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Friday, 25 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

First Impressions: Ubuntu 10.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

besttechie.net: If you’re a Linux user like myself – or even a potential Linux user – chances are you’re eagerly awaiting the release of Ubuntu 10.10. Today I decided to give the beta version of Ubuntu 10.10 a test-drive using a virtual machine, and I have to say, I’m not all that impressed.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Java sitting at kids table at Oracle conference
  • Gentoo Hardened [Mostly] Ready for Servers
  • IA32 System Call Entry Point Vulnerability
  • Stripes: Arch
  • Microsoft reported to side with Oracle – Not really shocking?
  • Ubuntu Software Centre has great potential
  • Quake Live Premium Event
  • Jury Vindicates Former Linspire Employees of 3-Years of Robertson Attacks
  • How to deal with exploding codebases?
  • Wanna Help Make the Dot Better
  • The Linux Action Show! s13e08 | Epic Linux News

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Change Nautilus opening every folder in a new window
  • See what images are being viewed on your network with driftnet
  • Splitting and Merging multiple files
  • setup Secure HTTP (SSL) on Apache in Ubuntu
  • SASL : IMAP authentication system
  • Pipes – Getting the most out of your shell
  • How to use the most popular command in Unix – Grep
  • Maintain a history of your copy/paste entries using Glipper
  • Disk partitioning guide for Linux Mint Debian
  • How to Fake a Tilt-Shift Miniature Photograph in GIMP
  • Google’s Picasa 3 on Linux
  • Gamgi is a program to build, view, and analyze atomic strucures

Uncle Sam meets open source with open arms

Filed under
OSS

networkworld.com: It seems everywhere I look, I see another example of government adopting open source.

Software And Other Legacy Of The Baby Boomer Generation

Filed under
OSS

keithcu.com: Free versus proprietary software is similar to the divide between science and alchemy. We can blame the baby boomers for making proprietary software the dominant model. Linus Torvalds is a Generation X-er.

Amnesia Release Analysis

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

linuxgames.com: The response we got from the game is a lot better than we expected, yet the sales are only “good” according to our, much more modest, expected response. Linux purchases have run at about 5% of total sales, on par with the Mac edition.

Firefox, Free my memory

Filed under
Moz/FF

jeff.ecchi.ca/blog: My fellow Antistress argued that I should be going back from Chromium to Firefox today. I replied, “Only when it starts up in less than 3 seconds and frees my memory when closing tabs”.

Gnash needs more support

Filed under
Software

whilos.blogsite.org: I’ve just tested Gnash 0.8.8 in a recent firefox beta and it works very well with youtube here. Other famous video (e.g. vimeo) sites, checked some pr0n sites as well, don’t work (properly) though.

“Sent using Ubuntu” default in Ubuntu Evolution

Filed under
Ubuntu

lucidfox.org: A “bug” was filed asking to add a “Sent using Ubuntu” signature by default to Evolution. How did this happen and who decided it was a bug? Judging by the way it was so quickly responded to, it seems like a decision made in Canonical behind closed doors and filed on Launchpad as a mere formality.

The wonders of Digikam

Filed under
Software

cristalinux.blogspot: Originally started by photographers who wanted to "view, manage, edit, enhance, organize, tag, and share photographs under Linux systems", the Digikam project has come a long way.

Pixlr Grabber, Firefox Screenshot Taking Add-On

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF

ghacks.net: The free Firefox add-on Pixel Grabber makes it dead easy to take screenshots in the browser. How does it work? Simply right-click on a page, or click on the status bar icon to grab a screenshot of the whole page, custom or visible area.

Setting Up An NFS Server And Client On OpenSUSE 11.3

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

This guide explains how to set up an NFS server and an NFS client on OpenSUSE 11.3. NFS stands for Network File System; through NFS, a client can access (read, write) a remote share on an NFS server as if it was on the local hard disk.

5 Reasons Debian One of the Most Popular Distros

Filed under
Linux

tuxarena.blogspot: Debian is one of the oldest and most popular distributions among the Linux users. There are probably hundreds of distributions which are based on Debian. So, let's proceed and see what makes Debian so popular and loved among the Linux users.

GNOME 2.32 Release Candidate Makes It Out

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: The release candidate for GNOME 2.32 is now available after it was delayed a few days due to technical problems.

Firefox 4 now with optimized session restore

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: If you tend to have a large number of tabs open at a time, get ready to experiment considerably faster session restores thanks to cascaded session restore (CSR), an optimized approach that loads a limited number of tabs at a time (3 by default) when Firefox restarts.

Linux Journal be Taken Over by Pirates, ARRRR!

Filed under
Humor

linuxjournal.com: I regret t' inform ye that we've been boarded by a ban' o' filthy pirates while sailin' th' high seas. What? Isn't that what ye do on weekends?

shuttleworth video interview excerpt

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Mark Shuttleworth on Ubuntu and Dell Tie Up
  • Edubuntu 10.10 Installer is Also Getting a Full Overhaul

Linux Out Performs Windows in OpenGL

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Late last year I did a posting detailing how Windows 7 crushed Ubuntu 9.10 in the area of 3D performance. Nine months later I am happy to say:

KDocker: Dock Any Application in the System Tray

Filed under
Software

tuxarena.blogspot: I bet at one point or another you felt you missed the system tray integration feature in some application, be it xterm, an audio player, a file manager or any other program. Well, KDocker is just the thing.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: VPNFilter, Encryption in GNU/Linux, Intel CPU Bug Affecting rr Watchpoints

  • [Crackers] infect 500,000 consumer routers all over the world with malware

    VPNFilter—as the modular, multi-stage malware has been dubbed—works on consumer-grade routers made by Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear, TP-Link, and on network-attached storage devices from QNAP, Cisco researchers said in an advisory. It’s one of the few pieces of Internet-of-things malware that can survive a reboot. Infections in at least 54 countries have been slowly building since at least 2016, and Cisco researchers have been monitoring them for several months. The attacks drastically ramped up during the past three weeks, including two major assaults on devices located in Ukraine. The spike, combined with the advanced capabilities of the malware, prompted Cisco to release Wednesday’s report before the research is completed.

  • Do Not Use sha256crypt / sha512crypt - They're Dangerous

    I'd like to demonstrate why I think using sha256crypt or sha512crypt on current GNU/Linux operating systems is dangerous, and why I think the developers of GLIBC should move to scrypt or Argon2, or at least bcrypt or PBKDF2.

  • Intel CPU Bug Affecting rr Watchpoints
    I investigated an rr bug report and discovered an annoying Intel CPU bug that affects rr replay using data watchpoints. It doesn't seem to be hit very often in practice, which is good because I don't know any way to work around it. It turns out that the bug is probably covered by an existing Intel erratum for Skylake and Kaby Lake (and probably later generations, but I'm not sure), which I even blogged about previously! However, the erratum does not mention watchpoints and the bug I've found definitely depends on data watchpoints being set. I was able to write a stand-alone testcase to characterize the bug. The issue seems to be that if a rep stos (and probably rep movs) instruction writes between 1 and 64 bytes (inclusive), and you have a read or write watchpoint in the range [64, 128) bytes from the start of the writes (i.e., not triggered by the instruction), then one spurious retired conditional branch is (usually) counted. The alignment of the writes does not matter, and it's not related to speculative execution.

In Memoriam: Robin "Roblimo" Miller, a Videographer and Free Software Champion

Videographer Robin Roblimo Miller

Robin "Roblimo" Miller was a clever, friendly, and very amicable individual who everyone I know has plenty of positive things to say about. I had the pleasure of speaking to him for several hours about anything from personal life and professional views. Miller was a very knowledgeable person whose trade as a journalist and video producer I often envied. I have seen him facing his critics in his capacity as a journalist over a decade ago when he arranged a debate about OOXML (on live radio). Miller, to me, will always be remembered as a strong-minded and investigative journalist who "did the right thing" as the cliché goes, irrespective of financial gain -- something which can sometimes be detrimental to one's longterm health. Miller sacrificed many of his later years to a cause worth fighting for. This is what we ought to remember him for. Miller was - and always will be - a FOSS hero.

May everything you fought for be fulfilled, Mr. Miller. I already miss you.

Today in Techrights

Tux Machines Privacy Statement

Summary: Today, May 25th, the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into full effect; we hereby make a statement on privacy AS a matter of strict principle, this site never has and never will accumulate data on visitors (e.g. access logs) for longer than 28 days. The servers are configured to permanently delete all access data after this period of time. No 'offline' copies are being made. Temporary logging is only required in case of DDOS attacks and cracking attempts -- the sole purpose of such access. Additionally, we never have and never will sell any data pertaining to anything. We never received demands for such data from authorities; even if we had, we would openly declare this (publicly, a la Canary) and decline to comply. Privacy is extremely important to us, which is why pages contain little or no cross-site channels (such as Google Analytics, 'interactive' buttons for 'social' media etc.) and won't be adding any. Google may be able to 'see' what pages people visit because of Google Translate (top left of every page), but that is not much worse than one's ISP 'seeing' the same thing. We are aware of this caveat. Shall readers have any further questions on such matters, do not hesitate to contact us.