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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Native Android apps are coming to Chrome OS Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 1:00am
Story Google touts 1 billion active Android users per month Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 12:55am
Story Neptune 4.0 Release with new homepage Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 12:51am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 12:36am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 12:34am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 12:34am
Story Google I/O Offers Devs Big Bonanza Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 11:47pm
Story Windows wars? The Android and Chrome OS Alliance Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 11:43pm
Story Qt 5.3.1 Released Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 9:44pm
Story This is the Gear Live, Samsung's $199 Android Wear Smartwatch Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 9:41pm

Linux, Are You Our Hero?

Filed under
Linux

serverwatch.com: Many see Linux as the hero that can save us — save us from continuous hardware upgrades with each major software revision, confusing licensing programs, hidden costs and fees and vendor lock-in. With that said, is Linux our hero? The obvious answer is yes, but is it a true hero or just the hero of the month?

OLPC giving 5,000 laptops to Gaza children

Filed under
OLPC

masshightech.com: Just two weeks after announcing layoffs and salary reductions, One Laptop per Child is donating 5,000 of its XO laptops to Palestinian children in the Gaza strip.

Backup and synchronize your personal data in Windows and Linux

Filed under
HowTos

dedoimedo.com: In this article, I will show you a pair of highly useful programs that can help you backup and synchronize your data: Karen's Power Tools Replicator for Windows and Unison File Synchronizer for Linux.

Firm finds gain after open-source shift pain

Filed under
OSS

news.cnet.com: It's nice to read what open-source vendors think of open source: it's easy, cheap, and quite possibly the cure for cancer. (That last one is my personal hope.)

Also: Intalio planning '8 to 10' open-source acquisitions

French Lawmakers Hope to Inspire Linux Revolution

Filed under
Linux

bits.blogs.nytimes: If the French National Assembly gets its way, the open-source Linux operating system will take over the governments of Europe, seizing on a weak economy to displace Windows.

Christophe fergeau replaces Pixel at Mandriva

Filed under
MDV

cfergeau.blogspot: The good news is that I started working at Mandriva 2 weeks ago. I'll be working on the core distro to (partially) replace pixel which means I'll hack on urpmi and bootloaders among tons of other things.

Don’t Use Zypper to Upgrade OpenSuse

Filed under
SUSE

scott.sherrillmix: I installed OpenSuse on my work computer and I’ve been really happy with it so far. Recently, OpenSuse came out with a new version 11.1 so I figured I would upgrade. Since this was my first time updating, I turned to google and the first result for “upgrade opensuse 11.1″ is this page about zypper. It sure sounds easy.

HP's Mini 1000: Sometimes a Road Warrior Needs a Good Peashooter

Filed under
Hardware

technewsworld.com: Maybe the biggest adjustment one has to make to use a netbook is the physical tininess of the keyboard and touchpad. HP's Mini 1000 makes good use of a small space and delivers a passable keyboard, but the touchpad still puts the buttons off to the side, which is much less comfortable.

Liberation fonts for Linux

blogs.computerworld: I was reminded yesterday that just because I know something, doesn't mean that everyone knows it. This time it was some friends who really didn't like their current fonts in Ubuntu and OpenSolaris respectively. So, I suggested that they try Red Hat's open-source Liberation fonts. To my surprise, it turns out they didn't know about them.

The "Microsofting" of Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: While we love to hammer at proprietary companies like Microsoft for "dumbing down" the interaction for users, it's something of a shock when we realize that some Linux distros are doing the exact same thing.

Another reason to use Linux: Maximum burning speed!

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: For those looking for yet another reason to switch to Linux, I offer you this simple fact. CD's and DVD's burned on Linux tend to be processed faster, are more stable, better quality.

Linux can save your business.

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs/locutus: In these hard times I am seeing businesses dropping like flies. Even the big boys are talking about and acting on the laying off of thousands of workers. As always in these sort of situations what is a disaster for some is an opportunity for others. What is one mans pain is another's pleasure so to speak.

Is the Open Standards Alliance Betraying Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com/blogs: Interoperability has always been at the heart of the Open Solutions Alliance. There was, it is true, a slight blurring of the focus, as reflected in the name: Open *Solutions* Alliance, not Open *Source* Alliance.

Migration from Microsoft to Linux - O, the Joy

Filed under
Linux

therantzone.blogspot: So I finally made the plunge. I've long wanted to be part of that geeky elite who broke from the crowd, stepped aside from their fellow computer lemmings and took a different plunge - instead of off the cliff, but into an alien and poorly understood (by the masses) computer operating system - Unix.

LCA2009: That mysterious thing called the kernel

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: For the last four years, the pony-tailed Jonathan Corbet, kernel developer and editor, has presented what he calls the kernel report at Australia's national Linux conference.

Linus Torvalds on regression, laziness and having his code rejected

Filed under
Linux

apcmag.com: Want to know what happens if you suggest a way to fix Linux that might solve a major difficulty, but also introduce new problems? To quote Linus Torvalds: " I laugh in your face!"

Interview with Daniel Holbach, Ubuntu Community Developer

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

oneopensource.it: Daniel Holbach works for Canonical where is involved in the Ubuntu Community, taking care the relationship with the MOTU team, the Ubuntu developers. Daniel gave us an interview where he speaks about his own work.

Living free with Linux: 2 weeks without Windows

Filed under
Ubuntu

computerworld.com: It's one of those perennial age-old battles that can never be resolved. Coke or Pepsi? Chocolate or vanilla? Linux or Windows?

Linux CD Ripping Utilities

Filed under
Software

thelinuxblog.com: CD Ripping with Linux doesn’t have to be the labor intensive task that it once was. No longer do we have the days of writing a hundred character command to rip a CD with the perfect options. Here are some utilities aimed at making your life of ripping your collection of CD’s to a digital format you can actually use.

Calls for open source government

Filed under
OSS

news.bbc.co.uk: The secret to a more secure and cost effective government is through open source technologies and products. The claim comes from Scott McNealy, a co-founder of Sun Microsystems.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Security Leftovers

  • Java and Python FTP attacks can punch holes through firewalls
    The Java and Python runtimes fail to properly validate FTP URLs, which can potentially allow attackers to punch holes through firewalls to access local networks. On Saturday, security researcher Alexander Klink disclosed an interesting attack where exploiting an XXE (XML External Entity) vulnerability in a Java application can be used to send emails.
  • Microsoft: no plans to patch known bugs before March [Ed: Microsoft is keeping open 'back doors' that are publicly known about, not just secret ones]
    Microsoft has no plans to issue updates for two vulnerabilities, one a zero-day and the other being one publicised by Google, before the scheduled date for its next round of updates rolls around in March. The company did not issue any updates in February, even though it had been scheduled to switch to a new system from this month onwards. It gave no reason for this, apart from saying: "This month, we discovered a last minute issue that could impact some customers and was not resolved in time for our planned updates today. "After considering all options, we made the decision to delay this month’s updates. We apologise for any inconvenience caused by this change to the existing plan." The Google-disclosed bug was made public last week, and is said to be a flaw in the Windows graphic device interface library that can be exploited both locally and remotely to read the contents of a user's memory.
  • Microsoft issues critical security patches, but leaves zero-day flaws at risk
    Microsoft has patched "critical" security vulnerabilities in its browsers, but has left at least two zero-day flaws with public exploit code. The software giant released numerous patches late on Tuesday to fix flaws in Adobe Flash for customers using Internet Explorer on Windows 8.1 and later, as well as Edge for Windows 10.

Red Hat News

  • Why upstream contributions matter when developing open source NFV solutions.
    When software is developed using open source methods, an upstream repository of the code is accessible to all members of the project. Members contribute to the code, test it, write documentation and can create a solution from that code to use or distribute under license. If an organization follows the main stream or branch of the upstream code their solution will receive all the changes and updates created in the upstream repository. Those changes simply “flow down” to the member’s solution. However, if a member organization forks the code — if they create a solution that strays from the main stream — their solution no longer receives updates, fixes and changes from the upstream repository. This organization is now solely responsible for maintaining their solution without the benefit of the upstream community, much like the baby salmon that took a tributary and then have to fend for themselves rather than remain in the main stream and receive the benefit and guidance of the other salmon making their way to the ocean.
  • HPE and Red Hat Join Forces to Give Customers Greater Choice for NFV Deployments
    Hewlett Packard Enterprise ( NYSE : HPE ) and Red Hat, Inc. ( NYSE : RHT ) announced today they are working together to accelerate the deployment of network functions virtualization (NFV) solutions based on fully open, production-ready, standards-based infrastructures. HPE plans to offer ready-to-use, pre-integrated HPE NFV System solutions and HPE Validated Configurations incorporating Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat Ceph Storage for communications service providers (CSPs).
  • Red Hat Joins the OpenPower Foundation
    As part of our commitment to delivering open technologies across many computing architectures, Red Hat has joined the OpenPOWER Foundation, an open development community based on the POWER microprocessor architecture, at the Platinum level. While we already do build and support open technologies for the POWER architecture, the OpenPOWER Foundation is committed to an open, community-driven technology-creation process – something that we feel is critical to the continued growth of open collaboration around POWER.
  • Buy, Sell or Hold? Analysts Approach: HCA Holdings, Inc. (HCA), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)?

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