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Friday, 01 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux kernel 3.6 released srlinuxx 01/10/2012 - 6:16pm
Story Debian Project News - October 1st srlinuxx 01/10/2012 - 6:13pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 01/10/2012 - 12:55am
Story To understand the command line... srlinuxx 01/10/2012 - 12:51am
Story In search of the best Linux distro of 2012: My Experiments srlinuxx 01/10/2012 - 12:50am
Story The Kernel Column with Jon Masters srlinuxx 01/10/2012 - 12:48am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 30/09/2012 - 5:23am
Story Updated Debian 6.0: 6.0.6 released srlinuxx 30/09/2012 - 1:31am
Story Ubuntu 12.10 Beta 2 Screenshots srlinuxx 30/09/2012 - 1:30am
Story Eric Hameleers: Slackware 14 released srlinuxx 30/09/2012 - 1:28am

Ubuntu Based Linux, 32 Flavours and Then Some…

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntulinuxhelp.com: I had an inspiring thought this morning. It occurred to me how vibrant a number of Ubuntu Linux flavours there must be. Below is what some of the flavours have to say about themselves. Ubuntu Linux truly is 32 flavours and then some. Can I make it to 32? I’m not sure but let’s try… Wink

Web Servers: Don't Count Apache Out

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: There's been discussion in the open source world about a decline in the popularity of the dominant Apache web server. These concerned are fueled largely by the Netcraft survey of the internet, which shows a 20% decline in Apache's market share over the last three years. But bearing in mind the old saw about lies and statistics, it's worth digging a bit more to see what these numbers mean.

10 Linux Commands You Probably Don’t Use

Filed under
Linux

foogazi.com: If you are a hard core systems administrator or Linux engineer you’ll probably recognize most of these Linux command line tricks. The following Linux command line tips are not typically used by your everyday Linux user.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Reload the Gnome or KDE Panels Without Restarting

  • How do I… Create a 3D logo in GIMP?
  • Drupal 6.0: Installation and Basic Usage
  • PIC Programming with Linux #2: building the programmer
  • dvorak to QWERTY on the fly
  • See what Unicode characters are in Perl’s character classes
  • Linux Desktop Search
  • The value of a meaningful xorg.conf
  • Bash bits, nibbles and bytes: Breaking out of the Loop.
  • Lightweight Linux - A Look at Fbpanel
  • Enhance your music player with Rockbox

mozilla developer news March 18

Filed under
Moz/FF

In this issue… Firefox 3 Memory usage, Mozilla QA Companion released, Mozilla at SXSW
John Lilly and Mike Schroepfer interviewed by Matt Asay, Effortless Good Firefox Add-on, and The Year of the Gecko.

Microsoft +/vs. Novell: The rich irony of then and now

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

Matt Asay: There is a tragic (but rich) irony in the news that Microsoft failed in its appeal to throw out Novell's decade-old antitrust lawsuit against it. On one hand, you have Novell arguing (rightly) in court that Microsoft unfairly bullies competitors. On the other hand, we see Novell supping at the feet of Microsoft to revive its Linux business.

When Lintel beats Wintel

Filed under
OS

Paul Murphy: "How is it possible for Linux ever to be substantially less expensive than Windows?” If you’re not dumb enough to pay someone like Red Hat to impose a license on you, Linux really is free - meaning that it’s always possible to get Linux for less than Windows.

Ubuntu and Marketing

Filed under
Ubuntu

jonreagan.wordpress: According to this blog post, Linux companies should do more to market their distribution. Here’s what is being done on the Ubuntu side, and some of the reasons why Linux companies do not run a full marketing campaign:

There’s Something About Pardus

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Pardus is a Turkish Linux distribution which can be installed and used more easily than the existing distros as well as other competitive operating systems. I've heard plenty of good things about Pardus that I gave it a try the other week. I tested Pardus 2007.3 in VMWare Server.

Lesser-known Gnome Panel Applets can improve your desktop

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The Gnome Desktop Environment comes with a set of default panel applets included. A little searching in your distribution´s repositories and on the Internet will uncover a few extra applets which are not included in the official Gnome offering, but which you may find very useful all the same. Let's take a brief look at some of them.

Why I switched back to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

theunixgeek.blogspot: Ubuntu is sometimes thought of as the beginner's distro, something that more advanced users don't care about. Of all the distros I've tried, Ubuntu is the fastest, most reliable, and (most of the time) most compatible.

GNOME Do 0.4 Released

Filed under
Software

blog.davebsd: The Do team is proud to announce the release of GNOME Do 0.4, our shiniest, smartest, and friendliest version yet.

5 ways to pimp your terminal in linux

Filed under
Software

tuxtraining.com: Most people tend to think of the terminal as boring. But here I will list a number of choices you can pick to snaz it up a bit. The following applications can increase the usability and the speed in which you use a terminal, from drop down screens, syntax highlighting, or having multiple terminals in one window.

Goodbye For Good Gentoo

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.diginux.net: It has been actually over a year since my “Goodbye Gentoo” post. I have been wanting to get away from Gentoo for a long time now because of how the Gentoo community has fallen apart. It was bad a year ago, and it has become only worse. The number of developers that left Gentoo is astounding.

Your $100 desktop PC

Filed under
Hardware

theinquirer.net: YOU’VE HEARD OF UMPC, MID, OLPC, DTR, subnotebooks, slim line PCs, ITX, SFF and basically enough variants on the age-old beige box to drown a fish. Well, if you haven’t heard already, La Intella has come up with yet another name for another format (or package): a Nettop. Half desktop, half UMPC.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux Adventures: Laptop Diary Part VIII

  • Know your System Administrator
  • year of the Gecko
  • AMD Radeon HD3870/HD3870 X2 Video Technology Considerations
  • OLPC Here and Now
  • 2.6.25-rc6, "Starting To Look Better"
  • LimeJeOS: The openSUSE based JeOS
  • Gasp! Google Revives Clippy?
  • Acquia ties success to growth of Drupal
  • OCZ Neural Impulse Actuator On Linux?
  • How to be a Successful Gentoo User

Will the "real" Linux, please step forward

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: When it comes to standardizations which is something the Linux development community is attempting to work on, how much of the standardization is really dependent on definition?

Linux Not Ready For the Masses...BULL

Filed under
Linux

riplinton.blogspot: I am tired of hearing and reading that Gnu/Linux is not ready for the "regular" or "normal" user. Self proclaimed experts and pundits insist that these users can not, or will not, use Gnu/Linux. They give all kinds of reasons for this. I say that most of these reasons exist only in the minds of these experts and pundits.

HP to sell Linux laptops and PCs

Filed under
SUSE

computerworld.com.au: HP is planning to introduce desktop and laptop computers that come with Novell's Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop operating system preinstalled.

more oss headlines:

Filed under
OSS
  • Redefining open source

  • The Saga of Open Source in Government
  • Will the GPL be overtaken by AGPL?
  • Is Consulting the Business Model for Free Software?
  • Fedora 9 to remove pointers to proprietary codecs
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Google and GitHub are Opening a New Window on Open Source
    Where can you find millions of open source code repositories? That would be on GitHub, of course, and with all those code repositories, one would think that analyzing them would lead to some interesting conclusions about open source in general, correct? That's the thinking behind a new offering from GitHub in partnership with Google. The two have produced a new open dataset on Google BigQuery, a low cost analytics data warehouse service in the cloud, so that anyone can get data-driven insights based on more than 2.8 million open source GitHub repositories. The move brings new data analytics capabilities to BigQuery.
  • Open Source Gospel From Cisco’s Lauren Clooney
    Companies that traditionally focused on proprietary software are now playing catch up in order to compete by utilizing open source development.
  • My condolences, you’re now the maintainer of a popular open source project
    Marc Andreessen, creator of the Netscape web browser, famously said "software is eating the world." I’d like to posit that it’s actually open source software that’s eating the world, and I have a couple of data points to back me up. First, a conclusion from the 2015 Future of Open Source survey: “Seventy-eight percent of respondents said their companies run part or all of its operations on OSS and 66 percent said their company creates software for customers built on open source. This statistic has nearly doubled since 2010.”
  • Tip: Try these open-source investigative journalism tools
    The Investigative Reporters and Editors conference took place in mid-June in New Orleans, and one of the sessions at the event looked at open-source tools for investigations. This 'Steal my tool' session highlighted a number of useful open-source investigative platforms, which Sam Berkhead, engagement editor at IJNet, listed in this article published after the conference.
  • DuckDuckGo: The Little Search Engine That Gives Back Big
    The company’s website says, “DuckDuckGo is a general purpose search engine that is intended to be your starting place when searching the Internet. Use it to get way more instant answers, way less spam and real privacy, which we believe adds up to a much better overall search experience.” [...] Proprietor Gabriel Weinberg says his once-personal project (founded in 2008) isn’t making anyone wealthy, but he and his workers live decently, and he says they’re doing well enough that giving money to open source projects doesn’t hurt their budget.
  • Understanding open source licenses
    Open source licenses are licenses that comply with the Open Source Definition — in brief, they allow software to be freely used, modified, and shared. To be approved by the Open Source Initiative (also known as the OSI), a license must go through the Open Source Initiative’s license review process. There has been an increase release of open source software from the day of Linux. Today most popular frame works like bootstrap and software such as Atom IDE used by developers are open source. We often never worry about using open source code but do you know what the license under which the frame you’re using was released means?
  • Build your own open source solar panels
    Do-it-yourself electricity generation is still difficult and expensive. The inventors of the SunZilla project aim to make it easier, cleaner, portable, quiet, and completely open source. The SunZilla system is designed to replace diesel and gasoline-powered generators for portable and emergency power: camping, events, mobile phone charging station, provide power to refugee camps, or keep the lights on during a power outage. Two people can set it up in a few minutes. It is modular and plug-and-play. Leonie Gildein is one of the five SunZilla engineers, and kindly answered some questions about the project.
  • Lessons From The Downfall Of A $150M Crowdfunded Experiment In Decentralized Governance
    Hype around blockchain has risen to an all-time high. A technology once perceived to be the realm of crypto-anarchists and drug dealers has gained increasing popular recognition for its revolutionary potential, drawing billions in venture-capital investment by the world's leading financial institutions and technology companies. Regulators, rather than treating blockchain platforms (such as Bitcoin or Ethereum) and other "distributed ledgers" merely as tools of illicit dark markets, are beginning to look at frameworks to regulate and incorporate this important technology into traditional commerce.
  • Openfunds launches global standard for fund data interchange
    The standard is published on the openfunds website and can be used by anyone free of charge.

Hadoop and Spark

Openwashing

Leftovers: Software

  • Pitivi 0.96 — Cogito Ergo Proxy
  • Pitivi 0.96 Released With Proxy Editing Support
    In addition to proxy editing, Pitivi 0.96 also has timeline changes, transformation box, setting changes, user interface improvements, the start of allowing custom keyboard shortcuts, and support for Flatpak packages.
  • Calamares 2.3 Universal Linux OS Installer Released with Full-Disk Encryption
    Today, June 30, 2016, the Calamares team was proud to announce the final release and immediate availability for download of the Calamares 2.3 distribution-independent system installer. Calamares is currently being used in numerous popular operating systems, including, but not limited to, KaOS, Apricity OS, Chakra GNU/Linux, Netrunner, Sabayon, and OpenMandriva. It is the universal installer framework that many GNU/Linux distributions should adopt as it's now one of the most advanced system installers.
  • etcd3: A new etcd
    Over the past few months, CoreOS has been diligently finalizing the etcd3 API beta, testing the system and working with users to make etcd even better. Today etcd v3.0.0, the distributed key value store developed by CoreOS, is available. In practice, etcd3 is already integrated into a large-scale distributed system, Kubernetes, and we have implemented distributed coordination primitives including distributed locks, elections, and software transactional memory, to ensure the etcd3 API is flexible enough to support a variety of applications. Today we’re proud to announce that etcd3 is ready for general use.
  • Zend Framework 3 Released!
    After 17 months of effort, hundreds of releases, tens of thousands of commits by hundreds of contributors, and millions of installs, we're pleased to announce the immediate availability of Zend Framework 3.
  • ANNOUNCE: virt-viewer 4.0 release
  • Virt-Manager's Virrt-Viewer 4.0 Released