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Tuesday, 16 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story SourceForge commits reputational suicide Rianne Schestowitz 02/06/2015 - 7:26pm
Story Nintendo Nixes Android Rumors Roy Schestowitz 02/06/2015 - 7:25pm
Story First Open Automotive Grade Linux Spec Released Rianne Schestowitz 02/06/2015 - 7:20pm
Story Qt 5.4.2 Released Rianne Schestowitz 02/06/2015 - 7:16pm
Story diet4j: run Maven modules directly, and avoid gigantic JARs and WARs j12t 02/06/2015 - 6:35pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 02/06/2015 - 1:13pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 02/06/2015 - 1:11pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 02/06/2015 - 1:10pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 02/06/2015 - 1:01pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 02/06/2015 - 12:59pm

Are these the last days of Novell?

Filed under
SUSE
  • Are these the last days of Novell as we know it?
  • Why Microsoft Can’t Afford To Let Novell Die

Swiftfox: a fast Firefox alternative for Linux users

Filed under
Software

linuxcritic.wordpress: In my ongoing search to find the perfect browser, I’ve generally stuck to Opera for the past several years, on Windows and on Linux. Well, today, I’m here to report that this situation might well have changed, due to something called Swiftfox.

Google pumps out Chrome build which knows where you are

Filed under
Google
Software
  • Google pumps out Chrome build which knows where you are
  • Google open source guru says Android code will be in Linux kernel in time
  • Friday Fun: Play 3D Rally Racing in Chrome

Ubuntu 10.10 To Be Released on 28th of October

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 10.10 To Be Released on 28th of October
  • Ubuntu Should Block User Choices
  • Hands-on: a close look at Ubuntu's new non-brown theme
  • What Can Less Brown Do For You?
  • Short: New in Lucid
  • 6 little things in Ubuntu 10.04 that I love
  • Is Ubuntu ready to run your business servers?
  • The Linux Desktop Will Have Its Day: Q&A With Mark Shuttleworth

Be Afraid if Someone's Got a Voltmeter Hooked to Your CPU

Filed under
OSS
Security

ebb.org/bkuhn/blog: I had a hunch what was going on. I quickly downloaded a copy of the academic paper that was cited as the sole source for the story and read it. As I feared, OpenSSL was getting some bad press unfairly.

Try the Linux desktop of the future

Filed under
Linux
Software

tuxradar.com: For the tinkerers and testers, 2010 is shaping up to be a perfect year. Take a trip with us on a voyage of discovery to find out exactly what's happening and how the Linux desktop experience is likely to evolve over the next 12 months...

Red Hat extends Szulik's time as chairman

Filed under
Linux

newsobserver.com: Red Hat is keeping Matthew Szulik around at least a little longer. The Raleigh-based software company has agreed to extend Szulik's term as chairman for another year, until Feb. 28, 2011.

BBC claims angry iPlayer plugin mob 'conflated' open source term

Filed under
Software
Web

theregister.co.uk: The BBC has tried to draw a line under its decision to bar open source implementations of RTMP (real-time messaging protocol) streaming in the iPlayer, after The Register revealed the Corporation's quiet switcheroo last week.

Contributing Upstream

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Ubuntu

lxer.com: The foundations of Linux, with how it has been developed and when we look at the Debian model on which Ubuntu is based, the contributions of developers by and large are because of their common interests and a willingness to accept conceptualizations.

Igelle DSV: A New Fast Lightweight Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

linuxplanet.com: Building a Linux distribution with the novice user in mind has been tried many times over the years. If you had to pick one area where many new users struggle, it would have to be installing new applications. Missing dependencies or improperly configured repositories lead to frustration and, ultimately, abandonment of the entire platform.

SimplyMEPIS 8.5 RC2 is Available

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: Warren Woodford has released SimplyMEPIS 8.4.99, RC2 of MEPIS 8.5, now available from MEPIS and public mirrors.

Linux Video Editing with Openshot

Filed under
Software

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Openshot is a non-linear video editor for the Linux operating system. It is designed to be easy to use, but powerful at the same time.

Elive 2.0 Released into the Wild

Filed under
Linux
  • Distribution Release: Elive 2.0
  • Elive Topaz 2.0 Homepage
  • Elive 2.0 Released into the Wild
  • Elive 2.0 Stable Finally Released

PC-BSD 8.0 vs. Kubuntu 9.10 Benchmarks

Filed under
BSD
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: PC-BSD 8.0 was released last week and we took this opportunity to deliver a fresh set of *BSD benchmarks. In this article we have benchmarks of PC-BSD 8.0 x64 against Kubuntu 9.10 x86_64.

You Can Finally 'Taste' The Ubuntu 10.04 Light (Radiance) And Dark (Ambiance) Themes For Yourself

Filed under
Ubuntu

The new Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lunx themes have landed: the Light and Dark themes are now available for all. The themes are called Ambiance (dark) and Radiance (light). The post includes download links for the new themes so Ubuntu Karmic users can also enjoy these beautiful new themes.

Full story

today's leftovers, part 2:

Filed under
News
  • A 2D GTK Window Decorator in Compiz
  • Arch Linux Reviewed
  • Choices Choices...
  • 20 Reasons Why Oracle is the World's Largest OSS Company
  • Do you know Ubuntu Games?
  • The road back to par: Radical changes for Firefox 4.0
  • MeeGo Linux for netbooks coming this month
  • Electric Green School motorcycle runs Linux
  • Rebranding OpenOffice.org
  • Google says PCs will be dead in three years
  • Little Things That Matter: Rhythmbox Indicator Applet
  • Would You Like To Help The NEW PCLinuxOS Magazine?
  • Unite Media Player, A Widget for Opera
  • Earthquake in Chile Shortened Day, Shifted Axis, NASA Says
  • The Linux Link Tech Show #343 3/3/10

today's leftovers, part 1:

Filed under
News
  • The Uniform Driver Interface—why wasn’t it adopted?
  • Selective Disclosure, At Last?
  • Evolution of GNU/Linux system..must read for Linux newbies
  • Shiney new PHP for 10.04
  • Klavaro - A very flexible touch typing tutor
  • LA Funds Important Legal Research on Free Software Compliance
  • Ubuntu CEO Silber Pushes Retail Ubuntu
  • 5 open source and free software books that are worth your time
  • Linux Learning Centers Growing in Central Texas
  • Download wineasio .deb packages
  • Psion Launches the New Workabout Pro 3
  • It’s Crazy Ass Rumor Thursday: Whispers On RHT
  • Options Intelligence Report: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Which white knight will save Novell?
  • Unintended Consequences: Twelve Years Under the DMCA

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to convert RPM software packages to Debian (.deb)
  • Free GIMP Button Brushes
  • Formatting OpenOffice spreadsheet cells with DD/MM/YY
  • Subversion self tutorial
  • Using Restrictive Constructors in PHP 5
  • How to configure Compiz in Elive
  • How to create audio cd in Ubuntu using Brasero
  • Beginner's Guide to Nmap
  • Remmina-free and open-source Remote Desktop Client written in GTK+
  • How to view the contents of an initrd image
  • Run GlassFish V3 As a Non-Root Service on Gentoo Linux
  • Q-Tips: Speeding up Gentoo Compile Times

Musings on Software Freedom for Mobile Devices

Filed under
OSS

ebb.org/bkuhn/blog: I started using GNU/Linux and Free Software in 1992. In those days, while everything I needed for a working computer was generally available in software freedom, there were many components and applications that simply did not exist.

Hear that Mozilla Drumbeat? No, Me Neither

Filed under
Moz/FF

opendotdotdot.blogspot: A few months ago, I wrote about Mozilla's new Drumbeat campaign, "a global community of people and projects using technology to help internet users understand, participate and take control of their online lives."

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More in Tux Machines

Browsers: Mozilla Firefox and Bromite

  • Firefox 60 Product Integrity Requests Report
    Late last year I was putting out weekly reports on the number of requests Mozilla’s Product Integrity group was receiving and how well we were tracking toward our self-imposed service-level agreement (respond to 90% within 48 hours). The initial system we set up was only ever intended to be minimally viable and has not scaled well, although that’s probably to be expected. There’s been quite a lot of growing pains so I’ve been tasked with taking it to the next level.
  • Tab Warming: How Firefox Will Improve Web Browsing Experience? How To Get It Now?
    Mozilla developer Mike Conley described the details about Tab Warming in a post on his personal blog. It will improve tab switching by pre-loading the contents of a tab before it gets displayed in front of the users.
  • Bromite Is the New NoChromo — Open Source Chrome Port with Ad Blocking
    A while back, we told you about NoChromo, a no-root ad-blocking browser based on Google Chrome's open source code base, Chromium. That browser was wildly successful, as it offered an identical interface to regular Chrome, but without any ads. Sadly, the developer abandoned NoChromo, but a new ad-blocking Chromium port called Bromite has been released to fill its void.

GNOME: GNOME Shell, Bug Tracking, GXml

  • How to Install GNOME Shell Extensions GUI / CLI
    GNOME Shell extensions are small and lightweight pieces of codes that enhance GNOME desktop’s functionality and improves the user experience. They are the equivalent of add-ons in your browser. For instance, you can have add-ons that download videos like IDM downloader or block annoying ads such as Adblocker. Similarly, GNOME extensions perform certain tasks e.g. Display weather and geolocation. One of the tools used to install and customize GNOME Shell extensions is the GNOME tweak tool. It comes pre-installed in the latest Linux distributions. This article we cover how to install GNOME Shell extensions from GUI and from the command line on various Linux distros.
  • Musings on bug trackers
    I love bugzilla, I really do. I’ve used it nearly my entire career in free software. I know it well, I like the command line tool integration. But I’ve never had a day in bugzilla where I managed to resolve/triage/close nearly 100 issues. I managed to do that today with our gitlab instance and I didn’t even mean to.
  • ABI stability for GXml
    I’m taking a deep travel across Vala code; trying to figure out how things work. With my resent work on abstract methods for compact classes, may I have an idea on how to provide ABI stability to GXml. GXml have lot of interfaces for DOM4, implemented in classes, like Gom* series. But they are a lot, so go for each and add annotations, like Gee did, to improve ABI, is a hard work.

More on Barcelona Moving to Free Software

  • Barcelona Aims To Oust Microsoft In Open Source Drive
    The city of Barcelona has embarked on an ambitious open source effort aimed at reducing its dependence on large proprietary software vendors such as Microsoft, including the replacement of both applications and operating systems.
  • Barcelona to ditch Microsoft software for open source software
    Barcelona, one of the most popular cities in the Europe is now switching to open-source software by replacing Microsoft Windows, Office and Exchange with Linux, Libre Office and Open Xchange respectively. The city council is already piloting the use of Ubuntu Linux desktops along with Mozilla Firefox as the default browser. With this move, Barcelona city is planning to save money over the years by reducing software/service licensing fees. They are also planning to hire new developers to write open-source software. The open-source product will also be made available to other Spanish municipalities and public bodies further afield allowing them the opportunity to save money on software licences.
  • Barcelona to ditch Microsoft in favour of open source Linux software
    Catalan capital Barcelona is planning to ditch proprietary software products from Microsoft in favour of free, open source alternatives such as Open-Xchange email. That’s according to a report by Spain's national paper El Pais, which reports that Barcelona plans to invest 70% of its annual software budget in open source this year.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open Source turns 20
    While open source software is ubiquitous, recognized across industries as a fundamental infrastructure component as well as a critical factor for driving innovation, the "open source" label was coined only 20 years ago. The concept of open source software - as opposed to free software or freeware - is credited to Netscape which, in January 1998, announced plans to release the source code of its proprietary browser, Navigator, under a license that would freely permit modification and redistribution. This code is today the basis for Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird. The Open Source Initiative (OSI) regards that event as the point at which "software freedom extended its reach beyond the enthusiast community and began its ascent into the mainstream".
  • Coreboot 4.7 Released With 47 More Motherboards Supported, AMD Stoney Ridge
    Coreboot 4.7 is now available as the latest release of this free and open-source BIOS/UEFI replacement. Coreboot 4.7 is the latest tagged release for this project developed via Git. This release has initial support for AMD Stoney Ridge platforms, Intel ICH10 Southbridge support, Intel Denverton/Denverton-NS platform support, and initial work on supporting next-gen Intel Cannonlake platforms.
  • Thank you CUSEC!
    Last week, I spoke at CUSEC (Canadian Undergraduate Software Engineering Conference) in Montreal.   I really enjoy speaking with students and learning what they are working on.  They are the future of our industry!  I was so impressed by the level of organization and the kindness and thoughtfulness of the CUSEC organizing committee who were all students from various universities across Canada. I hope that you all are enjoying some much needed rest after your tremendous work in the months approaching the conference and last week.
  • Percona Announces Sneak Peek of Conference Breakout Sessions for Seventh Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference
  • The Universal Donor
    A few people reacted negatively to my article on why Public Domain software is broadly unsuitable for inclusion in a community open source project. Most argued that because public domain gave them the rights they need where they live (mostly the USA), I should not say it was wrong to use it. That demonstrates either parochialism or a misunderstanding of what public domain really means. It should not be used for the same reason code known to be subject to software patents should not be used — namely that only code that, to the best efforts possible, can be used by anyone, anywhere without the need to ask permission (e.g. by buying a patent license) or check it it’s needed (e.g. is that PD code PD here?) can be used in an open source project. Public domain fails the test for multiple reasons: global differences in copyright term, copyright as an unalienable moral rather than as a property right, and more. Yes, public domain may give you the rights you need. But in an open source project, it’s not enough for you to determine you personally have the rights you need. In order to function, every user and contributor of the project needs prior confidence they can use, improve and share the code, regardless of their location or the use to which they put it. That confidence also has to extend to their colleagues, customers and community as well.