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Sunday, 26 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New Open Source Effort Provides Free Cloud Orchestration as a Service Rianne Schestowitz 31/07/2014 - 6:53am
Story LibreOffice 4.3 Released, KDE Naming, and Zorin Reasons Rianne Schestowitz 31/07/2014 - 6:42am
Story Ubuntu: Through the Eyes of a Travel Blogger Rianne Schestowitz 31/07/2014 - 6:36am
Story Jessie will ship Linux 3.16 Rianne Schestowitz 31/07/2014 - 1:06am
Story Magellan GPS takes Android for an RV adventure Rianne Schestowitz 31/07/2014 - 1:01am
Story Review: Linux Mint 17 "Qiana" MATE Rianne Schestowitz 31/07/2014 - 12:31am
Story Looking for a technology job? Learn as much as you can about open source Roy Schestowitz 30/07/2014 - 10:20pm
Story Linode Releases Open Source Cloud Hosting Documentation Rianne Schestowitz 30/07/2014 - 9:09pm
Story Evince Hackfest Rianne Schestowitz 30/07/2014 - 9:04pm
Story GSoC: Open Source Event Manager Organizer Dashboard Rianne Schestowitz 30/07/2014 - 8:56pm

Review: Mepis 8.0

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: I AM a little conflicted about Mepis. There is much to like about version 8.0, released recently to coincide with the launch of its parent distribution, Debian 5.0 'Lenny'.

Linux forensics - Part 1: Helix

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: In this article, we will introduce and review Helix, a vastly powerful Linux forensics distribution. Helix is a live Linux CD carefully tailored for incident response, system investigation and analysis, data recovery, and security auditing.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • KDE 4.2 on Gentoo

  • Comux 001001
  • My friends will kill me
  • Logitech MX1000 Laser Mouse Ubuntu 8.10
  • screencast of open web video in firefox 3.1
  • Red Hat VP explains software patent threat at Linux Expo
  • List of Free Software non-profits
  • Ubuntu 9.04's New Login Screen and other features
  • How To Lean Towards Free & Open
  • The Falcon Programming Language: a brief tutorial
  • Hawking Open Source in Tough Times
  • DNSSEC: Forgetting The User, Again.
  • Book Review: Using Drupal
  • Strange Bedfellows: Citrix, (Free) Xen & Microsoft
  • OpenOffice's new location for developer builds
  • Ubuntu Jaunty - Codec Helper is more helpful
  • Fictional Air Combat 0.1.3
  • 5 Reasons Why I Bought a Kindle 2
  • Labour disingenously adopts Tory position on open source software
  • Sorry, socialists: Open source is a capitalist's game
  • Acquia, Alfresco Partner With Optaros for First Drupal CMIS Interface
  • Mozilla Developer News 2/24

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Gentoo Linux - Part 1 - SSH

  • High perfomance Xen virtualization on Ubuntu server
  • Fix For Grub Problem After Fedora Update
  • How to add your own Nameservers to Arch Linux when using dhcp
  • lenny-backports
  • Disable GNOME Automounting
  • Gimp Tip: Document History Dialog
  • Ubuntu Linux: The Easy Installation Guide
  • Enabling Web Video Playback in Fedora 10

Debian Lenny: Returning Home to the Mothership

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com/blog: I've been using Kubuntu and Ubuntu the past couple of years on my main workstation and laptop, but my first Linux love was Debian, and with the release of Lenny I have gone back.

Also: Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 codename Lenny - Review

Google Vs. Symbian: 'My Linux Is More Open Than Your Linux'

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com/blog: It looks like a war of words has broken out between Google (NSDQ: GOOG) and the Symbian Foundation over which mobile platform is truly more open. Is there really a right answer to this debate?

The Linux of our Understanding

Filed under
Linux

aplawrence.com: We techy folks are sometimes quick to pull the trigger when we spot people using tools without proper understanding. We laugh at Windows "point and click" mentality. Sometimes it may be justified, but I have to wonder if our own houses can stand deep inspection.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 60

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Issue #60 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue: Open Letter to the openSUSE Community, Andrew Wafaa: Ciao For Now And Bonne Chance Amigos, and Lars Vogdt: Why the Buildservice is currently not for endusers.

Intel X25-E Extreme SSD Benchmarks On Linux

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: The Intel X25-E Extreme SSD that we happen to have our hands on courtesy of System76 is designed for servers, mass storage, and workstations.

World's 'smallest, lightest' laptop launches

Filed under
Hardware

reghardware.co.uk: The mbook measures just 158 x 94.1 x 18.6mm and weighs only 315g, yet its diminutive 4.8in display has a 1024 x 600 resolution and appears to be stylus operated.

The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

Filed under
Linux

maximumpc.com: We are certain that many of you want to try Linux to see what it is like, but have no idea where to start or how to get into it. This article is the first installment in a four-part guide that will gradually introduce you to the Linux environment and how to adjust to it if you are a new user.

Review: Proxmox VE

Filed under
Linux

montanalinux.org: Proxmox VE is a “bare metal” ISO Linux distribution that is a virtual machine platform. It is geared towards enterprise users and designed to be installed on enterprise grade hardware. The Proxmox VE distribution combines two virtual machine technologies; KVM and OpenVZ.

Microsoft Sees Threat From Android Notebooks

Filed under
OS

internetnews.com: Ballmer and company dig in to stave off Google -- and weigh a Yahoo partnership to bolster their plan.

Review: Crunch Bang Linux 8.10

Filed under
Linux

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: I discovered Crunch Bang Linux (#!) through Linux Outlaws. Fab kept talking about how awesome it was. Then more and more podcasts and people on the tubes started talking about it.

Giving kids a fresh start with Qimo Linux

Filed under
Linux

news.cnet.com: Many Windows users, for example, have spent decades learning and using the operating system: they don't want to be bothered with learning another. Those are fogies like you and me. Kids, however, are a tabula rosa.

Serious considerations before upgrading to PHP 5.3

Filed under
Web

Learn about serious things to consider when upgrading from PHP V5.2 to PHP V5.3

Nouveau Becomes The Default Driver In Fedora 11

Filed under
Linux
Software

phoronix.com: Among a horde of other features to be introduced with Fedora 11 (a.k.a. Leonidas), the Nouveau driver will become the default NVIDIA driver on this Red Hat distribution.

KDE 4.2: Ten Tips for Getting Started

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: Over the last year, the KDE 4 releases have suffered frequently hostile receptions. To help bring you up to speed, here are ten tips for understanding and working with KDE 4.2. They aren't exhaustive by any means -- but they should be enough to make you comfortable moving around KDE 4.2 so that you can discover other changes on your own.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones. Read more