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Friday, 24 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Advocates in the Wild Rianne Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 9:50pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 9:32pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 9:04pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 9:03pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 9:02pm
Story VolksPC wants to crowdfund an Android/Debian Linux PC Roy Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 8:49pm
Story Is the cloudbook the future of Linux? Rianne Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 12:37pm
Story Microsoft files Android patent-royalty suit against Samsung Rianne Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 12:35pm
Story GNU Spotlight with Karl Berry: 18 new GNU releases! Rianne Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 12:29pm
Story Ottawa Linux Symposium needs your help Rianne Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 12:16pm

Amarok vs Songbird

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Most migrants from other operating systems will seek out a Linux alternative to the ubiquitous iTunes, and chances are they'll come across Amarok 2.0 and Songbird 1.0. Which one is right for you?

Linux : the cool factor - part 2

Filed under
Linux

handlewithlinux.com: Last time I mentioned compiz, which gave very different responses. Some people think it's great others hate it. Today I'll throw in something completely different.

Top Five Geek-Style Distros

Filed under
Linux

extremetech.com: Here are a list of some of the distros that really appeal to the geeks, though they are not LIMITED to geek use:

Review: The Hauppauge HD-PVR

Filed under
Hardware

raiden.net: Hauppauge's HD-PVR is a video/audio capture device that samples "YPrPb" component video at HD resolutions. HD-PVR has attracted a lot of attention since it is able to bypass all digitial content controls and take advantage of the "analog hole", while doing so at a very affordable price.

What you really should know about Linux

Filed under
Linux

themysticbird.com: A lot of folks have heard of Linux and many more have even been interested enough to check it out. Thing is, a lot of what is spread around the ‘net about Linux unfortunately is giving people the wrong impression. Let me help dispel the rumours.

Microsoft Should Take a Cue from Red Hat in Desktop Virtualization

Filed under
Software

eweek.com: Microsoft's dismissive attitude of VDI, or virtual desktop infrastructure, calls to mind Red Hat's stance toward the desktop as a viable Linux commercial offering. With its recent desktop virtualization agreement with Microsoft and other work it's done, Red Hat may soon be offering VDI capabilities.

More Linux tips every geek should know

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

tuxradar.com: We asked our followers on Identi.ca and Twitter what kind of articles they wanted us to put up. KeithWatson1 responded with "I would love to see desktop tip articles", so here goes:

Free 3D Video Drivers needed to spread the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Software

gnuski.blogspot: Desktop use of GNU/Linux is on the rise, and one of the factors leading people towards its use is videos such as these, showing off the newest effects. However, to get these effects on a KDE or Gnome desktop, you must* use a 3D-accelerating hardware driver for your video card.

Google CEO hints Google/Linux netbooks may be coming

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.computerworld: On March 3rd, though, Google CEO Eric Schmidt said, What's particularly interesting about netbooks is the price point. Eventually, it will make sense for operators and so forth to subsidize the use of netbooks so they can make services revenue and advertising revenue on the consumption. That's another new model that's coming."

OpenOffice extensions - When good gets better

Filed under
Software
OOo

dedoimedo.com: Firefox has extensions - and so does OpenOffice. OpenOffice extensions allow you to ... extend the basic functionality of the software and make it more suited to your needs, better looking and more productive.

World of Goo

Filed under
Gaming

tuxradar.com: Two whizz-kid programmers exit EA, decide to create a game to enter the Independent Games Festival, snatch awards for design innovation and technical excellence, and Linux gets a cracking new game as a result.

EXT4 is improving the Linux experience

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: It’s a universal truth that all PCs are slow. All of them, no matter the hardware, no matter the OS, they’re slow. The faster it goes, the faster we want it to go. It’s never enough.

Handy binary packages

Filed under
OSS

polishlinux.org: On distribution of Linux programs. In response to the painful article, I’d like to touch the topic of a handy and easy way to install programs under Linux.

Free/Open Source Workout/Fitness Software for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: Since I have a healthy goal for 2009, I’ve been looking for a program that can help me accomplish my objective. I found several workout/fitness desktop applications for my Linux box, but very few have satisfied my needs.

If you blog, Shutter will rock your socks

Filed under
Software

stefanoforenza.com: Yesterday night, I’ve been contacted on IRC by Vadim. Turned out he was in the development team of Shutter and told me to take a look to the new release (0.7).

Putting Open Source to the Mom Test

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux-magazine.com: I stumbled across Amber's blog by accident today – she's writing a series of posts that document her experience installing and using Linux distros and a variety of open source applications.

So you want to run windows programs on Linux?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: It seems to be a big sticking point for windows users that they can't run their windows programs on Linux. They say they would use Linux if only they could run such and such windows program. Sounds to me like they wish to have their cake and eat it too.

Testing Fedora 11 Alpha on the HP tx2000z Tablet PC..

Filed under
Linux

securemind.org: In my anxious haste I’ve decided to try out Fedora 11 Alpha on my Tablet PC… I don’t expect many things work correctly but I figured it was worth trying out. To start with my tablet has a AMD Turion x2 64 so I downloaded this live cd torrent. My overall experience was as follows:

Mandriva 2009.0: Much improved since last year

Filed under
MDV

izanbardprince.wordpress: After having gone over 2009.0, both Free (on my desktop) and One (on my laptop), I feel that Mandriva 2009 is much improved, I’ll go over some talking points here.

Taking Ubuntu 9.04 Out For A Spin

Filed under
Ubuntu

itnewstoday.com: Earlier this week, I previewed Kubuntu 9.04, so I thought it would be a logical next step to preview Ubuntu 9.04 as well.

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More in Tux Machines

San Francisco Open Source Voting System Project Continues On

At the February 15 Elections Commission meeting, the Elections Commission voted unanimously to ask the Mayor's Office to allocate $4 million towards initial development of the open source voting project for the 2018-19 fiscal year (from Aug. 2018 - July 2019). This would go towards initial development once the planning phase is complete. Read more

Detailed change log for deepin 15.4 RC

deepin is a Linux distribution devoted to providing beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users. After public test of deepin 15.4 Beta, we have received a lot of suggestions and feedback, we adopted part of them and fixed a lot of problems. Read more

GNOME 3.24: New Linux desktop is fast, responsive

I’ve been a fan of the work of the GNOME team for quite some time. They put together one heck of an excellent Linux desktop environment. But of late, I’ve found myself gravitating towards some of the more lightweight environments. MATE (which is a forked version of GNOME 2) and xmonad. I like my systems to be light on resource usage and highly responsive—those are two absolutely critical things for the way I use my computers. With this week’s release of GNOME 3.24, I decided to jump back into the world of modern GNOME desktops and kick the tires again. In order to give it the best possible shot, I did a clean install of openSUSE Tumbleweed (the rolling release version of openSUSE) and then installed GNOME 3.24 on top of it. (Side note: 3.24 was not yet available in the default repositories when I wrote this article, but it should be shortly.) Read more Also: Applying to Outreachy and GSoC for Fedora and GNOME

OpenSuse Leap Reinforces Linux Faith

Leap is a solid performer. I had no trouble installing it on MBR and EFI systems. Secure Boot tends to be buggy with some configurations, but it was incident-free with this installation. The bootloader handles multiboot with other Linux distributions or Windows fairly trouble-free. Installation is routine, thanks to the graphical format used. Only 64-bit versions are available for x86 computers, which limits access to legacy hardware in the 32-bit machines. ARM ports are available if you can track them down through the project's wiki. Read more