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Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 07/07/2013 - 4:21pm
Blog entry Fixing OpenSuse’s Dog Awful default fonts… fieldyweb 07/07/2013 - 11:27am
Blog entry ah-ha! That's why Korora srlinuxx 1 07/07/2013 - 11:09am
Story Tired of VLC? Try MPlayer srlinuxx 07/07/2013 - 4:28am
Story No, LXDE is not Bloated srlinuxx 07/07/2013 - 4:26am
Story Fedora 19 Review: Not flashy but dependable srlinuxx 07/07/2013 - 4:25am
Story Participate in KScreen Survey: How do you setup your screen(s)? srlinuxx 07/07/2013 - 12:08am
Story Search for Unix Manual Author Halted srlinuxx 07/07/2013 - 12:05am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 06/07/2013 - 3:33am
Blog entry I'm running Mint srlinuxx 05/07/2013 - 9:10pm

Burn Your CDs and DVDs! K3b Review

Filed under
Software

vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: K3b is the KDE CD/DVD burner, capable of burning data CDs/DVDs, as well as CD/DVD ISO images, create audio CDs, rip audio CDs and video DVDs. Statistics show it is the favourite burning application of Linux users.

Compiz 0.7.6 Released

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Just shy of two months since Compiz 0.7.4 was released, Compiz 0.7.6 is now available. This update has a rewritten Place plug-in to dramatically improve multi-output behavior, configurable multi-output behavior, removed plane plug-in in favor of the wall plug-in, removed cube wallpaper painting in favor of the Compiz Fusion wallpaper plug-in, panel and desktop selection mode is now available in the switcher plug-in, and improved painting behavior.

PCMan Lightweight Alternative File Manager

Filed under
Software

tombuntu.com: PCMan File Manager (or PCManFM) is a lightweight alternative to GNOME’s Nautilus file manager or Konqueror/Dolphin in KDE. I found it to be an excellent option for more sophisticated GNOME users, as well as those with slower computers.

Slitaz Linux 20080518: Pretty, but not very useful

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Slitaz is one of an increasing number of distributions that came to me out of the blue via a random suggestion. These are quickly becoming my favorites because very often I'm pleasantly surprised by them. At just about 25 megabytes, Slitaz qualifies for the "ultra-lightweight" division.

Will we Ever Have a GPL Test Case?

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: The GNU General Public License is nearly 20 years old (version 1 came out in 1989). In that time there have been at least 100 million lawsuits filed in the US (and that's a conservative estimate). Amazingly enough, not one of those millions of court cases has actually tested the GPL's validity. How can that be - and is it a problem for the open source software movement?

Fedora Nightlife Project Harnesses Idle Computer Power

ostatic.com: Nightlife will give people the ability "to donate idle capacity from their own computers to an open, general-purpose Fedora-run grid for processing socially beneficial work and scientific research that requires access to large amounts of computing power.

Firefox takes aims at wrong record

Filed under
Moz/FF

daniweb.com/blogs: Now I am not averse to a little innovative marketing, and let's face it Mozilla and Firefox certainly know how to milk the hyperbole cow, but I cannot help but wonder if downloads in a day is the record they ought to be aiming at.

Review: Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring

Filed under
MDV

linux.com: Last month Mandriva announced its latest Spring edition. Despite a few minor glitches, after several weeks of testing the two Mandriva flavors, I have finally come across a distro that gives you the best of the GNU/Linux and proprietary worlds in terms of ease of use, range of software, and stability.

Gnome "2.24 Maybe" Apps

Filed under
Software

ibeentoubuntu.com: Right now, there are three applications proposed for the Gnome desktop which are not out of the running, but definitely aren't near crossing the finish line.

Browser faceoff: IE vs Firefox vs Opera vs Safari

Filed under
Software

zdnet.com.au: Web 2.0, with its complex sites and rich Ajax applications, is an increasingly demanding platform for a browser. In this review feature, we look at how the leading browsers measure up.

Linux filesystem defragmentation flame war

Filed under
Misc

ducea.com: Earlier this week I’ve read this article: “Defragmentation of Linux Filesystems“. The title and the headline made me interested enough, to go ahead and read it and see if there was something there to show me that linux filesystems do need defragmentation. The result was that I was not convinced at all. Still the reason for this post is not a technical one, but a human one.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • A Review of Open Office 3.0 Beta

  • Open Source Forum Shootout - bbPress
  • Three sitemap generators for WordPress
  • Trying out Linux the really easy way: VMware Player
  • Alt OS: running OpenSolaris, Syllable, and Haiku on the Eee
  • NASA taking open source into space
  • Ray Ozzie is afraid of open source, but why?
  • Get acquainted with open source analyst Raven Zachary (video)
  • Universities Embrace Open Source IT Monitoring
  • More efficient Ubuntu membership approval process
  • KDE at LinuxTag 2008 - Day 1
  • Hospital dumps Microsoft Exchange for Linux-based clone
  • The sum of Microsoft’s fears
  • Setting up Gentoo
  • Mandriva Linux Community Newsletter #128

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using NVIDIA Linux graphics drivers with Linux 2.6.25

  • Test KDE 4.1 Beta 1 with KDE4Daily
  • Ubuntu: Enabling Broadcom BCM43xx Based Wireless
  • Got Java plugin working under Ubuntu 8.04
  • Display a calendar in UNIX
  • Recovering Ubuntu after installing Windows
  • Simple Shell One-Liner To Enumerate File Types In Linux and Unix

2008 Fav Desktop

KDE
46% (698 votes)
GNOME
39% (588 votes)
XFCE
6% (87 votes)
Enlightenment
3% (43 votes)
*box
4% (53 votes)
other
2% (33 votes)
Total votes: 1502

Forget the Heron; what's new in Ubuntu's Intrepid Ibex?

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Ubuntu, arguably the most popular Linux distribution today, came out with its 8.04 release last month, dubbed Hardy Heron. That's passé now; here’s the low down on what the future holds this October with Ubuntu 8.10, Intrepid Ibex.

The Shuttleworth Foundation Supports South Africa's Appeal Against OOXML

Filed under
OSS

groklaw.net: The Shuttleworth Foundation has sent out a press relase explaining what it believes is wrong with OOXML as a standard, and stating its conviction that the the South Africa Bureau of Standards has a strong case for appeal.

KDE 4.1: Have it Our Way

Filed under
KDE

practical-tech.com: Over the years, I’ve grown quite fond of KDE for my Linux desktops. To me, it offered the right combination of ease of use and access to Linux’s power-user resources. Now, though, one of the forthcoming changes in KDE 5.1 is already annoying me and it’s barely in beta.

GNOME 2.22.2 Released

Filed under
Software

This is the second update to GNOME 2.22. Come and see all the bug fixing,
all the new translations and all the updated documentation brought to
you by the wonderful team of GNOME contributors! A lot of work has been
done in the stable branch to make it even more solid than it was.

Low-cost Linux laptop targets British schools

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

desktoplinux.com: Elonex is taking orders for a sub-$200 Linux-based laptop aimed at the British educational market. Based on a 300MHz processor, likely ARM-based, the Elonex One includes WiFi, Ethernet, Flash storage, USB, and a 7-inch, 800 x 480 detachable touch display.

Banshee learns to sing

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: We've always been fond of Amarok. We recently discovered a contender to the title of most loved Linux media player, the ominously named Banshee. Fortunately, Banshee doesn't involve listening to shrieking demons, unless that's your genre of choice.

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More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • OpenSSL 1.1.0 Series Release Notes
  • Linux.PNScan Malware Brute-Forces Linux-Based Routers
  • St. Jude stock shorted on heart device hacking fears; shares drop
    The stock of pacemaker manufacturer St. Jude Medical Inc (STJ.N) fell sharply on Thursday after short-selling firm Muddy Waters said it had placed a bet that the shares would fall, claiming its implanted heart devices were vulnerable to cyber attacks. St. Jude, which agreed in April to sell itself for $25 billion to Abbott Laboratories (ABT.N), said the allegations were false. St Jude shares closed down 4.96 percent, the biggest one-day fall in 7 months and at a 7.4 percent discount to Abbott's takeover offer. Muddy Waters head Carson Block said the firm's position was motivated by research from a cyber security firm, MedSec Holdings Inc, which has a financial arrangement with Muddy Waters. MedSec asserted that St. Jude's heart devices were vulnerable to cyber attack and were a risk to patients.
  • BlackArch Linux ISO now comes with over 1,500 hacking tools
    On a move to counter distros like Kali Linux and BackBox, BlackArch has got a new ISO image that includes more than 1,500 hacking tools. The update also brings several security and software tweaks to deliver an enhanced platform for various penetration testing and security assessment activities. The new BlackArch Linux ISO includes an all new Linux installer and more than 100 new penetration testing and hacking tools. There is also Linux 4.7.1 to fix the bugs and compatibility issues of the previous kernel. Additionally, the BlackArch team has updated all its in-house tools and system packages as well as updated menu entries for the Openbox, Fluxbox and Awesome windows managers.

Server Administration

  • Big Blue Aims For The Sky With Power9
    Intel has the kind of control in the datacenter that only one vendor in the history of data processing has ever enjoyed. That other company is, of course, IBM, and Big Blue wants to take back some of the real estate it lost in the datacenters of the world in the past twenty years. The Power9 chip, unveiled at the Hot Chips conference this week, is the best chance the company has had to make some share gains against X86 processors since the Power4 chip came out a decade and a half ago and set IBM on the path to dominance in the RISC/Unix market. IBM laid out a roadmap out past 2020 for its Power family of processors back at the OpenPower Summit in early April, demonstrating its commitment the CPU market with chips that are offer a brawny alternative to CPUs and accelerators compared to the Xeon and Xeon Phi alternatives from Intel and the relatively less brawny chips from ARM server chip makers such as Applied Micro and Cavium and the expected products from AMD, Broadcom, and Qualcomm. We pondered IBM’s prospects in the datacenter in the wake of some details coming out about next year’s Power9 processors, which IBM said at the time would come in two flavors, one aimed at scale-out machines with one or two sockets and another aimed at scale up machines with NUMA architectures and lots of sockets and shared memory.
  • ARM Announces ARM v8-A with Scalable Vector Extensions: Aiming for HPC and Data Center
    Today ARM is announcing an update to their line of architecture license products. With the goal of moving ARM more into the server, the data center, and high-performance computing, the new license add-on tackles a fundamental data center and HPC issue: vector compute. ARM v8-A with Scalable Vector Extensions won’t be part of any ARM microarchitecture license today, but for the semiconductor companies that build their own cores with the instruction set, this could see ARM move up into the HPC markets. Fujitsu is the first public licensee on board, with plans to include ARM v8-A cores with SVE in the Post-K RIKEN supercomputer in 2020.
  • The Sad State of Docker
    I have always been a big fan of Docker. This is very visible if you regularly read this blog. However, I am very disappointed lately how Docker handled the 1.12 release. I like to think of version 1.12 as a great proof of concept that should not have received the amount of attention that it already received. Let’s dive deep into what I found wrong. First, I do not think a company should market and promote exciting new features that have not been tested well. Every time Docker makes an announcement, the news spreads like a virus to blogs and news sites all over the globe. Tech blogs will basically copy and paste the exact same procedure that Docker discussed into a new blog post as if they were creating original content. This cycle repeats over and over again and becomes annoying because I am seeing the same story a million times. What I hate most about these recent redundant articles is that the features do not work as well as what is written about them.
  • Containers debunked: DevOps, security and why containers will not replace virtual machines
    The tech industry is full of exciting trends that promise to change the face of the industry and business as we know it, but one that is gaining a huge amount of focus is containers. However, problems lie with the technology and threaten to root itself deep in the mythology about it, namely the misconceptions over what the technology is, what can be done with it, and the idea that they replace virtual machines. Lars Herrmann, GM, Integrated Solutions at Red Hat spoke to CBR about five common misconceptions, but first the benefits. Herrmann, said: “Containerisation can be an amazingly efficient way to do DevOps, so it’s a very practical way to get into a DevOps methodology and process inside an organisation, which is highly required in a lot of organisations because of the benefits in agility to be able to release software faster, better, and deliver more value.”
  • Rackspace Going Private after $4.3 Billion Buyout
    The company released Rackspace Private Cloud powered by Red Hat in February. Using the Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform, the product helped extend Rackspace's OpenStack-as-a-service product slate.
  • SoylentNews' Folding@Home Team is Now in the Top 500 in the World
    It has only been six short months since SoylentNews' Folding@Home team was founded, and we've made a major milestone: our team is now one of the top 500 teams in the world! We've already surpassed some heavy hitters like /. and several universities, including MIT. (But now is not the time to rest on our laurels. A certain Redmond-based software producer currently occupies #442.) In case you aren't familiar with folding@home, it's a distributed computing project that simulates protein folding in an attempt to better understand diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's and thereby help to find a cure. To that end, SoylentNews' team has completed nearly 16,000 work units.

Games for GNU/Linux

Leftovers: Software

  • SDDM 0.14.0
  • Kodi v17 “Krypton” Beta 1
  • Top 10 Time Tracking Software for Linux
    Just a few days ago we were presenting software for one of the most popular mainstream Linux distribution – Ubuntu. Now let’s cover the progenitor of all free and open-source software. Its operating system was released on October 5, 1991. The creator of Linux, Linus Torvalds, was only 22 years old at that time! Linux is not very popular on the desktop computers (at least among regular users, software engineers, for example, prefer to work on it), but it is the leading operating system on servers, mainframe computers, and virtually all fastest supercomputers. It is also worth mentioning that without Linux there won’t be no Android as we know it now, no network routers, video game consoles, and smartwatches. We really owe a lot to Mr. Linus. According to Wikipedia, the development of Linux is one of the most prominent examples of free and open-source software collaboration. Its source code may be used, modified and distributed—commercially or non-commercially—by anyone under the terms of its respective licenses. Thanks to it we can use some great software like the already mentioned Ubuntu, but also Fedora, Gentoo Linux, Debian and more.
  • MPTCP v0.91 Release
    The MPTCP v0.91 release is based on the Linux Kernel Longterm Support release v4.1.x.
  • Quick Updates: Guake 0.8.7, WebTorrent Desktop 0.12.0, TLP 0.9
    Guake is a drop-down terminal emulator for GNOME (GTK2). The application is inspired from consoles in computer games, such as Quake, in which the console slides from the top of the screen when a key is pressed. In the same way, Guake can be invoked and hidden using a single key (though Guake can also automatically hide when it loses focus).
  • Switch Between Multiple Lists Of Apps Pinned To Unity Launcher With `Launcher List Indicator`
  • MATE Dock Applet Gets Unity-Like Progress Bar And Badge Support
    MATE Dock Applet is a MATE Panel applet that displays running application windows as icons. The applet features options to pin applications to the dock, supports multiple workspaces, and can be added to any MATE Panel, regardless of size and orientation.
  • AppImage – One app framework to distro them all
    Linux is highly portable. Fact. On the other hand, Linux software is the least portable technology in the world. Try running Firefox designed for Debian on Fedora. In fact, try running Firefox designed for one version of Fedora on another Fedora, perhaps a slightly older version. Godspeed, Captain Jack Sparrow. The fanatical rigor with which the Linux backward compatibility is maintained in the enterprise flavors, SUSE and Red Hat, is inversely proportional to all other incompatibilities that exist in the Linux space. This ain’t no news. I have most artfully elaborated on this problem in my illustrated Linux guide. But now, there’s a thing that promises to solve all these problems forever. AppImage.
  • Substance Designer 5.5 Is Here
    This version takes texture creation into the big leagues with MDL material authoring – opening up a whole new world of materials – plus Linux support, fbx camera import and support for VCA. This is a free upgrade for license holders and Substance Live subscribers, or you can get a free 30-day trial version.