Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 04 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Jolla Releases Its "Ohijärvi" Sailfish Linux Update Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2014 - 4:32pm
Story KDE wins Linux New Media Readers Choice Award 2014 Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2014 - 4:25pm
Story New in GTK+ 3.12: popovers Rianne Schestowitz 18/03/2014 - 2:45pm
Story The easiest way to turn your app idea into an appliance Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2014 - 11:54am
Story TN state departments asked to switch over to open source software Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2014 - 11:49am
Story Open source forum 2014, a first Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2014 - 11:48am
Story Decking Out Linux for the Senior Set Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2014 - 11:45am
Story ACPI, firmware and your security Rianne Schestowitz 18/03/2014 - 9:33am
Story Nixed, Seniors, and Networking Basics Rianne Schestowitz 18/03/2014 - 9:02am
Story Geeksphone’s Revolution to offer Ubuntu Touch: Report Rianne Schestowitz 18/03/2014 - 8:49am

sound in mandriva 2009.0

Filed under
MDV

colin.guthr.ie: 2008.1 went well and the decision to default to using PulseAudio turned out to be pretty good all in all. I made it my mission to ensure that we had as smooth as possible an integration and have continued to follow up as many bug reports as my time permits. Anyway, what about 2009?

GNOME 2.24 released, mobile development platform emerges

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The open source GNOME desktop environment got a big boost today with the release of version 2.24. The latest version brings some new applications and a wide range of improvements for developers and end users. This is also the first version of GNOME to be released with an accompanying mobile development platform.

Improving Ubuntu/Upstream Bug Workflow

Filed under
Ubuntu

jonobacon.org: Today we launched the beta of our Ubuntu Upstream Report. Jorge has more details on how upstreams and Ubuntu contributors can make use of the report, but I wanted to spend a few moments telling the story behind the report.

Xubuntu Intrepid Ibex 8.10 Alpha 6 Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

penguinway.net: Alpha 6 is the last alpha release of Xubuntu Intrepid Ibex 8.10. I wanted to give it a try on my Dell Inspiron 1150 notebook to see how far it had come along.

Italian LUG turns Pakistani school into a educational model

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: The students of a missionary school in Pakistan, from first graders to graduates, have become enthusiast Edubuntu users thanks to the cooperation between their administrator and an Italian LUG.

Linux Foundation Statement on IBM IT Standards Policy

Filed under
OSS

Jim Zemlin: Yesterday, Linux Foundation member IBM announced its adoption of a new corporate policy that will govern its global participation in the standards development process. The Linux Foundation applauds this action, and supports IBM’s call for raising the bar in the standards development process.

gOS 3.0 goes gold

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.com/: Good OS (gOS) has achieved a new major release of its Ubuntu-based operating system. Targeting low-powered netbooks, gOS 3.0 integrates closely with Google Gadgets, as well as with Google Mail, Calendar, Reader, News, Applications, and so on.

Where Windows is #2 to Linux

Filed under
OS

blogs.computerworld: Microsoft encourages us to think of Linux, when we think of it as all, as an also-ran operating systems for nerds. The last thing Microsoft wants us to think about is that there are some spaces where Microsoft is a distant number two and Linux is on top.

Lessons learned from five years of Fedora

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: The Fedora Project is celebrating its fifth birthday today. Congrats, Fedora! It seems like just yesterday I was covering the first release to see how (or if) Fedora would distinguish itself from Red Hat Linux.

Epiphany, the ultimate Gnome browser

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Firefox is a great browser. However, it’s a tad on the bloated side (even though the new version are definitely better!). Also, Firefox is focused on cross-platform compatibility. That’s great, but sometimes that also means that Firefox won’t be able to take advantage of Gnome-specific features, including the unified look, better language support, and HIG-compliant settings. If you’ve been feeling these Firefox blues as well, Epiphany could be the answer.

PowerDVD Linux – expensive, but works

Filed under
Software

venturecake.com: PowerDVD Linux has been around for years. Originally sold only to embedded Linux developers, the software made its way onto the desktop by being included by hardware makers in Dell’s Ubuntu laptops and more recently Asus eeePCs. The software is now finally available to the general Ubuntu-using public via The Ubuntu Store.

Flock: Firefox's Social Cousin

Filed under
Software

linuxinsider.com: Think of Flock as the social-butterfly cousin of the hard-working Firefox browser. Both spring from the same code base, though Flock has been designed from the ground up with social networking in mind. It taps RSS feeds and makes blogging easier and less time-consuming.

Linux On a Nutshell

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: You have five minutes and ten sentences to explain Linux to a complete newbie, without the geekery mumbo jumbo. What would you say? Here is my take:

A Gloomy Vista for Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

newsweek.com: Last year I was meeting with the CEO of a PC company who offered to give me a demo of his company's gorgeous new top-of- the-line notebook loaded with Windows Vista. He flipped open the laptop, pressed the power button, and … nothing. We waited. And waited. It was excruciating.

Is Sun Solaris on its deathbed?

Filed under
OS

infoworld.com: Linux is enjoying growth, with a contingent of devotees too large to be called a cult following at this point. Solaris, meanwhile, has thrived as a longstanding, primary Unix platform geared to enterprises. But with Linux the object of all the buzz in the industry, can Sun's rival Solaris Unix OS hang on, or is it destined to be displaced by Linux altogether?

A Distribution, an Audience, and the Passage of Time

Filed under
Gentoo

ostatic.com: Gentoo Linux has had a rough time of it the last few years. Matt Asay at CNET suspects Ubuntu's rising star is responsible. Having used both distributions extensively, and strongly preferring one, I agree with Asay. However, an average Gentoo user is usually not asking the same from his machine as a typical Ubuntu user.

Linux is not always right

Filed under
Linux

debiantoday.com: Debian along with most Linux distributions are based on free and open source software (FOSS). Debian specifically is a front runner in the freedom game. FOSS is great, I love it. As much as I love FOSS I value my freedom of choice in what I do on my computer and in my daily life much more than free software.

Open Source Bloggers Don't Let the Facts Confuse Them

Filed under
OSS

seekingalpha.com: The open source blogosphere is up in arms again with its typical “don’t-let-the-facts-get-in-the-way” postings against Microsoft (MSFT). This time Microsoft’s co-conspirators are the Stanford and Harvard business schools because two of their professors did a “study (of) how a commercial firm competes with a free open source product.

Bloatware in a FOSS world

Filed under
OSS

raiden.net: Bloatware: the state of a program in which the software becomes so large, inefficient and cumbersome that it's more of a pain to use than a joy. And despite all that people in the FOSS community claim about open source software, FOSS bloatware is a comin', and there's nothing you can do about it. Or is there?

Mini-Notebook Mania, Part 1

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

pcworld.com: These ultra-compact portables have become hot sellers since Asus introduced its first Eee PC last fall. How do these new ultra-compact laptops differ from traditional models?

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Hyper Is a Terminal Emulator Built Using Web Technologies
    A lot of us use the terminal on Ubuntu, typically from an app like GNOME Terminal, Xterm or an app like Guake. But did you know that there’s an JS/HTML/CSS Terminal? It’s called Hyper (formerly/also known as HyperTerm, though it has no relation to the Windows terminal of the same/similar name) and, usefulness aside, it’s certainl a novel proof-of-concept. “The goal of the project,” according to the official website, “is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards.”
  • Little Kids Having Fun With “Terminal Train” In Ubuntu Linux
    Linux is often stereotyped as the operating system for tech savvy users and developers. However, there are some fun Linux commands that one can use in spare time. A small utility named sl can be installed in Linux to play with the Terminal Train.
  • This Cool 8-Bit Desktop Wallpaper Changes Throughout The Day
    Do you want a dynamic desktop wallpaper that changes throughout the day and looks like the sort of environment you’d be able to catchPokemon in? If so, check out Bit Day wallpapers. Created by Redditor user ~BloodyMarvelous, Bit Day is a collection of 12 high-resolution pixel art wallpapers.
  • This Script Sets Wallpapers from Imgur As Your Desktop Background
    Pyckground is a simple python script that can fetch a new desktop background on the Cinnamon desktop from any Imgur gallery you want. I came across it while doing a bit of background on the Bit Day wallpaper pack, and though it was nifty enough to be of use to some of you. So how does it work?
  • Productivity++
    In keeping with tradition of LTS aftermaths, the upcoming Plasma 5.9 release – the next feature release after our first Long Term Support Edition – will be packed with lots of goodies to help you get even more productive with Plasma!
  • Core Apps Hackfest 2016: report
    I spent last weekend at the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. The agenda was to work on GNOME’s core applications: Documents, Files, Music, Photos, Videos, Usage, etc.; to raise their overall standard and to make them push beyond the limits of the framework. There were 19 of us and among us we covered a wide range of modules and areas of expertise. I spent most of my time on the plumbing necessary for Documents and Photos to use GtkFlowBox and GtkListBox. The innards of Photos had already been overhauled to reduce its dependency on GtkTreeModel. Going into the hackfest we were sorely lacking a widget that had all the bells and whistles we need — the idiomatic GNOME 3 selection mode, and seamlessly switching between a list and grid view. So, this is where I decided to focus my energy. As a result, we now have a work-in-progress GdMainBox widget in libgd to replace the old GtkIconView/GtkTreeView-based GdMainView.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Did Amazon Just Kill Open Source?
    Back in the days, we used to focus on creating modular architectures. We had standard wire protocols like NFS, RPC, etc. and standard API layers like BSD, POSIX, etc. Those were fun days. You could buy products from different vendors, they actually worked well together and were interchangeable. There were always open source implementations of the standard, but people could also build commercial variations to extend functionality or durability. The most successful open source project is Linux. We tend to forget it has very strict APIs and layers. New kernel implementations must often be backed by official standards (USB, SCSI…). Open source and commercial implementations live happily side by side in Linux. If we contrast Linux with the state of open source today, we see so many implementations which overlap. Take the big data eco-systems as an example: in most cases there are no standard APIs, or layers, not to mention standard wire protocols. Projects are not interchangeable, causing a much worse lock-in than when using commercial products which conform to a common standard.
  • Firebird 3 by default in LibreOffice 5.4 (Base)
    Lots of missing features & big bugs were fixed recently . All of the blockers that were initially mentioned on tracking bug are now fixed.
  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Comma.ai, Patches For Firefox and Tor, And OSS-Fuzz
  • Open Source Malaria helps students with proof of concept toxoplasmosis pill
    A team of Australian student researchers at Sydney Grammar School has managed to recreate the formula for Daraprim, the drug made (in)famous by the actions of Turing Pharmaceuticals last year when it increased the price substantially per pill. According to Futurism, the undertaking was helped along by an, “online research-sharing platform called Open Source Malaria [OSM], which aims to use publicly available drugs and medical techniques to treat malaria.” The students’ pill passed a battery of tests for purity, and ultimately cost $2 using different, more readily available components. It shows the potential of the platform, which has said elsewhere there is, “enormous potential to crowdsource new potential medicines efficiently.” Although Daraprim is already around, that it could be synthesized relatively easily without the same materials as usual is a good sign for OSM.
  • Growing the Duke University eNable chapter
    We started the Duke University eNable chapter with the simple mission of providing amputees in the Durham area of North Carolina with alternative prostheses, free of cost. Our chapter is a completely student-run organization that aims to connect amputees with 3D printed prosthetic devices. We are partnered with the Enable Community Foundation (ECF), a non-profit prosthetics organization that works with prosthetists to design and fit 3D printed prosthetic devices on amputees who are in underserved communities. As an official ECF University Chapter, we represent the organization in recipient outreach, and utilize their open sourced designs for prosthetic devices.

today's howtos