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Friday, 22 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Learning to love KDE 4 (part II)

Filed under
KDE

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: The main difference between KDE 3 and KDE 4 is that the former is fixed and static while the latter is dynamic and interactive. For a trivial example of that go to System Settings / Desktop / All Effects and activate Snow. Now hitting the Meta+Ctrl+F12 keys (or Win+Ctrl+F12) will fill your desktop with falling snowflakes.

What's behind Web browser choices

Filed under
Software

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Next Firefox can detect computer orientation
  • Gnome Summit (@MIT)
  • Reuters using Drupal
  • 'Amateur' Linux IBM mainframe failure blamed
  • Supported Files Of Various Ubuntu Multimedia Programs
  • Karmic Gets New Sound For Empathy
  • Debian powers robotic sub to victory
  • Linux is an Evil and Uncompassionate OS
  • Is Big Blue a Desktop Linux Friend or Foe?
  • Windows Does Not Scale
  • Free/Open Source Software Academia Conference
  • Go track yourself
  • Why Public Education Must Use Public Software
  • Marten Mickos: Trust the Mighty MySQL Nation

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Enable Facebook Chat In Empathy
  • Start screen and automatically run a command
  • Gnu Screen theme cycle with keybinding
  • Enhancing Pidgin
  • Recover deleted files in linux with Photorec
  • Upgrade Ubuntu 9.04 to 9.10
  • How to disable Popup Bubble notifications in Pidgin messenger?
  • Create deb file of packages installed in your system
  • Alternative to magic_quotes in PHP 5.3 and PHP6
  • Get Things Done Faster With Kupfer
  • How to install VMware Server on Ubuntu
  • HowTo Install Latest Version of Wine on Ubuntu Linux
  • Android or WebOS? Try before you buy!

Review: Ubuntu 9.10 Brings Good Karma To Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

crn.com: Canonical has some lofty ambitions for Ubuntu 9.10, code-named "Karmic Koala." CRN Test Center reviewers took a look at the beta release of Ubuntu 9.10.

Green Computing is More Than Sleep Mode

linuxplanet.com: Carbon footprint and sustainability is increasingly important for all of us -- so how does the ecological footprint of your computing habits pan out?

Apple vs. Microsoft: Top 20 stolen ideas of OS wars

Filed under
OS

infoworld.com: Although Mac fanboys and Windows zealots don't like to admit it, the fact is that both Windows 7 and Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard contain features that originated in the other OS. Some features were stolen so long ago that they've become part of the computing landscape, and it's difficult to remember who invented what.

The Great Software Freedom Debate, Part 368

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com/blog: It seems that we can never quite get away from our industry's version of "how many angels can dance on the head of a pin." Namely, how open source are you? Or, as it is usually expressed: I'm more open source than you.

Asus Eee PC 1008HA Linux source code now available

Filed under
OSS

liliputing.com: The Asus Eee PC 1008HA is a thin and light netbook that weighs just 2.4 pounds and measures just an inch thick. And it’s currently only available with Windows XP. But this weekend Asus did something interesting.

Chromium: It really shines

Filed under
Software

amarok.kde.org: Have you tried it yet? I'm running the Chromium "Daily Builds" on Kubuntu 9.10. At first, not very long ago, I was quite skeptical about Chromium. It looked unfamiliar, it seemed to lack features. Then, about a week ago, I gave it another try. And boy, has it improved!

How to use Amarok to manage your iPod

Filed under
Software

howtogeek.com: Sometimes it can be difficult to manage your iPod in Linux without hacking iTunes on your Ubuntu machine. Today we take a look at using the popular music player Amarok to mange your iPod on Ubuntu.

Bringing Linux to Small Business

Filed under
Linux

linuxfoundation.org/blog-entry: We are all impressed and excited by the success of commercial Linux vendors. But let's face it, small- to medium-sized businessed are still underserved by Linux and free/open source software.

ARMing desktop Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

computerworld.com: For a brief time in 2008, the Linux desktop actually owned a segment of the desktop industry: netbooks. That was then. ARM-based netbooks, however, are on their way and, since these systems can't run Windows, Linux has the potential market all to itself.

The Many Ways to Copy, Move, Rename, and Archive in KDE 4

Filed under
KDE

maketecheasier.com: In my last post, I covered some of the features in Dolphin that I find particularly useful. In this post, you will learn about some very basic features that everyone uses, but you may not know all of the various easy methods of accomplishing them.

Sun releases Solaris 10 10/09

Filed under
OS

h-online.com: Sun Microsystems has announced the availability of the 10/09 update for its Solaris 10 operating system (OS). The latest release includes a number of bug fixes, feature updates and expanded support for new processors.

OLPC Afghanistan's Pedal Powered Progress

Filed under
OLPC

olpcnews.com: Just this morning we tested the first prototype - the PAIWASTOON team that perform the technical implementation designed a new pedal powered machine that can power the XO as you pedal and use it at the same time. Even small kids (3/4th grade) can power it.

Ubuntu 9.10 makes a serious charge toward the enterprise level

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.techrepublic.com: At the end of this month (October 29th, 2009 to be exact), Ubuntu will be releasing its newest take on the Linux operating system. This time around, it should be obvious (even to the biggest of skeptics) that Ubuntu is making some serious inroads to the business and enterprise scene.

Top 5 open source Firewall

blog.taragana.com: With perilous threats from crackers and script kiddes lurking in the network, IT administrators could do no better than placing a firewall protection. After an comprehensive search we assorted the top 5 open source firewall.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Programming: Programming Skills, Beignet OpenCL Now Supports LLVM 5.0, DRUD Tech Releases DDEV Community

     
  • The Four Layers of Programming Skills
    When learning how to code for the first time, there's a common misconception that learning how to code is primarily about learning the syntax of a programming language. That is, learning how the special symbols, keywords, and characters must be written in the right order for the language to run without errors. However, focusing only on knowledge of syntax is a bit like practicing to write a novel by only studying grammar and spelling. Grammar and spelling are needed to write a novel, but there are many other layers of skills that are needed in order to write an original, creative novel. [...] This is the layer that is most often focused on in the early learning phase. Syntax skills essentially means how to read and write a programming language using the rules for how different characters must be used for the code to actually work.
  • Beignet OpenCL Now Supports LLVM 5.0
    For those making use of Beignet for Intel graphics OpenCL acceleration on Linux, it finally has added support for LLVM 5.0. Beignet doesn't tend to support new LLVM versions early but rather a bit notorious for their tardiness in supporting new LLVM releases. LLVM 5.0 has been out for two weeks, so Beignet Git has moved on to adding support for LLVM 5. There were Beignet changes to libocl and GBE for enabling the LLVM 5.0 support.
  • DRUD Tech Releases DDEV Community, the Premier Open Source Toolkit to Simplify End-to-End Web Development Processes

Microsoft EEE

  • Why the Windows Subsystem for Linux Matters to You – Even if You Don’t Use it [Ed: Microsoft pulling an EEE on GNU/Linux matters. Sure it does... while suing GNU/Linux with software patents Microsoft says it "loves Linux".]
  • Canonical Teams Up with Microsoft to Enable New Azure Tailored Ubuntu Kernel
    In a joint collaboration with Microsoft's Azure team, Canonical managed to enable a new Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel in the Ubuntu Cloud Images for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on Azure starting today, September 21, 2017. The Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel is now enabled by default for the Ubuntu Cloud images running the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing platform, and Canonical vows to offer the same level of support as the rest of its Ubuntu kernels until the operating system reaches end of life.

Servers: Kubernetes, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and Sysadmin 101

  • Kubernetes Snaps: The Quick Version
    When we built the Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK), one of our goals was to provide snap packages for the various Kubernetes clients and services: kubectl, kube-apiserver, kubelet, etc. While we mainly built the snaps for use in CDK, they are freely available to use for other purposes as well. Let’s have a quick look at how to install and configure the Kubernetes snaps directly.
  • Kubernetes is Transforming Operations in the Enterprise
    At many organizations, managing containerized applications at scale is the order of the day (or soon will be). And few open source projects are having the impact in this arena that Kubernetes is. Above all, Kubernetes is ushering in “operations transformation” and helping organizations make the transition to cloud-native computing, says Craig McLuckie co-founder and CEO of Heptio and a co-founder of Kubernetes at Google, in a recent free webinar, ‘Getting to Know Kubernetes.’ Kubernetes was created at Google, which donated the open source project to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.
  • Kubernetes gains momentum as big-name vendors flock to Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Like a train gaining speed as it leaves the station, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation is quickly gathering momentum, attracting some of the biggest names in tech. In the last month and a half alone AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and Pivotal have all joined. It’s not every day you see this group of companies agree on anything, but as Kubernetes has developed into an essential industry tool, each of these companies sees it as a necessity to join the CNCF and support its mission. This is partly driven by customer demand and partly by the desire to simply have a say in how Kubernetes and other related cloud-native technologies are developed.
  • The Cloud-Native Architecture: One Stack, Many Options
    As the chief technology officer of a company specialized in cloud native storage, I have a first hand view of the massive transformation happening right now in enterprise IT. In short, two things are happening in parallel right now that make it radically simpler to build, deploy and run sophisticated applications. The first is the move to the cloud. This topic has been discussed so much that I won’t try to add anything new. We all know it’s happening, and we all know that its impact is huge.
  • Sysadmin 101: Leveling Up
    I hope this description of levels in systems administration has been helpful as you plan your own career. When it comes to gaining experience, nothing quite beats making your own mistakes and having to recover from them yourself. At the same time, it sure is a lot easier to invite battle-hardened senior sysadmins to beers and learn from their war stories. I hope this series in Sysadmin 101 fundamentals has been helpful for those of you new to the sysadmin trenches, and also I hope it helps save you from having to learn from your own mistakes as you move forward in your career.