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Sunday, 27 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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8 Stunning Blender Made Short Films And Animations

Filed under
Software

techdrivein.com: Blender is a free open source 3D modelling and graphics software widely used for making animated movies. Here is a nice collection of 8 short films and animations made using Blender which I think will give you an idea on Blender's capabilities.

Mid-Day US Stocks Alert

Filed under
Linux
  • Mid-Day US Stocks Alert: Red Hat Sliding
  • Jaffray Downgrades Red Hat to Neutral; Sector Call & Current Valuation

Newbie Linux management shortcut joy

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: Asking a Windows administrator to give Linux a chance as a server operating system is doubly difficult. To a Windows admin, the Linux world is a hostile place, a collection of dozens of different operating systems sharing the same basic kernel.

A Bushel of Useful Resources for Inkscape

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: If you're looking for a graphics and illustration tool that can compete with Adobe Illustrator and is especially good for logos and splashy still graphics, give Inkscape a try.

Firefox 4 may not get silent updates

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox 4 may not get silent updates after all
  • Mozilla renames Firefox 4 Beta 6 to Beta 7

Gnome-do: Open Source Software App Launcher

Filed under
Software

serverwatch.com: This week, I've been experimenting with gnome-do, the Gnome application launcher that also allows you to specify particular actions to take on whatever file or application you've found.

A Call For Open Source

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com/blog: Bloglines was my first RSS aggregator, and it will be gone on October 1st. I’d like to call on IAC and Ask.com to release bloglines to new life as an open source project.

Old School Monday: Linux Manifesto

Filed under
Linux

maximumpc.com: He's been listed as one of The 100 Most Influential Inventors of All Time, and was a 2008 inductee to the Computer History Museum.

Does the Linux desktop matter?

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com: When it all boils down, does Linux on the desktop really matter? Last week, I touched on the problems counting the number of Linux desktops, but the real question is does it really matter?

Peppermint Ice resuscitates an elderly Thinkpad

Filed under
Linux

linuxtrends.com: Bucking the trend toward ever beefier and bulkier Linux distributions, the Peppermint OS project recently unveiled the first release of a lighter-weight variant of its small-footprint Linux OS.

Reflections on Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Mark Shuttleworth: Reflections on Ubuntu, Canonical and free software
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #210
  • A Quick Look at Kubuntu 10.10

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Foobnix: A Very Interesting New Music Player
  • More Zatikon Add-On Packs Coming Soon…
  • Red Hat teases: Who is its Australian cloud customer?
  • Phase 1 Garage: The next generation of entrepreneurship
  • The Most Vulnerable and Exploitable Operating System Ever
  • Pandora Open-Source Gaming Handheld is Alive and in Demand
  • More firms opting for open source software: Is it right for you?
  • Citizen Linus
  • Apache Software Foundation announces new Executive Officers
  • Open-Source Lecture Capture
  • Year-old vulnerability endangers OpenX ad server
  • 15 minutes of fame KDE screencast
  • Ubuntu makeover paying off
  • The short stack
  • Linux 2.6.36-rc4 Brings Two Weeks Of Fixes
  • Amnesia: The Dark Descent video game review
  • Ubuntu 10.10 – Misanthropic Mongoose Tryout
  • Kobo Desktop eReader application also available for Ubuntu
  • Firefox 4 Freeze Delayed Again, Panorama Gets Big Upgrades
  • LinuxInstall.net Podcast Episode 31 -Linux and a virtualized world...

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Browsing Comfortably on KDE
  • Debian Sid gets KDE 4.5.1
  • How do we compile & execute C programs under Linux?
  • How to upgrade OpenSUSE 11.3 x64 to KDE 4.5 Stable
  • LDAP: The tool to manage enterprise infrastructure
  • How to get back missing gnome-panel icons/applets
  • Tune In. Turn On. Turn Key.
  • Build Service Cheat Sheet
  • source port routing

New app lets you watch all the big TV networks live on your PC

Filed under
Software

dvice.com: When you think of watching TV online, sites like Hulu or YouTube come to mind. You don't typically think of flipping through ABC, NBC and other channels like you would with an actual TV, but that's exactly what you can do with a new service called ivi, launching today.

Will Cisco Be the Next to Fall to Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

enterprisenetworkingplanet.com: Cisco has long dominated the networking world. It seems its supremacy is unassailable. Yet open source-based networking just might be its undoing - eventually.

Open source IQ test

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: Open source has emerged as one of the most important trends in the software industry, but myths and misconceptions about free and open source software still abound. How well do you understand the world of open source software? Take our 20-question quiz to find out.

Najarian Says Red Hat May Be Acquired

Filed under
Linux

tmcnet.com: Fast Money's Jon Najarian said there is speculation that Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) may be acquired, and as a result, its options and common stock are active today.

directions - openSUSE and Fedora

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

nowwhatthe.blogspot: Interestingly enough, in parallel to our discussion about where we're going, Fedora is also discussing strategy.

Be A Part of Linux Journal's 200th Issue!!!

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: The 200th issue of Linux Journal is just around the corner, and I thought it would be fun if all of you could participate!

The government doesn't look good naked.

Filed under
OSS

opensource.com: Open Government Directive, we seem to have a backlash. The government has spent millions of dollars collecting, organizing, and cataloging its data to make it more available to the public. An unprecedented effort. I think we can all agree that more transparency is always — always — a good thing. Not so, says Ellen Miller.

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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux on the Desktop Versus Proprietary Forms

  • Why I use a Mac computer, but an Android phone
    Yes, you could use a flavour of Linux on cheaper hardware, but then you trade the great Mac graphical interface with the ones available to Linux. You can fight me in the comments, but deep down you know I’m right. MacOS comes with Bash, and many of the tools those familiar with Linux would expect to have by default in their favourite distribution, including basics like “whois”, which aren’t installed in Windows by default.
  • Everything you knew about Chromebooks is wrong
    The original assumed vision of the Chromebook platform was a laptop and operating system capable of running only the Chrome web browser. You could do anything you wanted, as long as you wanted to stay on the web at all times. Today, the best new Chromebooks can runs apps from three additional operating systems. Not only do Chromebooks run apps, but they run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebooks can run apps from Android, Linux and Windows concurrently in the same session.
  • Games, Tests and GitLab CI
    We are getting midterm of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle and many things already happened in the Games world. I will spare the user facing news for later as today I want to tell you about development features we desperatly needed as maintainers: tests and continuous integration. TL;DR: GLib, Meson, Flatpak and GitLab CI make writing and running tests super easy!

Graphics: Vulkan and Vega M

  • Vulkan Virgl Has Kicked Off For Supporting This Graphics/Compute API Within VMs
    Of the hundreds of projects for this year's Google Summer of Code, there are many interesting GSoC 2018 projects but one of those that I am most excited for is Vulkan-Virgl for getting this modern API supported with hardware acceleration by guest virtual machines. As implied by the name, this effort is based upon the Virgl project started by David Airlie and originally tasked with getting OpenGL acceleration to guest VMs using a fully open-source Linux driver stack. Virgl has been in good shape for a while now with OpenGL, while this summer the hope is to get the Vulkan API support going for opening up VMs to using this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • AMDVLK Driver Lands Half-Float Additions, Many Other Improvements
    There's been another weekly-ish public code push to the AMDVLK open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver stack and this time around it's heavy on feature work. There has been a fair amount of changes pertaining to half-float (FP16) support including support for the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension, prepping for VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch, FP16 interpolation intrinsics and register settings, and more.
  • Vega M Graphics On Intel Kabylake G CPUs Are Beginning To Work Under Linux
    We have been covering the Linux driver upbringing of "Vega M" for the Vega/Polaris graphics found in select newer Intel "Kabylake G" processors. The code is still in flight before it will work in all released versions of the Linux driver components, but for those willing to build the code or rely upon third party repositories, Vega M is now working on Linux. As I have covered in various past articles, the open-source driver support for Radeon Vega M is queued into DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle, Mesa 18.1 albeit with new hardware I always recommend using the latest Git (current Mesa 18.2), and there are also binary GPU microcode files needed too.

Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more