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Sunday, 27 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Novell nearing sale, says report; shares rise in heavy trade

Filed under
SUSE

reuters.com: Shares of Novell Inc (NOVL.O) rose as much as 6 percent after U.S. publication New York Post reported the business software maker is three to four weeks away from signing a deal to sell itself.

Default Wallpaper

$169 Linux tablet… sortof

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

hackaday.com: The Insignia Infocast is a $169 simple media device being sold at Best Buy. Marketed as a way to share photos and run Chumby apps, hackers are starting to release packages to extend its features.

Preview: GIMP 2.8

Filed under
GIMP

cristalinux.blogspot: At the moment, GIMP 2.8 is still in the works. The current development version, GIMP 2.7.1 was recently released (July 3rd), and already shows many of the new features that will make GIMP 2.8 a big step forward. The LIST of UI changes is pretty impressive, here are some highlights:

Linux distributions need fresher drivers

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Some Linux users want to have a stable system without constant updates, while others always want to have the latest versions so they can get drivers for new hardware. A multistage approach with two "current" distributions might be a solution.

What's next for Firefox on Linux?

Filed under
Moz/FF

techradar.com: Growth over the last year has been static, and things are about to get worse. A competing open source browser has been able to go from zero to 7% market share, and doesn't show any sign of slowing down.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • The Final Ubuntu 10.10 Default Wallpaper, Released!
  • Frictional Nails The Fear Factor
  • Why Linux Is Poised for Domination
  • HoN Trial Is Now Open For Everyone
  • Debian Bugs Search using UDD
  • The Arc of the Moral Universe is Long...
  • Text editor frenzy
  • Sabayon KDE 4.5.x ?
  • Microsoft does the right thing for Russian protest groups
  • ‘Til Tuesday
  • Bruce Perens Waiting for Diaspora, Deleted Twitter Facebook
  • Best Buy using Drupal
  • Videoporama: Create Cool Video Slideshows
  • Cracking Linux on the Desktop – A Proposal
  • FSF: Look who's using free software...
  • Is Oracle poised to effectively end open source software?
  • Linux Basement Episode 61 - Whadya Talkin About Wheezy

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Emacs in the real world – part 1
  • 7 Linux fdisk Command Examples to Manage Partitions
  • How to Text scrolling off the screen?
  • How to perform sha256sum check on Ubuntu
  • Free Up a Lot of Disk Space on Ubuntu by Deleting Cached Package Files
  • Using python’s imp to dynamically load modules
  • Customize Your Icons With icoGEN [Gnome]
  • Shrink or Reduce Partition Size in Windows 7
  • Reliance Netconnect Broadband+ on Ubuntu
  • How not to update GPG keys
  • SELinux quicky
  • Create a Custom Debian Live CD through the Web
  • Updated Guides (KDE4 and Conky)
  • On-Access virus scanning on openSUSE 11.3
  • Install FluxBox Themes “Styles”
  • Linux/Unix Security Guides, Resources, Books, Manuals
  • Migrating from Microsoft SQL Server to PostgreSQL
  • HP Photosmart C4380 over WiFi problem Solved
  • nginx auth – allowing IP or password-based access
  • Setting the Resolution in an X-less VM

Australian e-tax software unjust: Stallman

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.com.au: Richard Stallman, president and founder of the Free Software Foundation, has said that the Australian Taxation Office's e-tax software is "unjust".

aptosid 2010-02 released

Filed under
Linux

aptosid.net: sidux redux aptosid ISOs are available for download. Featuring kernel 2.6.35.4 and KDE 4.4.5, it is a nice upgrade to current sidux.

Upgrading to Ubuntu Lucid

Filed under
Ubuntu

manilastandardtoday.com: FOR months, the intriguing message stayed on my Update Manager. “New Ubuntu release ‘10.04’ is available,” the notice read. Beside it, an “Upgrade” button beckoned.

Fedora defers systemd to F15

Filed under
Linux

lwn.net: The meeting summary from the September 14 FESCO meeting (click below) states that the project has decided to ship Fedora 14 with upstart, giving systemd one more development cycle to stabilize.

OpenSolaris spork ready for download

Filed under
OS

theregister.co.uk: It is not quite ready for primetime, but with the announcement of OpenIndiana, a so-called spork of Oracle's OpenSolaris Unix distribution, the server world is getting a familiar, re-opened, and community-developed operating system aimed specifically at data center workloads.

First-Person Shooter Game for Linux: Warsow Review

Filed under
Reviews

It's been a while since I last reviewed a shooter game for Linux, and one of them was World of Padman (reviewed here), which was a cartoon-like, funny first-person shooter. Well, the same goes for Warsow, the game I'm going to talk about in this article. Every graphical aspect of Warsow indicates we're dealing with a cartoon-like universe, from the character models to weapons and maps.

What Is The Wayland Display Server & Its Protocol?

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: While Kristian Høgsberg is now likely on his way to Toulouse, France for the 2010 X Developers' Summit, over the past day he has been working on some minor changes to the Wayland Display Server that he has now been working on for a while to leverage the latest Linux graphics technologies.

Linux Mint 9 Xfce

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Last week I looked at the Debian version of Linux Mint. This time around I’m going to cover the Xfce version.

Linux For a Green Desktop

Filed under
Linux
Software

linuxaria.com: Thanks to your choice of Linux operating system you are already on the philosophical choice closer to nature:

5 Great Linux Tools You Should Know About

Filed under
Software

internetling.com: Efforts to open source wireless card drivers are finally paying off, especially with Broadcom’s recent announcement. But until the software reaches ready-to-deploy status, we will often stumble upon a broken wireless connection on a new install.

Open source, helping the children of the future.

Filed under
Linux
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: The children today have it lucky. These days children have iThis and iThat as well as cell(mobile) phones, netbooks, laptops and the now common desktop pc. The problem with these is that the exploration potential of these devices is very limited.

Getting physical

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Getting physical - face recognition input mockup
  • Apple Magic Trackpad drivers land in Ubuntu with 10 finger touch
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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux on the Desktop Versus Proprietary Forms

  • Why I use a Mac computer, but an Android phone
    Yes, you could use a flavour of Linux on cheaper hardware, but then you trade the great Mac graphical interface with the ones available to Linux. You can fight me in the comments, but deep down you know I’m right. MacOS comes with Bash, and many of the tools those familiar with Linux would expect to have by default in their favourite distribution, including basics like “whois”, which aren’t installed in Windows by default.
  • Everything you knew about Chromebooks is wrong
    The original assumed vision of the Chromebook platform was a laptop and operating system capable of running only the Chrome web browser. You could do anything you wanted, as long as you wanted to stay on the web at all times. Today, the best new Chromebooks can runs apps from three additional operating systems. Not only do Chromebooks run apps, but they run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebooks can run apps from Android, Linux and Windows concurrently in the same session.
  • Games, Tests and GitLab CI
    We are getting midterm of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle and many things already happened in the Games world. I will spare the user facing news for later as today I want to tell you about development features we desperatly needed as maintainers: tests and continuous integration. TL;DR: GLib, Meson, Flatpak and GitLab CI make writing and running tests super easy!

Graphics: Vulkan and Vega M

  • Vulkan Virgl Has Kicked Off For Supporting This Graphics/Compute API Within VMs
    Of the hundreds of projects for this year's Google Summer of Code, there are many interesting GSoC 2018 projects but one of those that I am most excited for is Vulkan-Virgl for getting this modern API supported with hardware acceleration by guest virtual machines. As implied by the name, this effort is based upon the Virgl project started by David Airlie and originally tasked with getting OpenGL acceleration to guest VMs using a fully open-source Linux driver stack. Virgl has been in good shape for a while now with OpenGL, while this summer the hope is to get the Vulkan API support going for opening up VMs to using this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • AMDVLK Driver Lands Half-Float Additions, Many Other Improvements
    There's been another weekly-ish public code push to the AMDVLK open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver stack and this time around it's heavy on feature work. There has been a fair amount of changes pertaining to half-float (FP16) support including support for the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension, prepping for VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch, FP16 interpolation intrinsics and register settings, and more.
  • Vega M Graphics On Intel Kabylake G CPUs Are Beginning To Work Under Linux
    We have been covering the Linux driver upbringing of "Vega M" for the Vega/Polaris graphics found in select newer Intel "Kabylake G" processors. The code is still in flight before it will work in all released versions of the Linux driver components, but for those willing to build the code or rely upon third party repositories, Vega M is now working on Linux. As I have covered in various past articles, the open-source driver support for Radeon Vega M is queued into DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle, Mesa 18.1 albeit with new hardware I always recommend using the latest Git (current Mesa 18.2), and there are also binary GPU microcode files needed too.

Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more