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Thursday, 20 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Best Email clients for Linux Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:38pm
Story Client Side Decoration Improvements Land In GTK+ Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:32pm
Story Who's afraid of Linux, anyway? Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:30pm
Story Coreboot Improvements Land For Lenovo Laptops Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:27pm
Story Will New Android/Windows PCs Find Success? Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:05pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:03pm
Story Kali Linux 1.0.6 released. Cryptsetup has “nuclear option” integrated Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:00pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:00pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 6:55pm
Story Linux 3.14 May Bring Big VMware GPU Driver Update Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 6:52pm

Jim Zemlin and the Linux Foundation: Looking after Linus

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Linux While Linus Torvalds, the father of Linux, has a wide and well established fan-base, fewer people are aware of the wider organisation that supports his vital kernel development work.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 264

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This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: First look - Parsix GNU/Linux 1.5r1

  • News: Fedora 10 code name, interview with Red Hat's Jim Whitehurst, Debconf8 Schedule
  • Released last week: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.7, Parsix GNU/Linux 1.5r1
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 8.10 Alpha 4, Mandriva Linux 2009 Beta 2, and openSUSE 11.1 Alpha 2
  • Reviewed last week: Mandriva 2009 Beta 1, Pardus 2008
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

KDE 3.5.10 to be released in August

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liquidat.wordpress: KDE 4.1 was released just days ago, but the KDE team already prepares the next release for August: KDE 3.5.10. While there won’t be any new features in it it will contain many bugfixes.

My favorite useful Compiz features

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adventuresinswitching.blogspot: Users of Compiz, a window manager that provides pretty visual effects, know that a lot of those effects are just for fun. Personally, I am most concerned with the Compiz plugins that add functionality to my desktop. I am going to outline some of my favorites and most useful.

Better Than Beach Reading: A Linux Starter Kit

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Linux Summer may be a time for some to lie in the hammock with a margarita, but if your inner geek is whispering "is that all there is?" over and over again, you might be ripe for a project. How about making that shift to Linux you've been dreaming about? It's fun, it's cool and -- believe us -- it's not that hard.

Kernel Log: New Nvidia drivers are still slow, Linux soon

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Software Nvidia has released new proprietary GeForce drivers; Version 173.14.12 of the drivers for x86-32 and x96-64. 2D performance problems re not addressed with this update. KDE 4 is so slow with Nvidia drivers that the desktop is not really suitabled for production use.

LiMo Foundation adds new handsets, members

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Linux Seven new mobile phones have passed the LiMo Foundation's certification process, and the group has a few new members to welcome aboard.

today's leftovers

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  • Bits from the Debian Eee PC team, summer 2008

  • Install OpenSuSE 11 independently with Accessibility support.
  • Hping
  • Free Software in the Stores
  • fluxflux-eee 2008 08 released
  • From openSUSE 11 to Debian Lenny, through bugs
  • Slackware vs Ubuntu: Old vs New
  • What is group x in /etc/group for and should I be a member?
  • Boycott Novell: Defenders of Freedom, or Offenders of Freedom?
  • The Linux Kernel Development Model
  • KDE 4.1 adoption seems high
  • Meet the people behind the Open Source Initiative (video)
  • Basics of using Screen in Linux
  • Plat’Home OpenBlockS: Made in Japan
  • SourceForge: Undervalued Open-Source Stock
  • Killing With Linux: A Primer

Can Ubuntu Linux Close the Digital Divide?

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Ubuntu Untangle is scheduled to host an Ubuntu Linux Installfest from Aug. 4 to 7 at LinuxWorld Expo in San Francisco. This latest Installfest, coupled with recent moves by Canonical and Intel made The VAR Guy wonder: Can Ubuntu Linux close the digital divide?

Mandriva Spring 2008 The New “Definitive” Linux?

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MDV I’ll just lay this out right from the beginning: Mandriva Spring 2008 Live CD is better than most other distributions fully installed. I am currently writing this blog on a laptop (that is generally flaky about Linux distributions) running the Live version of Mandriva Spring 2008. And even without installing the distribution I am very impressed. Let’s see just how this is faring.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #102

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The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #102 for the week of July 27th - August 2nd, 2008 is now available. In this Issue: QA to Launchpad Liaison, Ubuntu Stats, Steve Stalcup Interview, and Linux pre-installs rocket to 3%.

EFF releases Switzerland

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Software A NEW TOOL has been released by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, dubbed 'Switzerland'. Switzerland has been released as an open source software tool, for testing the integrity of communications over networks, ISPs and firewalls.

Microsoft's annual report: A study in open-source awareness...and ignorance

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Matt Asay: In reading through Microsoft's annual report, I am struck by how far the company has come in appreciating the threat that open source brings to Redmond. I'm also shocked by just how ill-informed the company continues to be with regard to open source as a business strategy.

Aaron Aseigo is back

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aseigo.blogspot: KDE 4.1 was released last week and there has been a lot of positive coverage in the press and the blogosphere about it. So .. The hiatus is over: I'm back.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 33

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Issue #33 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: KDE 4.1 Released With openSUSE Packages and Live CD, Help Create the Artwork for openSUSE 11.1, and Reminder: openSUSE Day at LinuxWorld Expo.

OpenGL Benchmarking On Linux Reaches New Heights

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Software There are now plenty of free software games that are available for benchmarking, but with most of them being based around the open-source Quake 3 engine, they aren't that demanding upon the graphics processor. The Phoronix Test Suite has about 70 tests and 32 suites currently, but we are always looking for new and more demanding benchmarks.


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viperx629.wordpress: I am a normal Windows Vista user so just by saying that you can probably guess this review isn’t going to be good about Ubuntu. For being free, it’s a really good OS but I’m use to all the software I can get with Vista. The only thing on my computer right now is Ubuntu and that bring me to a story…

A practical experience: Fedora vs Ubuntu

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Linux Linux is out there. In the case of some highly specialized distributions, Linux is WAY out there. Thankfully there are a number of solid disto’s that make installing and using Linux as your every-day OS fairly painless. So … Which Linux distribution is right for you?

Tasting Better With Linux

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lnxwalt.wordpress: Recently, my traveling laptop’s 512 MB of RAM proved inadequate for my use, so I purchased a replacement. The replacement came with Windows Vista and a load of garbage software–shame on you, HP–that made it almost unusable. In an effort to salvage my investment, I installed Mepis Linux 64-bit on part of the hard drive.

Notes from the Field: Installing Fedora 9 on a Dell Latitude D630

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blogbeebe.blogspot: My employer has given me a Dell Latitude D630 notebook. It came with Windows XP SP2 installed. As delivered and configured it worked like a charm. Part of my job is developing and supporting applications running on RHEL 4. I decided to install Fedora 9 on this machine.

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ARTIK is the Tizen’s Trojan Horse to dominate the IoT ecosystem

As part of the Forum “Tizen for the Internet of Things” held on September 22 in Moscow, Samsung Electronics has presented a new family of maker boards and modules named ARTIK, in addition to the infrastructure of the operating system Tizen 3.0. Samsung ARTIK’s value proposition, as declared by Samsung, is to reinvent the prototyping process by leveraging world-class data security granted by the company as well as a wide array of tools, both hardware and software, such as the ARTIK Modules and Cloud, formerly known as SmartThings Open Cloud. Read more

today's leftovers

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

  • Google Pixel review: The best Android phone, even if it is a little pricey
    Welcome to the age of Google Hardware. Apparently tired of letting third-party Android OEMs serve as the stewards of Android handsets, Google has become a hardware company. (Again). Earlier this year Google, launched a hardware division with former Motorola President Rick Osterloh at the helm. With the high-ranking title of "Senior Vice President," Osterloh doesn't oversee a side project—his group is on even footing with Android, Search, YouTube, and Ads. The hardware group is so powerful inside Google that it was able to merge Nexus, Pixel, Chromecast, OnHub, ATAP, and Glass into a single business unit. The group's coming out party was October 4, 2016, where it announced Google Home, Google Wifi, a 4K Chromecast, the Daydream VR headset, and the pair of phones we're looking at today: the Google Pixel and Google Pixel XL. The arrival of the Pixel phones marks the apparent death of the Nexus line; Google says that it has "no plans" for future Nexus devices. With the new branding comes a change in strategy, too. The Pixel brand is about making devices that are 100 percent Google, so despite Google's position as the developer of Android, get ready for Google-designed hardware combined with exclusive Google software.
  • Hands-on with the LeEco Le Pro3: services first, Android second
    LeEco’s flagship Le Pro3 smartphone isn’t trying to compete with the Google Pixel, which puts modern Google services in front of a stock Android backdrop. After playing with the Le Pro3 at the company’s U.S. launch event in San Francisco today, I’m left feeling that it’s an easy, low-cost way to get the full experience of LeEco’s applications. There are proprietary LeEco utility tools like the browser, email, calendar, messages, notes, and phone apps, along with bloatware like Yahoo Weather, but mostly the Pro3 is a means of distribution for the LeEco apps, like Live, LeVidi, and Le. There is also a standard-issue My LeEco app for managing services like EcoPass membership. Under it all is the EUI custom user interface. If you swipe left from the home screen, you see videos that LeEco recommends you watch — not Google Now.
  • Report: Google reaches agreement with CBS for 'Unplugged' web TV service - Fox and Disney may follow