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Saturday, 24 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ask Yoda: What the Heck is RTFM?

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Humor When you are hanging out in your favorite forums or mailing lists, you might see a newbie asking for help and don’t know where to start. Before you ask them to RTFM, ask them to read this post to understand about RTFM.

Why open source developers should thank Apple

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OSS From operating systems to phones, Apple has raised the competitive bar and opened doors for open source, even though their own use of open source has attracted criticism.

Counting the Cost of Free: What Value, Linux?

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Interviews Lora Bentley spoke with Amanda McPherson, marketing and developer programs VP at the Linux Foundation. She and two colleagues recently released a new paper, “Estimating the Total Development Cost of a Linux Distribution.”

Where The Btrfs Performance Is At Today With MeeGo using Btrfs by default, Canonical making plans for Btrfs in as soon as Ubuntu 10.10, and Novell now pushing Btrfs in openSUSE, among other milestones for this advanced Linux file-system, we decided to see where the Btrfs performance is now at with the Linux 2.6.35 kernel that's currently in development.

Scribus: Worth the Effort

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Software Desktop publishing applications are different from word processing programs. Desktop publishing isn't a sit-and-start-typing task; it requires more input from the user in terms of page layout, spacing and how elements are arranged.

today's leftovers:

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  • KDE and the Masters of the Universe – 2010-06-08
  • Comparing Access Control in Windows and Linux
  • We can accomplish more by sharing
  • Innovation: Still Open for Business
  • Fwd: Thanks from a Gentoo user
  • Chromium default Browser for Ubuntu 10.10
  • Linux inches up on desktop, holds steady on servers
  • FOSS-tablet business report
  • Novell wants a piece of Sun Oracle
  • SFLS: Episode 0x29: Motions for Judgment
  • Malta: Directive to boost uptake of open source

some howtos:

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  • customize Linux Mint 9
  • Building kernels the Debian way
  • Open UIF File (MagicISO Custom ISO Format) in Linux / MacOS X
  • Fix Window and Linux Boot Problems with the Super Grub Disk
  • [SOLVED] Can’t open /dev/dsp in Ubuntu
  • GRUB - embedding a configuration file
  • Easy desktop notification system
  • Manage Ubuntu Gnome Themes with Gstyle
  • 7 Chmod Command Examples for Beginners
  • Easiest way to install Google Chrome on Slackware
  • Mount ISO, IMG, BIN, MDF and NRG Files w Furious
  • Locking Down Firefox Preferences w new firefox.js
  • install Oracle Solaris Studio Express 6/10 on Slackware
  • Rar Unrar Support For Fedora 13 Goddard
  • Making Movies with Free Software
  • Convert any software packages to formats recognized by your distro using Alien
  • how to retrieve image size in perl
  • Privnote- A simple way to send longer messages on Twitter
  • DNS querying with dig

4 Great Alternatives to Gnome Panel Menu Bar

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Software One good thing about Linux system is that you can change almost every single aspect of the system. Dislike the dull wallpaper? Change it. Not happy with the default splash screen? Change it. Getting bored of the default panel? You can change it as well.

Google's new search index: Caffeine

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googleblog.blogspot: Today, we're announcing the completion of a new web indexing system called Caffeine. Caffeine provides 50 percent fresher results for web searches than our last index, and it's the largest collection of web content we've offered.

A little healthy kompetition

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larrythefreesoftwareguy.wordpress: I go back and forth between the two top desktop environments with Fedora on my Fujitsu laptop — the even numbers, as it turns out, have been GNOME and the odd (with nothing to read into this, honest) have been KDE. Since we’re now at Fedora 13, it’s KDE time.

User Interfaces Compared – Five Operating Systems, TWENTY Tests The gauntlet has been thrown down. I have been slapped in the face with a glove. Reader response to my previous six test comparison has been very strong. More tests were suggested.

Ubuntu Control Center Makes Using Ubuntu Easier

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Software Users who are new to Ubuntu might find it somewhat difficult to configure. Today we take a look at using Ubuntu Control Center which makes managing different aspects of the system easier.

Ubuntu Netbook Remix on the Acer Aspire One

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Ubuntu In preparation for this year's annual motorcycle trip, I purchased an Acer Aspire One Intel Atom N450 netbook. What follows are a few notes and suggestions for installing Ubuntu Netbook Remix (UNR) 10.04.

Peppermint Team – Q&A

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openbytes.wordpress: It was with great pleasure then that I was able to catch up with a couple of members from the Peppermint team and put to them some questions about Peppermint, their views on the future of the cloud and a variety of other subjects.

Report Card on Federal Openness

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  • Report Card on Federal Openness
  • Open Source for America Wants To Give An Openness Report Card

15 years of PHP

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Software Fifteen years ago today, on the 8th of June, 1995, Rasmus Lerdorf launched PHP with a post to the comp.infosystems.www.authoring.cgi Usenet news group. He announced version 1.0 of his "Personal Home Page Tools." live DVD 0.9.6 released

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Gaming We recently released a new version of our games distribution.

Ten years of IBM mainframe Linux

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Linux Back in March 1991, Stewart Alsop, venture capitalist and one time editor-in-chief of InfoWorld said, "I predict that the last mainframe will be unplugged on March 15, 1996." In 2010, while IBM doesn't break out its profits by individual server line, IBM's systems and technology group, reported 1st quarter revenue of $3.4 billion.

Nautilus Elementary Just Won't Stop Improving

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Software In our previous post we had a detailed discussion on what is nautilus elementary and how to install nautlius elementary in ubuntu using PPA. That was just a week ago. And already a number of important updates. Let's see what are the changes.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Facebook-Mozilla Rift, MDN, No More Notifications (If You Want)

  • Mozilla stops Facebook advertising, demands privacy changes
    It’s probably not top of Mark Zuckerberg’s worry list this week but Mozilla Corporation, developer of the Firefox browser, is officially unhappy with Facebook.
  • Results of the MDN “Competitive Content Analysis” SEO experiment
    The next SEO experiment I’d like to discuss results for is the MDN “Competitive Content Analysis” experiment. In this experiment, performed through December into early January, involved selecting two of the top search terms that resulted in MDN being included in search results—one of them where MDN is highly-placed but not at #1, and one where MDN is listed far down in the search results despite having good content available. The result is a comparison of the quality of our content and our SEO against other sites that document these technology areas. With that information in hand, we can look at the competition’s content and make decisions as to what changes to make to MDN to help bring us up in the search rankings.
  • No More Notifications (If You Want)
    Online, your attention is priceless. That’s why every site in the universe wants permission to send you notifications about new stuff. It can be distracting at best and annoying at worst. The latest version of Firefox for desktop lets you block those requests and many others.

EUPL planned actions

A revised set of guidelines and recommendations on the use of the open source licence EUPL v1.2 published by the Commission on 19 May 2017 will be developed, involving the DIGIT unit B.3 (Reusable Solutions) and the JRC 1.4 (Joint Research Centre – Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer). The existing licence wizard will be updated. New ways of promoting public administrations' use of open source will be investigated and planned (such as hackathons or app challenges on open source software). The target date for the release of this set of guidelines on the use of the European Public Licence EUPL v1.2, including a modified Licence Wizard, is planned Q2 2018. Read more

Security: Dropbox, FUD, CNCF, 'Cloud'

  • Dropbox has some genuinely great security reporting guidelines, but reserves the right to jail you if you disagree

    Dropbox's position, however reasonable in many of its aspects, is woefully deficient, because the company reserves the right to invoke DMCA 1201 and/or CFAA and other tools that give companies the power to choose who can say true things abour mistakes they've made.

    This is not normal. Before DRM in embedded software and cloud connectivity, became routine there were no restrictions on who could utter true words about defects in a product. [...]

  • Hackers Infect Linux Servers With Monero Miner via 5-Year-Old Vulnerability [Ed: A five-year-old vulnerability implies total neglect by sysadmins, not a GNU/Linux weakness]
    Attackers also modified the local cron jobs to trigger a "watchd0g" Bash script every three minutes, a script that checked to see if the Monero miner was still active and restarted XMRig's process whenever it was down.
  • GitHub: Our dependency scan has found four million security flaws in public repos [Ed: No, GitHub just ran a scan for old versions being used and reused. It cannot do this for proprietary software, but the issues are there and the risks are no better.]
    GitHub says its security scan for old vulnerabilities in JavaScript and Ruby libraries has turned up over four million bugs and sparked a major clean-up by project owners. The massive bug-find total was reached within a month of the initiative's launch in November, when GitHub began scanning for known vulnerabilities in certain popular open-source libraries and notifying project owners that they should be using an updated version.
  • Envoy CNCF Project Completes Security Audit, Delivers New Release
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) has begun a process of performing third-party security audits for its projects, with the first completed audit coming from the Envoy proxy project. The Envoy proxy project was created by ride-sharing company Lyft and officially joined the CNCF in September 2017. Envoy is a service mesh reverse proxy technology that is used to help scale micro-services data traffic.
  • Hybrid cloud security: Emerging lessons [Ed: 'Cloud' and security do not belong in the same headline because 'cloud' is a data breach, typically involving a company giving all its (and customers') data to some spying giant abroad]

A Look At The Relative Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation Costs On Windows vs. Linux

The latest in our Windows versus Linux benchmarking is looking at the relative performance impact on both Linux and Windows of their Spectre and Meltdown mitigation techniques. This round of tests were done on Windows 10 Pro, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and Clear Linux when having an up-to-date system on each OS where there is Spectre/Meltdown protection and then repeating the same benchmarks after reverting/disabling the security functionality. Read more