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Monday, 27 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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When the Linux missionaries come a-callin

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: No one is a bigger fan of Linux more than I. I am sold on it lock, stock and barrel. However, There is liking Linux, encouraging people to try Linux and then there are the Linux missionaries for whom Linux has become a religion.

Freedom vs. Control

Filed under
OSS

mr-oss.com: The lack of Linux tools which can modify enterprise wide linux deployments is helping to slow it's adoption. Linux philosophy is based around freedom from the control. The control is in the hands of the user and the enterprise administer is left out in the cold.

U.S. Schools: Not Ready For Linux

Filed under
Linux

beginlinux.wordpress: US schools are not yet ready for Linux. Yes sad to say, it is not because they can’t do Linux or don’t need a feasible, safe and renewable source for technology. US schools are not ready to accept Linux because they don’t feel the need.

How to run a successful Linux User Group

Filed under
Linux

techradar.com: If there was one thing Linux Format magazine learned from the Readers' Round Table event it organised, it was that us Linux folk like to get out and have a good chat.

How To Run Fully-Virtualized Guests (HVM) With Xen 3.2 On Debian Lenny (x86_64)

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can set up fully-virtualized guests (HVM) with Xen 3.2 on a Debian Lenny x86_64 host system. HVM stands for HardwareVirtualMachine; to set up such guests, you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization (Intel VT or AMD-V).

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Fedora 11 preview

  • Become a Linux command line black-belt
  • FLOSS Weekly 59: TuxPaint
  • 5 Minutes of World of Goo
  • PAM hell starts to freeze
  • Bandits: Phoenix Rising Finally Gets A New Beta
  • What the *, Firefox?
  • Drupalcon: Drupal Adds Install Tools, Support
  • Tykes Need Linux Too
  • NVIDIA Releases 180.37 Linux Display Driver

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu Tweak 0.4.6

  • Analyzing boot performance of OpenSuse 11.1 with bootchart
  • How to Tunnel Web Traffic with SSH Secure Shell
  • Howto Setup Wireless on a Fujitsu Siemens Li 2727 notebook
  • Debian Lenny Minimal Desktop
  • How to use a WiFi interface
  • Debugging Wifi on Ubuntu Linux
  • Ubuntu-Change Icon Size
  • Lenny Laptop: Wifi Setup

Improved Linux Screen Space Management With PekWM

Filed under
Software

oreilly.com: With the growing popularity of netbooks more and more people are using small screens which support lower resolutions. The challenge for those who do a great deal of multitasking and tend to have lots of windows open is finding a good way to manage them on a small screen.

Why Do You Use Linux?

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: At some point, nearly everyone who uses Linux has someone ask them “what’s that?” This question almost invariably leads to “why is it better than <other operating system>?” What do you say?

In defence of Ubuntu against old school hackers

Filed under
Ubuntu

seemanta.wordpress: I have been using Ubuntu since version 5.04 came out. And let me add, this is the damnest Linux distro out there today !! I was a Debian devotee but after 4 years of Ubuntu, now I am a born-again Ubuntu convert.

From the End of the Beginning to the Beginning of the End

Filed under
OSS

opensource.org: When Eric Raymond posted the first of the Halloween Documents in 1998, it marked the end of the beginning for open source. That is to say those documents demonstrated that the logical superiority of the open source development model had penetrated the most headstrong corporate skull in the proprietary software universe: Microsoft.

Ubuntu: Community for Human beings

Filed under
Ubuntu

doctormo.wordpress: The ubuntu community is one of the most enjoyable I’ve ever been a part of, it has a much more diverse set of people and ideas than other development communities, but retains a strict sense of community and togetherness.

Also: The ubuntuforums are ::evil::

Who should Software Freedom sue on FAT32?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
Legal

blogs.zdnet.com: Microsoft owns FAT32, but it didn’t appear to pursue its rights. Until the TomTom case. At which point Jeremy Allison of Samba says Microsoft had secret cross-licensing deals with all those other guys which violate the GPL. So who should Software Freedom sue?

Review of Exherbo Linux (From A User’s Perspective)

Filed under
Linux

halffull.org: Exherbo is a Linux distribution led by a small team of opinionated developers. It’s lean, to say the least, but when they give you a solution for something you can believe it’s well engineered and that it does that task well - nothing more.

Knoppix 6.0: Perfect Distro (also for Netbooks)

Filed under
Linux

linux-magazine.com: Knoppix has always been regarded as one of the most versatile Linux distros out there, but the latest version of the venerable Live CD Linux distribution has got yet another trick up its sleeve.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Transparent GTK Themes

  • How To Edit Your Screensaver Settings In Ubuntu Intrepid
  • Automate Linux with Cron and Anacron
  • How to install curl for PHP5 under Ubuntu/Debian
  • HOWTO : Convert existing ext3 to ext4

sidux 2008-04 Pontos - Not for the faint-hearted

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: Some time ago, a fellow user in one of the forums suggested I try sidux. Why I asked? Well, he said, sidux is Debian-based, it's light, stable and fast. After reading online a bit, I found overall positive impressions, I decided to follow suit and test sidux.

Resurrect your old PC

Filed under
Linux
Software

tuxradar.com: Rather than throw old hardware away because it can't cope with Vista's bloat, we show you how to put it to good use - read on to learn how to transform your old computer into a mail server, a fileserver, a web server, a spam blocker, a PC for kids and more!

QEMU 0.10.0 Release To Bring Many Features

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: QEMU, the popular open-source processor emulator that can be run as a user-space program and also has found its way into use by the KVM and VirtualBox projects, will soon reach version 0.10.0

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • You Can Now Play UT3 On Linux, Sort Of

  • Ubuntu Netbook Remix and Debian Lenny on the Samsung NC10
  • Jaunty Alpha 5 Ramblings
  • Is Open Source Ready To Get The Message?
  • 10 Gnome Action Movies
  • When purists become pragmatists
  • Power Management: ATI Catalyst vs. Open-Source ATI Driver
  • Application Installing (II)
  • math: Windows 7 + netbook = failure - GNU/Linux as remaining winner!
  • New CEO, New Drupal CMS Offerings for Acquia
  • Michael Jackson using Drupal
  • Nokia puts out help wanted sign on Qt
  • Linux loses more netbook market share
  • Do Open Source Eyeballs Really Work?
  • Tightening purse strings will turn many businesses on to Open Source Software
  • When open source moves from evangelism to implementation
  • Cisco's PostPath to Linux powered hosted email
  • Worker: new version on 10th anniversary
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2009.03.06
  • User Friendly Comic Strip
  • Sacred Gold On Linux Has Gone Gold
  • SCO files appeal in dispute over computer code
  • Free Video Editors for Ubuntu
  • FOSS Debates, Part 1: Kernel Truths
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • What's New in Deepin File Manager 1.4
    Deepin File Manager (DFM) reached version 1.4 at March 2017. Its a bugfix version, but very interesting as it brings many new features. The most noticeable changes are Settings dialog, new disk-space display, new "Format" option on disk storage, and new copying dialog. It's smoother now by having drop shadow on file/folder icons. DFM is much more beautiful and usable in this 1.4 version. Anyway, you can upgrade DFM to 1.4 on deepin OS, or in another distro (Manjaro DDE or Ubuntu).
  • Rock On: Deepin Music is Now Available as a Snap App on Ubuntu
    Deepin envy is a condition afflicting Linux users who like the look of Deepin Linux’s apps, but don’t want to switch entire distro to use then. And there’s finally a cure: Snaps. Snap apps allow applications to bundle in all of their dependencies, which makes it easy for apps that typically rely on a certain set of libraries to run on distributions where those libraries are not normally available (or are, but only through additional repos and installing all sorts of junk that conflicts with your current system).
  • Nord: Modern Design Color Theme Palette for Your Terminal
    Nord is a minimal flat design theme pattern created to enhance your work experience by improving focus and readability for code syntax highlighting and UI. It has 4 main colors namely Polar Night, Snow Storm, Frost, and Aurora, which are further partitioned into a total of 16 dimmed pastel. It has been used to style so many things including iTerm, Hyper Terminal, and Intelli J IDE, among others.
  • PeaZip 6.4 Open-Source Archiver Brings Support for P7ZIP 16.02, Tabbed Browsing
    The development team behind the open-source and multi-platform PeaZip archiver manager utility announced the release of PeaZip 6.4.0, an important update that brings new features and lots of improvements. PeaZip 6.4.0 comes one and a half months after the release of the version 6.3.1, and updates the backend to use p7zip 16.02 on 64-bit GNU/Linux platforms, as well as pea 0.61 for all supported operating systems. Under the hood, there are a bunch of fixes, performance improvements, and code cleanup.
  • GnuCash 2.6.16 Free Accounting Software Adds HiDPI Improvements, Bug Fixes
    The development team behind the GnuCash open-source and cross-platform accounting software announced the release and immediate availability of the sixteenth maintenance update to the 2.6 stable series. GnuCash 2.6.16 comes four months after the release of version 2.6.15, which means that it's also the first to launch in 2017. It also means that a lot of issues reported by users since then have been addressed, including the display of small reports on HiDPI screens, wrong menu entry in the "Tip of the Day" dialog, and much more.
  • Notepadqq – Source Code Editor for Linux
    Notepadqq is a free, an open source code editor and Notepad replacement, that supports several languages (100 languages supported) and helps developers to work more efficiently.
  • Fman is a Powerful Dual Pane File Manager
    If you’re looking for a dual-pane file manager available for Linux (or macOS or Windows) look no further than Fman. Fman is pitched as “modern file manager for power users”. It has a clean design, runs quickly, and its functionality can be extended through plugins.

Leftovers: OSS

  • Blockchain Startups Venture Beyond Bitcoin
    Bitcoin is the most widely-known example of blockchain-based technology, but many of today's startups are looking past the cryptocurrency and towards other, more business-friendly implementations. European blockchain startup incubator Outlier Ventures and Frost & Sullivan have mapped out the blockchain startup landscape, identifying several key areas of activity. It outlines possible paths to success following a busy year for blockchain investments.
  • Another Sandy Bridge Era Motherboard Now Supported By Coreboot
    The Sapphire Pure Platinum H61 is the latest motherboard to be supported by mainline Coreboot for replacing the board's proprietary BIOS.
  • OSI Welcomes the Journal of Open Source Software as Affiliate Member
    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), a global non-profit organization formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and communities, announced that the Journal Of Open Source Software (JOSS), a peer-reviewed journal for open source research software packages, is now an OSI affiliate member.
  • Open source project uses Docker for serverless computing
    Serverless computing has fast become a staple presence on major clouds, from Amazon to Azure. It’s also inspiring open source projects designed to make the concept of functions as a service useful to individual developers. The latest of these projects, called simply Functions as a Service (FaaS) by developer and Linux User contributor Alex Ellis, uses Docker and its native Swarm cluster management technology to package any process as a function available through a web API.
  • PyCharm 2017.1, MicroStrategy 2017.1, Next.js 2.0, and Ubuntu 17.04 final beta released — SD Times news digest: March 27, 2017
  • Open source JavaScript, Node.js devs get NPM Orgs for free
    The SaaS-based tool, which features capabilities like role-based access control, semantic versioning, and package discovery, now can be used on public code on the NPM registry, NPM Inc. said on Wednesday. Developers can transition between solo projects, public group projects, and commercial projects, and users with private registries can use Orgs to combine code from public and private packages into a single project.
  • Slaying Monoliths at Netflix with Node.js
    The growing number of Netflix subscribers -- nearing 85 million at the time of this Node.js Interactive talk -- has generated a number of scaling challenges for the company. In his talk, Yunong Xiao, Principal Software Engineer at Netflix, describes these challenges and explains how the company went from delivering content to a global audience on an ever-growing number of platforms, to supporting all modern browsers, gaming consoles, smart TVs, and beyond. He also looks at how this led to radically modifying their delivery framework to make it more flexible and resilient.
  • Mudlet, the open source MUD client has a new major stable build available
    I don't know how many of you play MUDs, but Mudlet, an open source cross-platform MUD client has hit version 3.0.

today's howtos

Minimal Linux Live

Minimal Linux Live is, as the name suggests, a very minimal Linux distribution which can be run live from a CD, DVD or USB thumb drive. One of the things which set Minimal Linux Live (MLL) apart from other distributions is that, while the distribution is available through a 7MB ISO file download, the project is designed to be built from source code using a shell script. The idea is that we can download scripts that will build MLL on an existing Linux distribution. Assuming we have the proper compiler tools on our current distribution, simply running a single shell script and waiting a while will produce a bootable ISO featuring the MLL operating system. Yet another option the MLL project gives us is running the distribution inside a web browser using a JavaScript virtual machine. The browser-based virtual machine running MLL can be found on the project's website, under the Emulator tab. This gives us a chance to try out the operating system in our web browser without installing or building anything. I decided to try the MLL build process to see if it would work and how long it would take if everything went smoothly. I also wanted to find out just how much functionality such a small distribution could offer. The project's documentation mostly covers building MLL on Ubuntu and Linux Mint and so I decided to build MLL on a copy of Ubuntu 16.04 I had running in a virtual machine. The steps to build MLL are fairly straight forward. On Ubuntu, we first install six packages to make sure we have all the required dependencies. Then we download an archive containing MLL's build scripts. Then we unpack the archive and run the build script. We just need to type four commands in Ubuntu's virtual terminal to kick-start the build process. Read more