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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story NVIDIA Maxwell GPU Support On Nouveau Still Requires More Work Rianne Schestowitz 14/09/2014 - 7:57pm
Story RadeonSI Gallium3D-Nine Can Beat AMD Catalyst With Some Wine Tests Rianne Schestowitz 14/09/2014 - 7:23pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2014 - 7:52am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2014 - 7:52am
Story "Evil" Linux Users Teach Mac OS X Fans How to Improve and Destroy Their System Rianne Schestowitz 14/09/2014 - 7:25am
Story Nouveau Lands A OpenGL 4.3 Feature & Fixes MPEG4 Video Decoding Rianne Schestowitz 14/09/2014 - 7:17am
Story On normal people using linux, part 3 Rianne Schestowitz 14/09/2014 - 7:08am
Story Be an entrepreneur with OpenSource, a talk for the II Forum of women and IT Rianne Schestowitz 14/09/2014 - 7:03am
Story Enjoy Five Gorgeous Linux Desktops from the Google+ Community Rianne Schestowitz 14/09/2014 - 6:59am
Story Wayland/Weston 1.6 RC2 Released Rianne Schestowitz 14/09/2014 - 6:54am

Second Wave of Netbooks Near Release

Filed under
Hardware

internetnews.com (reuters): A new class of cheaper, smaller netbook computers might upset the IT establishment this year. Without Windows or Intel chips, the new trend "puts the existing PC structure at risk."

Kaffeine 1.0 Pre-Release Preview - First KDE4 Port

Filed under
Reviews

Although this is a pre-alpha release, it looks just awesome, and if all the features (or at least almost all) will be implemented by the time 1.0 gets out as a stable release, Kaffeine will definitely keep being one of the most powerful video players for KDE.

Split APE and FLAC Files in Ubuntu and Add Tags by Cue File

Filed under
Ubuntu

Did you ever downloaded a single APE or FLAC file consisting of multiple songs? If so, it's quite annoying to try and listen to only one song. But you can split the files into multiple songs exactly like in the cue file (each song's start and end time are saved in the cue file, so we'll know where to cut the big file). Full article

How to decide whether desktop Linux makes sense

Filed under
Linux

infoworld.com: Eight questions to help you determine if now is the time to find a place for desktop Linux in your organization

Linux Mint 6 (Felicia) Review

Filed under
Linux

extremetech.com: Linux Mint seeks to take the ease-of-use provided by Ubuntu to a new level and, for the most part, succeeds. Linux Mint's slogan is "From freedom came elegance" and that's very appropriate for what this distribution is all about.

Ubuntu 9.04: Wow

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 9.04: Wow

  • Reflections on ten releases of Ubuntu
  • Whaddaya mean… sold out to Ubuntu Jaunty?!

Pros and Cons for Using CLI

Filed under
Reviews

In this article I will debate on several major advantages and disadvantages for using the command-line in Linux. When I think it's 'better' to use CLI, when not, and how can this can impact the work speed.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 300

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Xubuntu 9.04 vs Debian 5.0.1 Xfce

  • News: Ubuntu releases Jaunty, Debian Lenny gets free kernels, Fedora released re-spun images, openSUSE considers Git for its build service, interviews with Linus Torvalds and Mark Shuttleworth
  • Released last week: Ubuntu 9.04, SimplyMEPIS 8.0.06
  • Upcoming releases: Mandriva Linux 2009.1, OpenBSD 4.5
  • New distributions: Chaox, Lin-X, Super OS, TOSS
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Linus on Linux: Torvalds Interview Part 2

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

linux-mag.com: In part 2 of our interview, Linus talks about the process of managing kernel developer commits, selecting a revision control system and how he personally uses git.

Eight Reasons Your next Computer Should Run Linux

Filed under
Linux

tuxtweaks.com: Earlier today on PC World, Harry McCracken had a pair of articles titled “Eight Reasons Your Next Computer Should Be a PC” and “Eight Reasons Your Next Computer Should Be a Mac“. Well, since Harry didn’t complete the series, I’ll do it for him, so here we go.

Tech Break: It's Linux Time

Filed under
Linux

oredigger.net: While Apple and Microsoft are chugging away at a release of their operating systems every few years, a free competitor is growing more and more powerful, releasing a new edition every six months and capturing low-end markets like netbooks and cell phones.

Quick look at Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Quick look at Ubuntu 9.04

  • Ubuntu 9.04 64-bit with ext4
  • Kubuntu 9.04 Falls Short
  • Top Downloads For (X)ubuntu 9.04

5 Ways Xoopit Extends Gmail

Filed under
Software

I’m a huge fan of Gmail. I’ve been using it for years, and have converted several small businesses over to Google Apps so they can take advantage of it. I find it fast and flexible, and can get to my seven years worth of email from any computer on the planet.

For the last few weeks I’ve been extending Gmail’s functionality with a Firefox extension called “Xoopit for Gmail“. Xoopit makes Gmail more social, and gives flexible access to attachments others have sent me.

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Eric S. Raymond: The Economic Case Against the GPL

  • FLOSS Weekly 66: OLE Nepal
  • Linux Migration for the Home PC User, Part 8
  • Skype on The Dell Mini 9
  • Linux marketing #2 : Mandriva and Grid-computing
  • First Android netbook to cost about $250
  • Using the Shell
  • X.Org 7.5 Release Schedule Revised For July
  • Will Oracle kill MySQL? Who cares?
  • One Of The Many Reasons Inetd Isn't Around Any More

Gnash Developers and Linux Fund Raise Funds for OpenStreetMap Bounty

Filed under
Web

Linux Fund and OpenMediaNow have expanded their partnership with the Gnash media player development team to bring OpenStreetMap editing support to the open source Flash® player, Gnash.

Group test: project planners

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: If you were suffering in silence because you thought you couldn't draw a Gantt chart or an RBS diagram on Linux, you were wrong. In this article we'll present five project managers that are aimed at non-geek desktop users.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #139

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #139 for the week of April 19th- April 25th, 2009 is now available.

SimplyMEPIS 8.0.06 Update is Available

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: MEPIS LLC has released SimplyMEPIS 8.0.06, an update to the community edition of MEPIS 8.0. The updated components on the SimplyMEPIS ISOs include recent updates from the Debian Lenny pool and also Linux kernel 2.6.27.21, Firefox 3.0.9, jbidwatcher 2.0.1, and gutenprint 5.2.3.

10 Expert Ubuntu Tricks

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • 10 Expert Ubuntu Tricks

  • Migrating to ext4
  • Tweet From Ubuntu 9.04 Terminal
  • What should become of Edubuntu?
  • Vista Fonts in Ubuntu
  • Logitech Webcam & Skype under Ubuntu

Mepis 8

Filed under
Linux

muskratsweb.net: I just recently downloaded and installed Mepis again. I’ll have to say, it has really improved from previous installs I’ve tried. Before it was based on Ubuntu and had the blot inherited from such a blotted upstream distro.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming