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Monday, 30 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Fedora 9 Alpha Preview

Filed under
Linux

phoronix: On this Super Tuesday here in the United States, Red Hat has this morning released the first and only alpha release for Fedora 9. This ninth Fedora release, which has been codenamed Sulphur, will ship in April and go head-to-head against Ubuntu 8.04 LTS "Hardy Heron", but what features can one expect in this forthcoming release?

KDE Quickies: KDE 4.0.1, openSUSE Live CD, New KDE Repository Layout

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

news.opensuse.org: Just in time for the KDE 4.0.1 release, the openSUSE KDE team has updated the KDE 4 packages in the Build Service to the KDE 4.0.1 state, featuring several improvements over the plain KDE 4.0.1 release and including further integration fixes.

A Linux Valentine - Oh Linux, how do I love thee?

Filed under
Linux
Humor

linuxhow2.com: Way number 1: You breathe new life into old hardware. They should age PCs in dog years. Here's a trusted dog year calendar that helped me better determine the age of my Laptop. My three-year old laptop is going on 25 dog years now, and Windows is like the Army, and 25 year old recruits are starting to get too old to put on the front lines.

Elive distro illustrates power, beauty of Enlightenment

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: The Elive Linux distribution combines beauty with ease of use. Elive is based on Debian and uses Enlightenment as its windows manager, which gives the distribution a Mac OS X look and feel. Elive comes with dozens of easy-to-use desktop applications that just work.

Red Hat 11th fastest growing company in America

Filed under
Linux

linuxhelp.blogspot: Forbes magazine recently compiled a list of the top 25 fastest growing companies in America. And guess what, Red Hat is placed 11th in the list.

Free/Open-source Digital Audio Editors

Filed under
Software

junauza.blogspot: A digital audio editor is a computer application for audio editing or digital audio manipulation. I have here a list of well-known free/open-source digital audio editors for the music enthusiasts, professionals and non-professionals alike.

Will OpenOffice.org 3.0 be better?

Filed under
OOo

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Following on from my piece on whether OpenOffice.org can do the job I have remembered that OpenOffice.org 3.0 is due for release in September. So—with my comments on 2.3 in mind—let’s see whether the new version will address my needs.

Open-Source Creative X-Fi Support

Filed under
Software

phoronix: Last Friday 4Front Technologies had released the binaries and source-code to OSS 4.0 Build 1013. This new build of the Open Sound System brings two major changes, which include the full source code now being available for the M-Audio Revolution and Delta sound card drivers, and a beta driver for the Sound Blast X-Fi series from Creative Labs.

Q and A with Linus Torvalds

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

smh.com.au: At last week's linux.conf.au gathering in Melbourne, Nick Miller talked to Linux creator Linus Torvalds about his work and ambitions for his operating system.

Also: Photos: Linux.conf.au 2008

Your Portage tree just got 200MB smaller

Filed under
Gentoo

gentoo.org/news: Each ebuild in the Portage tree used to come with its own digest file. When you emerged a package, this digest was used to verify that you had the same files the developer did. Until now.

Just Installed PCLinuxOS for my folks

Filed under
PCLOS

gresak.com: This past weekend, I used one of our old desktop computers to install a copy of PCLinuxOS 2007. I took this updated system over to my parents house for them to try out as an alternative to their aging Windows XP system.

Why even use Linux??

Filed under
Linux

linuxloader.com: Why do I use Linux? I get that question quite a bit. Depending on who I'm talking to my response varies. Some of the more technical reasons leave many users with a blank stare. If you're reading this I assume you are either already running Linux or are about too. Well...... why are you doing it? Lets take a look at some of the reasons.

OpenSUSE's new tech evangelist spells it out

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

computerworlduk.com: Novell has joined the trend in appointing a community manager for its SUSE Linux distribution. Joe "Zonker" Brockmeier spells out what it is all about.

Village School Director Backs Linux

Filed under
Linux

kommersant.com: Alexander Ponosov, director of the school in the village of Sepych, Perm Territory, who has found guilty of installing pirated Windows software in 12 school computers, has changed jobs. He is now engaged in popularizing the free Linux operating system.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How to get a Quake-like terminal session in Ubuntu by tapping the ‘~’ key

  • How to Deploy Linux From the Data Center to the Desktop
  • 2008 will be the year of the open source CMS
  • There is no Year of the Linux Desktop
  • Microsoft says to borrow money for Yahoo deal
  • Cursor behavior in OOo Calc
  • Apache sees modest market share gain
  • Google's Android Hits a Few Snags, But Feature Details Emerge
  • Is NVIDIA Buying AGEIA Good For Linux?
  • Keeping your system clock synchronized
  • Short Tip: Create a patch and use it in rpm
  • U CAN HAS LOLcats on Linux with Ruby and GTK
  • Linux on mainframes made easy
  • MySQL root password recovery under linux
  • BackupPC 3.1.0 for Ubuntu
  • DRI2 Comes Closer To Its Debut
  • The Rock-n-Roll DOSBox Freak Show

Eventually all of the [US] Army's networks will be Linux-based

Filed under
Linux

Matt Asay: The goal of the US Army is to move from Windows to Linux. In the meantime, the Army has to find ways to make the two work together. It's turning to Red Hat to do so and to a group of internal IT professionals to create a "Battle Command" that will explore how to move the Army from 20th-century Windows to 21st-century Linux.

Know your code, know open source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: It used to be there were only a couple of players in town who combed through software code, specifically looking for open source packages and licenses: Black Duck and Palamida. A year ago, we figured there was plenty of room for additional players, but we had no idea how many companies would end up coming to the open source code scanning table.

Yahoo's Openness Asset

linuxjournal.com: What if Yahoo's main value isn't its search engine or its advertising business, but the openness that makes it more Net-native and hacker-friendly than Microsoft?

Chyrp: A lightweight tool for simple blogging

Filed under
Software

linux.com: High-end open source blogging applications may have all the features you can think of, but you may not need all that. For simple blogs, a lightweight alternative like Chyrp is worth a closer look.

GNU/something

Filed under
OS

polishlinux.org: Let me ask you a basic question: Which operating system do you use? What are the possible answers? Windows, Linux, Solaris or Mac OS X of course. But let us try to think different for a moment. Maybe it is possible, that this answer would be it is Nexenta GNU/OpenSolaris.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • 6 Excellent Console Linux File Managers
    A console application is computer software which can be used with a text-only computer interface, the command line interface, or a text-based interface included within a graphical user interface operating system, such as a terminal emulator (such as GNOME Terminal or the aforementioned Terminator). Whereas a graphical user interface application generally involves using the mouse and keyboard (or touch control), with a console application the primary (and often only) input method is the keyboard. Many console applications are command line tools, but there is a wealth of software that has a text-based user interface making use of ncurses, a library which allow programmers to write text-based user interfaces.
  • PHP Tour 2016 Clermont-Ferrand
  • Enlightenment's EFL Getting New DRM Library
    Chris Michael of Samsung has been working on a new DRM library for the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) with a number of improvements. The initial implementation of this new library, Ecore_Drm2, has been added to EFL Git.
  • Antergos 2016.05.28 Screenshot Tour
  • Gentoo Linux 20160514 Screenshot Tour
  • First coding week with openSUSE, Google Summer of Code
    Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Martin Garcia Monterde. Martin detailed his first week coding with openSUSE and the Google Summer of Code.
  • OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid
    I have updated the openpht repository with builds of OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid for both amd64 and i386 architecture. For those who have forgotten it, OpenPHT is the open source fork of Plex Home Theater that is used on RasPlex, see my last post concerning OpenPHT for details.
  • vcswatch is now looking for tags
    About a week ago, I extended vcswatch to also look at tags in git repositories. Previously, it was solely paying attention to the version number in the top paragraph in debian/changelog, and would alert if that version didn't match the package version in Debian unstable or experimental. The idea is that "UNRELEASED" versions will keep nagging the maintainer (via DDPO) not to forget that some day this package needs an upload. This works for git, svn, bzr, hg, cvs, mtn, and darcs repositories (in decreasing order of actual usage numbers in Debian. I had actually tried to add arch support as well, but that VCS is so weird that it wasn't worth the trouble).

Google and Oracle

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers (Parrot Security OS 3.0 “Lithium”, Regulation)

  • Parrot Security OS 3.0 “Lithium” — Best Kali Linux Alternative Coming With New Features
    The Release Candidate of Parrot Security OS 3.0 ‘Lithium’ is now available for download. The much-anticipated final release will come in six different editions with the addition of Libre, LXDE, and Studio editions. The version 3.0 of this Kali Linux alternative is based on Debian Jessie and powered by custom hardened Linux 4.5 kernel.
  • Regulation can fix security, except you can't regulate security
    Every time I start a discussion about how we can solve some of our security problems it seems like the topics of professional organizations and regulation are where things end up. I think regulations and professional organizations can fix a lot of problems in an industry, I'm not sure they work for security. First let's talk about why regulation usually works, then, why it won't work for security.