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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

KDE NetworkManager interface gets a shiny plasma overhaul

Filed under
KDE

arstechnica.com: In most modern Linux distributions, network configuration is handled by NetworkManager, a desktop-neutral service that seamlessly manages connections. KDE contributor Sebastian Kügler is working on a new Plasma-based front-end.

The Year of the Linux Everything Else

Filed under
Linux

linux-foundation.org/weblogs: You’d think CES would be a good indicator of the major technology trends in electronics. But Linux at CES? That’s unlikely to show up in your RSS reader. Heard any your friends talk about how Linux is taking over CES? No? Me neither.

KDE 4.2 “The Answer” - My Experiences So Far

Filed under
KDE

itnewstoday.com: KDE 4.2 is fast approaching, and will reach final form at the end of this month. The second beta is available now, with the release candidate due next week. I thought I would post my thoughts on this great desktop as it is at this point in its development phase.

Linux games - First Person Shooters - Part Three

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: Welcome to the third installment in the First Person Shooters saga. Today, we will talk about two more solid choices for meeting people online - and then shooting them.

Ubuntu System Panel Gives You Quick Access To Your Applications

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

makeuseof.com: Ubuntu System Panel (USP) is a configurable Gnome launcher that you can add to your Ubuntu (and other Linux distros based on Gnome) panel for quick and easy access to the various applications and places.

Voting for the 2008 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards is Now Open

Filed under
Linux
OSS

linuxquestions.org: It’s that time once again. Voting for the 2008 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards is now open. The Members Choice Awards allow the Linux community to select their favorite products in a variety of categories.

Why Windows 7 will crush Linux

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Why Windows 7 will crush Linux

  • Should We Trash Windows Vista – or BadVista?
  • Techiemoe tries Microsoft Windows 7 Beta 1
  • Extend the Windows 7 Trial from 30 to 120 Days
  • Adding Windows 7 to Linux Multiboot

A triple-boot system with GRUB: Debian GNU/Linux "Lenny", FreeDOS 1.0, and Windows 98SE

Filed under
HowTos

This last Christmas, I refurbished and installed computers for two of my children. As we still have a pile of old games in a drawer, I wanted to provide multi-boot systems. This was much easier and more satisfying than the last time I set up a Linux/Windows.

The "I'm Linux" Video Contest

Filed under
Linux

If you've been alive and aware of mass media over the last twelve months, you've probably seen television commercials from Apple and Microsoft touting their operating system. From Apple's ubiquitous "I'm a Mac" to Jerry Seinfeld to Microsoft's "I'm a PC" retort, operating system commercials have been flooding the airways. Except one OS has been notably absent – Linux.

A Weekend With Arch

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com/blog: Within a few months of beginning with Linux, it became obvious that I was one of those who have severe difficulties settling on a distribution. This weekend, I finally got a chance to take Arch for a spin.

The Dark Art of Sound on Linux

Filed under
Linux

glyph.twistedmatrix: I've been trying to get a USB headset to work gracefully with a variety of applications on Linux for quite some time. Recently I had a bit more time to investigate why this is so difficult, and to learn a few things about ALSA. Inspired by Mr. Sterling, I feel compelled to share the results of this ... experimentation.

Red Hat's Open Source Software of Value in These Recessionary Times

Filed under
Linux

seekingalpha.com: With the current recessionary environment, perhaps it’s not such a bad time to take a look at investing in penguins and fedoras. While it’s been asked before how a company can profit off of something that is free and open, Red Hat has done a fairly good job of it over the years.

Kernel Log: What's new in 2.6.29 - Part 2: WiMAX

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: In Part 2 of the Kernel Log's coverage of the major changes happening in the main development branch for the Linux kernel 2.6.29 release, we look at a major new addition to Linux's networking capability, WiMAX support.

OpenSolaris distros

Filed under
OS

linuxformat.co.uk: A few months ago we looked at OpenSolaris, Sun's effort to get the community involved in its Unix flavour. Now we explore some of the spin-off projects that have popped up, including MilaX, Belenix and Nexenta...

Is OpenOffice.org a 'dying horse'?

Filed under
Interviews
OOo

zdnetasia.com: OpenOffice.org is still not past its expiry date, but more needs to be done to drive community participation and ensure the open source software remains relevant, say industry watchers.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 285

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Interview: Paul Sherman, Absolute Linux

  • News: Debian releases new "Lenny" live images, openSUSE announces KDE 3.5 live CDs, Fedora votes on code name for version 11, Sun Microsystems and FreeBSD cooperate on kernel features, PC/OS and Gentoo interviews
  • Released last week: SystemRescueCd 1.1.4, MythDora 10.21
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 9.04 Alpha 3, Mandriva Linux 2009.1 Beta 1
  • New additions: MOPSLinux, Runtu
  • New distribution: 4Biblen, Easy Peasy, Incognito, LinuxEllSchool, Paranoid Linux, pure:dyne, Toutou Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Linux and the Third World

Filed under
Linux

jdeeth.blogspot: The government of Vietnam announced last week that it will be converting all its government computers to open source software by the end of 2010, with conversion to begin almost immediately. So apparently open source software really is communism.

What's new in 2.6.29 - Part 1: Dodgy Wifi drivers and AP support

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Scarcely two weeks after the release of Linux 2.6.28, Linus Torvalds has integrated comprehensive changes for kernel version 2.6.29 into the main development branch. As of Friday morning, he had added a whopping 7550 patches.

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Btrfs and Squashfs merged into Linux kernel

  • It's 2009 and SCO are maintaining the Linux rage - what the?
  • Linux Outlaws 71 - Evil@Home
  • 20 awesome free OS downloads that aren't Windows 7
  • Mozilla Craziness
  • European SME representation was against OOXML
  • How to change DMA settings on Ubuntu
  • ASUS Eeeeeeeee PC: Innovative NetBook
  • Five reasons to seriously consider buying a netbook
  • I’m not compatible with Linux
  • Stopping Pythons from eating your Rams
  • Install Windows 7 with Ubuntu using VirtualBox
  • How secure is open source disk-encryption?
  • Start gnome screensaver from the command-line

Windows 7 as “Linux killer”? How times have changed!

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet.com: Microsoft makes for an unlikely David, and Linux an even unlikelier Goliath — but here we are. A few years ago, Linux was positioned as the “Windows killer.” Now Windows 7 is being positioned as the Linux killer.

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More in Tux Machines

New GNU/Linux Releases: TheSSS, Arkas OS, Black Lab, and Parrot

  • The Smallest Server Suite Gets Special Edition with PHP 7.0.15, Apache 2.4.25
    4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia about the availability of a special edition of the TheSSS (The Smallest Server Suite) Live Linux operating system. Carrying the same version number as the original TheSSS release, namely 21.0, and dubbed TheSSS7, the new flavor ships with more recent PHP packages from the 7.0.x series. Specifically, TheSSS7 includes PHP 7.0.15, while TheSSS comes with PHP 5.6.30.
  • Descent OS Is Dead, Arkas OS Takes Its Place and It's Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    Some of you out there might remember the Descent OS distro created by Brian Manderville and based on the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, and today we have some bad news for them as the development is now officially closed. Descent OS first appeared in February 2012 as a lightweight Ubuntu derivative built around the GNOME 2 desktop environment. Back then, it was known as Descent|OS, and was quite actively developed with new features and components borrowed from the latest Ubuntu releases.
  • Black Lab Linux 8.1 Out Now with LibreOffice 5.3, It's Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    Softpedia was informed today by the Black Lab Software project about the general availability of the first point release to the Black Lab Linux 8.0 operating system series. Serving as a base release to the company's enterprise offerings and equipped with all the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel from the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, Black Lab Linux 8.1 comes with up-to-date components and the latest security patches ported from Ubuntu's repositories as of February 15, 2017. "Today we are pleased to announce the release of Black Lab Linux 8.1. Our first incremental release to the 8.0 series. In this release we have brought all security updates up to Feb 15, 2017, as well as application updates," said Roberto J. Dohnert, CEO of Black Lab Software.
  • Parrot 3.5 – Call For Betatesters
    We did our best to prepare these preview images including all the updates and the new features introduced since the last release, but now we need your help to understand how to make it even better, and of course we need your help to understand if there is something that doesn’t work as expected or something that absolutely needs to be included in the final release.

Linux and Graphics

  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Now Available for Linux Lite Users, Here's How to Install It
    Minutes after the release of Linux kernel 4.10 last evening, Jerry Bezencon from the Linux Lite project announced that users of the Ubuntu-based distribution can now install it on their machines. Linux 4.10 is now the most advanced kernel branch for all Linux-based operating systems, and brings many exciting new features like virtual GPU support, better writeback management, eBPF hooks for cgroups, as well as Intel Cache Allocation Technology support for the L2/L3 caches of Intel processors.
  • Wacom's Intuos Pro To Be Supported By The Linux 4.11 Kernel
    Jiri Kosina submitted the HID updates today for the Linux 4.11 kernel cycle.
  • Mesa 13.0.5 Released for Linux Gamers with over 70 Improvements, Bug Fixes
    We reported the other day that Mesa 13.0.5 3D Graphics Library will be released this week, and it looks like Collabora's Emil Velikov announced it earlier this morning for all Linux gamers. Mesa 13.0.5 is a maintenance update to the Mesa 13.0 stable series of the open source graphics stack used by default in numerous, if not all GNU/Linux distributions, providing gamers with powerful drivers for their AMD Radeon, Nvidia, and Intel GPUs. It comes approximately three weeks after the Mesa 13.0.4 update.
  • mesa 13.0.5

Interview: Thomas Weissel Installing Plasma in Austrian Schools

With Plasma 5 having reached maturity for widespread use we are starting to see rollouts of it in large environments. Dot News interviewed the admin behind one such rollout in Austrian schools. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Top Lightweight Linux Distributions To Try In 2017
    Today I am going to discuss the top lightweight Linux distros you can try this year on your computer. Although you got yourself a prettyLinuxle linux already but there is always something new to try in Linux. Remember I recommend to try this distros in virtualbox firstly or with the live boot before messing with your system. All distro that I will mention here will be new and somewhat differ from regular distros.
  • [ANNOUNCE] linux-4.10-ck1 / MuQSS CPU scheduler 0.152
  • MSAA Compression Support For Intel's ANV Vulkan Driver
    Intel developer Jason Ekstrand posted a patch over the weekend for enabling MSAA compression support within the ANV Vulkan driver.
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 31
    As we announced in the previous report, our 31th Scrum sprint was slightly shorter than the usual ones. But you would never say so looking to this blog post. We have a lot of things to talk you about!
  • Comparing Mobile Subscriber Data Across Different Sources - How accurate is the TomiAhonen Almanac every year?
    You’ll see that last spring I felt the world had 7.6 Billion total mobile subscriptions when machine-to-machine (M2M) connections are included. I felt the world had 7.2 Billion total subscriptions when excluding M2M and just counting those in use by humans. And the most relevant number (bottom line) is the ‘unique’ mobile users, which I felt was an even 5.0 Billion humans in 2015. The chart also has the total handsets-in-use statistic which I felt was 5.6 Billion at the end of 2015. Note that I was literally the first person to report on the distinction of the unique user count vs total subscriptions and I have been urging, nearly begging for the big industry giants to also measure that number. They are slowly joining in that count. Similarly to M2M, we also are now starting to see others report M2M counts. I have yet to see a major mobile statistical provider give a global count of devices in use. That will hopefully come also, soon. But lets examine these three numbers that we now do have other sources, a year later, to see did I know what I was doing.