. Notes become numbers and timing becomes a position in a list. Renoise is a proprietary sound tracker for Windows, OS X and Linux.

Firefox 3.1 Beta 3 now available for download

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: Firefox 3.1 Beta 3 is now available for download. This milestone is focused on testing the core functionality provided by many new features and changes to the platform scheduled for Firefox 3.1.

Two Reasons the Command Line Trumps the Graphical User Interface

Filed under
Software

blog.eracc.com: I am not a text mode Luddite. I use a graphical user interface (GUI) every day. However, for certain tasks a GUI is just not the best choice.

Supercomputer niche chucks rocks at Nehalem

Filed under
Gentoo
Hardware

theregister.co.uk: As niche supercomputer-maker SiCortex works on the next generation of its line and watches the IT marketing machine gearing up for Intel's impending Nehalem-based Xeon EP, the company says that Chipzilla isn't moving in the right direction for high-performance computing (HPC) workloads.

Why Is Moblin's X.Org Stack Faster Than In Ubuntu?

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Canonical's Scott James Remnant recently set out to explore why X.Org started up so much faster on Moblin than on Ubuntu.

O hai Knoppix

Filed under
Linux

newlinuxuser.com: I’ve successfully download the latest version of Knoppix and it’s now running live from my USB drive. Awesome, ain’t it?

TomTom Linux impact light hit so far

Filed under
Legal

blogs.the451group: I’ve been talking to device manufacturers and the Linux-centered software providers and I can definitively report that I am not hearing or sensing any fear, uncertainty or doubt (FUD) as a result of Microsoft’s TomTom patent suit.

Kernel Log: What's new in 2.6.29 - Part 5

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: It will be at least another week or two before Linux kernel 2.6.29 becomes available. The Kernel Log will, therefore, continue its report about the new features scheduled for 2.6.29 with what's new in terms of file systems.

Delayed allocation and the zero-length file problem

Filed under
Software

thunk.org/tytso: A recent Ubuntu bug has gotten slashdotted, and has started raising a lot of questions about the safety of using ext4. The essential “problem” is that ext4 implements something called delayed allocation.

The Free Beer Economy

Filed under
OSS

linuxjournal.com: Why is FREE! the world's best-selling noun, verb, adjective and adverb, yet so hard to credit as a foundation for business in the Internet Age? And what will happen when business folk finally grok the abundant opportunities that FREE! provides?

Russia Rolls Out Open Source for Government

Filed under
OSS

opendotdotdot.blogspot: Russia is rapidly turning into open source's best-kept secret. I wrote about plans to roll out free software to all schools; more recently, there has been talk about creating a Russian operating system based on Fedora. And now there's this:

Mozilla Contemplates a Future Without Google

Filed under
Moz/FF

businessweek.com: Google also shows up all over the balance sheet of Mozilla, creator of the Firefox browser and other software. To date, the arrangement has proved mutually beneficial. How much longer this pairing can last has been called into question since September.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Blockchain Startups Venture Beyond Bitcoin
    Bitcoin is the most widely-known example of blockchain-based technology, but many of today's startups are looking past the cryptocurrency and towards other, more business-friendly implementations. European blockchain startup incubator Outlier Ventures and Frost & Sullivan have mapped out the blockchain startup landscape, identifying several key areas of activity. It outlines possible paths to success following a busy year for blockchain investments.
  • Another Sandy Bridge Era Motherboard Now Supported By Coreboot
    The Sapphire Pure Platinum H61 is the latest motherboard to be supported by mainline Coreboot for replacing the board's proprietary BIOS.
  • OSI Welcomes the Journal of Open Source Software as Affiliate Member
    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), a global non-profit organization formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and communities, announced that the Journal Of Open Source Software (JOSS), a peer-reviewed journal for open source research software packages, is now an OSI affiliate member.
  • Open source project uses Docker for serverless computing
    Serverless computing has fast become a staple presence on major clouds, from Amazon to Azure. It’s also inspiring open source projects designed to make the concept of functions as a service useful to individual developers. The latest of these projects, called simply Functions as a Service (FaaS) by developer and Linux User contributor Alex Ellis, uses Docker and its native Swarm cluster management technology to package any process as a function available through a web API.
  • PyCharm 2017.1, MicroStrategy 2017.1, Next.js 2.0, and Ubuntu 17.04 final beta released — SD Times news digest: March 27, 2017
  • Open source JavaScript, Node.js devs get NPM Orgs for free
    The SaaS-based tool, which features capabilities like role-based access control, semantic versioning, and package discovery, now can be used on public code on the NPM registry, NPM Inc. said on Wednesday. Developers can transition between solo projects, public group projects, and commercial projects, and users with private registries can use Orgs to combine code from public and private packages into a single project.
  • Slaying Monoliths at Netflix with Node.js
    The growing number of Netflix subscribers -- nearing 85 million at the time of this Node.js Interactive talk -- has generated a number of scaling challenges for the company. In his talk, Yunong Xiao, Principal Software Engineer at Netflix, describes these challenges and explains how the company went from delivering content to a global audience on an ever-growing number of platforms, to supporting all modern browsers, gaming consoles, smart TVs, and beyond. He also looks at how this led to radically modifying their delivery framework to make it more flexible and resilient.
  • Mudlet, the open source MUD client has a new major stable build available
    I don't know how many of you play MUDs, but Mudlet, an open source cross-platform MUD client has hit version 3.0.

today's howtos

Minimal Linux Live

Minimal Linux Live is, as the name suggests, a very minimal Linux distribution which can be run live from a CD, DVD or USB thumb drive. One of the things which set Minimal Linux Live (MLL) apart from other distributions is that, while the distribution is available through a 7MB ISO file download, the project is designed to be built from source code using a shell script. The idea is that we can download scripts that will build MLL on an existing Linux distribution. Assuming we have the proper compiler tools on our current distribution, simply running a single shell script and waiting a while will produce a bootable ISO featuring the MLL operating system. Yet another option the MLL project gives us is running the distribution inside a web browser using a JavaScript virtual machine. The browser-based virtual machine running MLL can be found on the project's website, under the Emulator tab. This gives us a chance to try out the operating system in our web browser without installing or building anything. I decided to try the MLL build process to see if it would work and how long it would take if everything went smoothly. I also wanted to find out just how much functionality such a small distribution could offer. The project's documentation mostly covers building MLL on Ubuntu and Linux Mint and so I decided to build MLL on a copy of Ubuntu 16.04 I had running in a virtual machine. The steps to build MLL are fairly straight forward. On Ubuntu, we first install six packages to make sure we have all the required dependencies. Then we download an archive containing MLL's build scripts. Then we unpack the archive and run the build script. We just need to type four commands in Ubuntu's virtual terminal to kick-start the build process. Read more

GCC Compiler Tests At A Variety Of Optimization Levels Using Clear Linux

For those curious about the impact of GCC compiler optimization levels, a variety of benchmarks were carried out using GCC 6.3 on Intel's Clear Linux platform. Read more Also: LLVM 4.0.1 Planning, Aiming For Better Stable Releases