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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 25 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Hacker Evolution: Untold For GNU/Linux Goes Beta
  • FFII: EU Trade Agreement with Korea Endangers Developers
  • Ubuntu Tweak 0.5.0 Finally released; Tons Of New Features
  • The Debian Pennybox
  • Manage your podcasts using gPodder
  • Hot New Stuff again
  • Ubuntu v. Macintosh and Windows
  • Hands-on the ELSE Linux smartphone at CES 2010
  • Can a student go fully open-source for 48 hours?
  • Forcing dpkg through configuration errors
  • Linux Basement - Episode 48 - Holiday Geek Roundup

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • iPhone Tethering on Ubuntu 9.10
  • US Robotics dial up modem NOT working on Ubuntu
  • Creating a Fancy Website Layout in Gimp 2.6
  • How To Make A Kernel Sandbox using QEMU
  • Practical Tips for Using Top
  • Use KDE Plasma on Gnome with Emerald and Compiz
  • Background and Foreground Utilities
  • Easily Create A Custom Ubuntu Live CD with UCK
  • Send HTML emails via Perl and Google
  • Abby front-end to download videos

Review: openSolaris 2008.11

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: At work they were asking us to get familiar with openSolaris for a potential future project. I’d played with it a few years ago, so I decided to check out the latest version I had. On of my LXF discs had openSolaris 2008.11 and I figured that while I was checking it out I’d review it as well.

“Folder view” Screenlet – Linux alternative to “Fences”

duncsweb.com: Most of you probably know “Fences”, a program that organizes your cluttered desktop by letting you create and put boxes called “Fences” on your desktop and then you can create multiple fences and put your icons in them. I was a little disappointed when i couldn’t find any Linux alternative to Fences BUT, this problem has been solved because of a screenlet called “Folder view.”

Mystery Marvell EBOX is tiny, runs Ubuntu, 1080p video

liliputing.com: As I was wandering past Marvell’s exhibit at CES this weekend, I spotted an incredibly tiny PC called the EBOX connected to a big screen LCD.

A netbook users review of Linux Mint 8

Filed under
Linux

fewt.com: Thursday evening I broke my install on my Eee PC 1000HE in such a way that I needed to recover the data from my /home partition and reinstall the OS. I thought that since I'm waiting for EB4 I may as well just install another distribution and play.

The FreeType License

Filed under
Software
OSS

blogs.fsfe.org: The FreeType library is released under a dual license: you can choose either the FTL (FreeType License) or the GPL, version 2. That means that a software stack that uses FreeType has to be license-compatible with one or the other (or both).

High-Availability Storage With GlusterFS On Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a high-availability storage with two storage servers (Ubuntu 9.10) that use GlusterFS. Each storage server will be a mirror of the other storage server, and files will be replicated automatically across both storage servers. The client system (Ubuntu 9.10 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.

15 Cool and Funny Linux T-shirts

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Since I'm planning to buy several Linux-inspired clothes, I was searching the web for places or sites that offer printed t-shirts that look cool and have a bit of sense of humor. Here are some of the coolest and funniest.

Few exciting things in KDE sc 4.4 RC1

Filed under
KDE

tm-travolta.net: KDE 4.4 was released yesterday. To celebrate incoming KDE SC 4.4 release, I will mention few things I find exciting or interesting in it.

Linux at Bett 2010

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: You'll have to look hard for Open Source software at Bett 2010, but it's there all right and may even win a BETT award!

Linux is Terminally ill

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: Are you a programmer? do you use Linux often and find it fun?.. is the rest of you family and friends all programmers? your Pizza delivery guy? or that lassie at your local supermarket chain who can't work the till properly? ? does she know about repositories or how to install Linux apps from other distros?

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Silicon - auto image mounter for KDE 4
  • directhex-grub-themes 00000001 release announcement
  • Think Geek: Customer Service Experience
  • New Indicator Applet & Messaging Menu for Ubuntu 10.04
  • git bisect, ccache, cowbuilder
  • GHCA’s Computer Lab Running Gentoo Linux
  • DtO: Linux Tech Support - Day 2
  • OpenShot 1.0 Has Arrived
  • Acire: Delivering A World Of Python Snippets
  • openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 105 is out!
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2010.01.08

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Use Orca to monitor system performance
  • download mms streaming videos in Ubuntu
  • Encryption, Decryption & Signing Easily With Seahorse
  • Ubuntu Karmic change CPU Frequency as user
  • Understanding Partition / Filesystem Mount Options (fstab file)
  • Correct tag errors in your music collection with Easy Tag
  • Show the Restore, Maximize, Minimize buttons in Ubuntu Remix
  • Get Facebook albums with python
  • Quickly open Folders/Special Locations in Ubuntu Desktop
  • Howto: User Windows 7 desktop themes in Linux
  • Linux and Your iPhone / iPod Touch
  • Elite Commander skin for Midnight Commander
  • How to get different Plasmoids in different workspace in KDE SC 4

Searching and Filtering Photos in digiKam — Part 2

Filed under
Software

scribblesandsnaps.wordpress: Besides the quick search and filtering tools at the bottom of the main window, digiKam offers more advanced search features accessible via the left sidebar. Here, you’ll find a variety of search options.

A few cool plugins for The GIMP (and how to add them)

Filed under
GIMP

ghacks.net: One of the many nicer aspects of the GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Project) is that, like Photoshop, you can extend it’s usability by adding plug-ins and scripts.

Google becoming "giant monopoly" - German minister

Filed under
Google

reuters.com: Internet search engine Google Inc is becoming a "giant monopoly" like Microsoft and could face legal action if it does not become more transparent, Germany's justice minister said.

Does Ubuntu Make Linux Look Bad?

Filed under
Ubuntu

robinzrants.wordpress: On one of the computer forums I visit, someone has suggested that Ubuntu Linux “makes Linux look bad.”

openSUSE 11.2… the day after.

Filed under
SUSE

linux.eregion.de: So now it’s been a few weeks since openSUSE 11.2 hit the street. Here are a few impressions / factoids that i discovered so far:

Kernel Sandbox

Filed under
Linux

kdubois.net: Kernel coding is a bit of a pain, if you compare it to userspace coding. You loose a lot of nice things in userspace, like segfaults (think you can’t live with them? try living without them Wink ), and a bad kernel build can easily stop a system cold. These stupid little annoyances can really stop beginners from getting involved!

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More in Tux Machines

Software: VirtualBox, TeX Live Cockpit, Mailspring, Qt, Projects, and Maintainers

  • VirtualBox 5.2.2 Brings Linux 4.14 Fixes, HiDPI UI Improvements
    The Oracle developers behind VM VirtualBox have released a new maintenance build in the VirtualBox 5.2 series that is a bit more exciting than their usual point releases.
  • TeX Live Cockpit
    I have been working quite some time on a new front end for the TeX Live Manager tlmgr. Early versions have leaked into TeX Live, but the last month or two has seen many changes in tlmgr itself, in particular support for JSON output. These changes were mostly driven by the need (or ease) of the new frontend: TLCockpit.
  • Mailspring – A New Open Source Cross-Platform Email Client
    Mailspring is a fork of the now discontinued Nylas Mail client. It does, however, offer a much better performance, and is built with a native C++ sync engine instead of JavaScript. According to the development team, the company is sunsetting further development of Mailspring. Mailspring offers virtually all the best features housed in Nylas Mail, and thanks to its native C++ sync engine it uses fewer dependencies which results in less lag and a reduction in RAM usage by 50% compared to Nylas Mail.
  • Removing Qt 4 from Debian testing (aka Buster): some statistics
    We started filing bugs around September 9. That means roughly 11 weeks, which gives us around 8 packages fixed a week, aka 1.14 packages per day. Not bad at all!
  • Products Over Projects
    However, projects are not the only way of funding and organizing software development. For instance, many companies that sell software as a product or a service do not fund or organize their core product/platform development in the form of projects. Instead, they run product development and support using near-permanent teams for as long as the product is sold in the market. The budget may vary year on year but it is generally sufficient to fund a durable, core development organization continuously for the life of the product. Teams are funded to work on a particular business problem or offering over a period of time; with the nature work being defined by a business problem to address rather than a set of functions to deliver. We call this way of working as “product-mode” and assert that it is not necessary to be building a software product in order to fund and organize software development like this.
  • Why we never thank open source maintainers

    It is true that some of you guys can build a tool in a hackathon, but maintaining a project is a lot more difficult than building a project. Most of the time they are not writing code, but [...]

today's howtos

Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.