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Thursday, 23 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Are Linux Users Just Penny Pinchers?

Filed under
Linux

tech-itch.com: I think it’s unfair to base an argument solely around price. Many a Linux user can afford the money to set up a Windows machine, I’m not sure on the stats but I’ll wager many a user will dual boot in one form or another. I, for example, work in Linux wheras for my home/personal use I boot to Windows more often as I game and use Windows only DAWs.

Noteworthy Mdv Cooker changes 21 dec – 31 dec

Filed under
MDV

artipc10.vub.ac.be: In spite of the holiday season, lots of new packages continue to trickle in Mandriva Cooker. Amongst the many updates, here is an overview of some important changes:

A Look Back At Docky in 2009

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: As with a few other of my favourite Linux applications, Docky has an incredibly insightful and focused team who hare a passion for making Docky awesome – as proven by its breathtakingly fast development speed! So, to Docky – my favourite application of 2009!

2010 - A Linux Odyssey

Filed under
Linux
  • 2010 - A Linux Odyssey
  • Open source predictions for 2010
  • 2010 as the year of Linux on the desktop – does it really matter?

The Meaning of ’su’

pthree.org: When I taught for Guru Labs, part of the students training was covering different ways of becoming the root user, such as using “su”, “sudo” and taking advantage of the wheel group. So, what does “su” mean?

GNOME needs to get its act together

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: As the year ends, it is fair to say there have been many free and open source software organisations that have made rapid strides, not merely in 2009 but right through the noughties. But one organisation badly needs to get its act together.

Linux on the cusp of 2010

Filed under
Linux

limulus.wordpress: We’re almost at 2010 and so I thought I’d revisit my 2010: The year of the Linux Desktop post. But rather than start with Linux, I want to start with Apple…

Getting Started with Arch Linux

Filed under
Linux

maketecheasier.com: As a Linux distro addict, I’ve heard of Arch many times over the years but for some reason, I’d never actually given it a shot. In particular, one aspect that’s always interested me has been Arch’s homegrown package management system, pacman. Today we’ll be finding out what Arch is all about.

Still Livin' La Vida Linux

Filed under
Linux

tuxdeluxe.org: It's been over a year since I wrote about my conversion to a Linux based digital media environment, and since it's the holiday season (or just after) I thought it was time to update the story, and describe some new Linux based devices I'm using that others might find useful.

Linux and windows people are the same

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

toolbox.com/blogs: There is a common belief propagated around the web that Linux users are a different breed of people than windows users. In the beginning of Linux history that would have been true. These days it is not.

Lenono IdeaCentre Q100

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxuser.co.uk: A low-cost nettop PC designed primarily for accessing the Internet, the Lenovo IdeaCentre Q100 is an ideal computer for knowledge workers and end-user quality assurance testing. As a primary development system, the Q100 lacks graphics power, is low on RAM, and has a slow processor.

Open source in 2009

Filed under
OSS

mybroadband.co.za: Free software made steady progress in 2009, even if it didn't have the excitement of previous years.

What Lies at the Heart of "Avatar"?

Filed under
Linux
Movies

opendotdotdot.blogspot: It takes a lot of data center horsepower to create the stunning visual effects behind blockbuster movies such as King Kong, X-Men, the Lord of the Rings trilogy and most recently, James Cameron’s $230 million Avatar.

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Seven great Ubuntu applications
  • Release Early, Release Often, Adopt Slowly
  • Linux drivers for Broadcom HD Video Accelerator
  • How to install Cairo-Dock on Simply Linux 5
  • Gifts for Gamers: Some End-of-Year Recommendations, Part 3
  • Theming GNOME
  • Announcing Acire
  • Put some meat on it: Writing release announcements
  • Pixelize, create an image consisting of many small images
  • The Quandary over Open Source Support
  • Terminator – Run Multiple Terminals in a Single Window
  • What Is Ubuntu?
  • Firefox 4 slips to 2011
  • As a linux sysadmin I do care about
  • Queen Rania using Drupal, Ashley Tisdale using Drupal
  • A Dinosaur Game Is Coming To Linux
  • 2009: A breakthrough year for mobile Linux
  • Running Different OSs Inside Windows
  • MySQL Database Corruption Post Collation Issues
  • All Quiet on the CodePlex Front as 100 Day Mark Passes

Will Linux Survive the Global Economic Meltdown?

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: While companies worldwide look for ways to reduce costs, shed dead weight from their labor resources and streamline their businesses, it makes me wonder if Linux will survive the global economic meltdown.

Learning is Childsplay

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: After I finished my recent articles on Teaching with Tux and Learning with Gcompris, I received a couple of suggestions from readers that I take a look at Childsplay. I spent some time looking at Childsplay and if you have small children, I think you should too.

Ubuntu 32-bit, 32-bit PAE, 64-bit Kernel Benchmarks

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Coming up in our forums was a testing request to compare the performance of Linux between using 32-bit, 32-bit PAE, and 64-bit kernels. We decided to compare the performance of the 32-bit, 32-bit PAE, and 64-bit kernels on a modern desktop system and here are the results.

FreeBSD Foundation end-of-year newsletter (2009)

Filed under
BSD

freebsdnews.net: Deb Goodkin announced the publication of the annual FreeBSD Foundation’s End-of-Year Newsletter (2009). Highlights include: Letter From the President, End-of-Year Fundraising Update, and New Console Driver.

Why can't we all just get along?

Filed under
OSS

linux-magazine.com: At the risk of sounding naive, I'm concerned about how members of the free and open source software (FOSS) community treat each other. No doubt in most parts of the community, people are getting things done while keeping civil. But, publicly, or when the big issues are raised, a sustained nastiness has crept into discussions over the last year or so.

10+ free, fast-booting Linux distros that aren't Chrome OS

Filed under
Linux

downloadsquad.com: Sure, Chrome OS has been all over the headlines since early December. But it might not run on your hardware and you're going to have to wait at least a year for the final version. Why bother waiting?

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Uber, Replacing x86 Firmware, 'IoT' and Chromebook

  • Key Dem calls for FTC to investigate Uber data breach

    A key Democrat is calling on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate a massive Uber breach that released data on 57 million people, as well as the company's delay in reporting the cyber incident.

  • Multiple states launch probes into massive Uber breach
  • Replacing x86 firmware with Linux and Go

    The problem, Minnich said, is that Linux has lost its control of the hardware. Back in the 1990s, when many of us started working with Linux, it controlled everything in the x86 platform. But today there are at least two and a half kernels between Linux and the hardware. Those kernels are proprietary and, not surprisingly, exploit friendly. They run at a higher privilege level than Linux and can manipulate both the hardware and the operating system in various ways. Worse yet, exploits can be written into the flash of the system so that they persist and are difficult or impossible to remove—shredding the motherboard is likely the only way out.

  • Connected sex-toy allows for code-injection attacks on a robot you wrap around your genitals

    However, the links included base-64 encoded versions of the entire blowjob file, making it vulnerable to code-injection attacks. As Lewis notes, "I will leave you to ponder the consequences of having an XSS vulnerability on a page with no framebusting and preauthed connection to a robot wrapped around or inside someones genitals..."

  • Chromebook exploit earns researcher second $100k bounty
    For Google’s bug bounty accountants, lightning just struck twice. In September 2016, an anonymous hacker called Gzob Qq earned $100,000 (£75,000) for reporting a critical “persistent compromise” exploit of Google’s Chrome OS, used by Chromebooks. Twelve months on and the same researcher was wired an identical pay out for reporting – yes! – a second critical persistent compromise of Google’s Chrome OS. By this point you might think Google was regretting its 2014 boast that it could confidently double its maximum payout for Chrome OS hacks to $100,000 because “since we introduced the $50,000 reward, we haven’t had a successful submission.” More likely, it wasn’t regretting it at all because isn’t being told about nasty vulnerabilities the whole point of bug bounties?
  • Why microservices are a security issue
    And why is that? Well, for those of us with a systems security bent, the world is an interesting place at the moment. We're seeing a growth in distributed systems, as bandwidth is cheap and latency low. Add to this the ease of deploying to the cloud, and more architects are beginning to realise that they can break up applications, not just into multiple layers, but also into multiple components within the layer. Load balancers, of course, help with this when the various components in a layer are performing the same job, but the ability to expose different services as small components has led to a growth in the design, implementation, and deployment of microservices.

Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Debuts with New Theme Engine and ZFS Integrations

Lumina 1.4.0 is a major release that introduces several new core components, such as the Lumina Theme Engine to provide enhanced theming capabilities for the desktop environment and apps written in the Qt 5 application framework. The Lumina Theme Engine comes with a configuration utility and makes the previous desktop theme system obsolete, though it's possible to migrate your current settings to the new engine. "The backend of this engine is a standardized theme plugin for the Qt5 toolkit, so that all Qt5 applications will now present a unified appearance (if the application does not enforce a specific appearance/theme of it’s own)," said the developer in today's announcement. "Users of the Lumina desktop will automatically have this plugin enabled: no special action is required." Read more

today's leftovers

  • qBittorrent 4.0 Is a Massive Update of the Open-Source BitTorrent Client
    qBittorrent, the open-source and cross-platform BitTorrent client written in Qt for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, has been updated to version 4.0, a major release adding numerous new features and improvements. qBittorrent 4.0 is the first release of the application to drop OS/2 support, as well as support for the old Qt 4 framework as Qt 5.5.1 or later is now required to run it on all supported platforms. It also brings a new logo and a new SVG-based icon theme can be easily scaled. Lots of other cosmetic changes are present in this release, and the WebGUI received multiple enhancements.
  • FFmpeg Continues Working Its "NVDEC" NVIDIA Video Decoding Into Shape
    Earlier this month the FFmpeg project landed its initial NVDEC NVIDIA video decoding support after already supporting NVENC for video encoding. These new NVIDIA APIs for encode/decode are part of the company's Video Codec SDK with CUDA and is the successor to the long-used VDPAU video decoding on NVIDIA Linux boxes. That NVDEC support has continued getting into shape.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.10075 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    A new firmware for the Kobo ebook reader came out and I adjusted the mega update pack to use it. According to the comments in the firmware thread it is working faster than previous releases. The most incredible change though is the update from wpa_supplicant 0.7.1 (around 2010) to 2.7-devel (current). Wow.
  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC has dual mini-PCIe slots and triple displays
    Avalue’s Linux-friendly, 3.5-inch “ECM-APL2” SBC features Apollo Lake SoCs, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 2x mini-PCIe, triple displays, and optional -40 to 85°C. Avalue’s 3.5-inch, Apollo Lake based ECM-APL single-board computer was announced a year ago, shortly after Intel unveiled its Apollo Lake generation. Now it has followed up with an ECM-APL2 3.5-incher with a slightly different, and reduced, feature set.
  • 7 Best Android Office Apps To Meet Your Productivity Needs
    Office application is an essential suite that allows you to create powerful spreadsheets, documents, presentations, etc., on a smartphone. Moreover, Android office apps come with cloud integration so that you can directly access the reports from the cloud, edit them, or save them online. To meet the productivity need of Android users, the Play Store offers an extensive collection of Android office apps. But, we have saved you the hassle of going through each one of them and provided you a list of the best office apps for Android. The apps that we have picked are all free, although some do have Pro version or extra features available for in-app purchases. You can also refer to this list if you’re looking for Microsoft Office alternatives for your PC.

Servers and Red Hat