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About Tux Machines

Friday, 22 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 06/02/2015 - 11:45pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 06/02/2015 - 11:40pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 06/02/2015 - 11:40pm
Story Xiaomi’s MIUI 6 OS adds style and function to Android Roy Schestowitz 06/02/2015 - 11:38pm
Story Fedora 21 Cinnamon Desktop : Video Overview and Screenshot Tours Roy Schestowitz 06/02/2015 - 11:30pm
Story FSF JavaScript guidelines picked up by Posteo Webmail Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2015 - 10:36pm
Story The first Tizen smartphone isn’t an “Android killer”—it’s a bad Android clone Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2015 - 9:18pm
Story Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS Launch Delayed by Two Weeks Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2015 - 9:09pm
Story GNU C Library 2.21 Released With Bug & Security Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2015 - 9:04pm
Story MIPS Creator C120 development board and Debian 7 Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2015 - 8:35pm

France begins IT research centre on innovation and free software

Filed under
OSS

osor.eu: France's national computer science institute, Inria, says free software is essential to develop digital society. The institute is launching a research centre to focus on this type of software.

4,273,291 lines of code in KDE

Filed under
KDE

blog.cornelius-schumacher.de: 4,273,291 lines of code, that's the size of the KDE core modules, which are released as the official KDE software distribution, as of today.

Shall we play a game?

Filed under
Gaming

toolbox.com/blogs: In the style of the Command & Conqueror genre type of games this newly discovered (by me) time waster is called Warzone 2100. Anyone who states that there are no good games for Linux need to pull their sat out of their ash.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 324

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: Sabayon Linux Five Point OH!
  • News: Debian develops kFreeBSD port, Debian submarine wins competition, Red Hat and Novell argue numbers, Gentoo release statistics, Mandriva re-introduces itself
  • Released last week: Dragora GNU/Linux 1.1, LliureX 9.09, Tiny Core Linux 2.4
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 12 Beta, openSUSE 11.2 RC1, Ubuntu 9.10 RC
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

The Two Elephant Problem

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: When an open source project wants to make major changes in its core code, such as revamping a user interface library, it faces the two elephant problem. The difficulty is moving the second elephant into the room without disturbing the first or just filling the room completely with elephant.

Nero Linux 4 - Still the Best Burning Tool for Linux?

Filed under
Software

techgage.com: One of the best features of Linux is its sheer number of free available applications. But once in a while, certain commercial offerings deliver enough features and an ease-of-use that makes it worthy of consideration. Nero Linux is one of those.

FLOSS in Egypt (and bits of the Middle-East)

Filed under
OSS

geekyogre.com: One of the biggest benefits of FLOSS is that it is for free and open source. Which a lot of developed countries learned how to make use of, decrease costs and generate profit. It has become a trend that more and more nations are adopting in sense of deployment and contribution. Yet where I come from people are not catching up on the trend.

Does Free Software deserve a Nobel Prize?

Filed under
OSS

Jon maddog Hall: I woke up on the morning of October 9th to find that President Obama had won the Nobel Peace Prize. As I read his acceptance speech, I thought about Free and Open Source Software, and applied parts of his speech to my favorite subject.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux 2.6.32-rc4 Brings A Huge, Bloated Driver
  • Extract Audio from Video Files to WAV using Mplayer
  • Use Your LastFm Data As A Cool Wallpaper!
  • Nice effect for Gimp : Harry's Mist and Fog
  • Secure remote storage with Dropbox and TrueCrypt
  • FreeBSD - installation process
  • Mandriva 2009.1 and Intel Graphics
  • Backup your Linux box with rsync
  • How to verify your files in Linux with MD5
  • [ How to ] Use CentOS repos in RHEL-5 Server

The 10 Best Linux Distributions of 2009

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: It was exactly one year ago today that I published my original "The 10 Best Linux Distributions" and it's time to put forth a new list for this year's best. Without looking at the old list, I've decided to compile this one from scratch.

Gnome is Rapidly Becoming My Least Favorite Desktop

Filed under
Software

penguinpetes.com: Part of my motivation when I made the big switch from Slackware to Ubuntu was a desire to step out of my comfort zone and give something different a try. And while I've warmed up to Ubuntu - heck, I even like it at times! - I'm still cold on Gnome.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #163

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #163 for the week October 4th - October 10th, 2009 is available.

The Situation Now (2019)

Filed under
OSS

trombonechamp.wordpress: Sam opened his eyes to the sun shining in his window, birds chirping outside, and the smell of a fresh summer breeze. Sam got himself ready, grabbed a bite to eat, and jumped on the bus on his way to his job at the Proprietary Software Foundation.

Karmic review

Filed under
Ubuntu

jbailey.livejournal: Jaunty was miserable. Bugs in the Intel drivers meant that DVD playing stopped working, sounds would occasionally lock up, and things were just painfully slow. Karmic to the rescue.

'Frankencamera': A Giant Leap For Digital Photos?

Filed under
Hardware

npr.org: It's big. It's ugly. It's made from recycled parts, and uses a Linux operating system.

Unreasonable Demands

Filed under
Software

boycott-boycottnovell.com: There was a little bit of a set-to on identi.ca yesterday, wherein Bradley Kuhn of the SFLC felt it necessary to "denounce" people who were expressing some excitement there about "Hulu" bringing out a version for Linux. According to Kuhn, such interest is a "tragedy".

Home Users, Don't Update Your Linux Desktop!

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: There are certain Linux distributions, those so called rolling distros, generally don't break after you update regularly. But some bleeding edge distributions (like Fedora) general break or behave badly.

Gordon's Adventures with Ubuntu - Part 1

Filed under
Ubuntu

gordonsramblings.blogspot: On Thursday night I downloaded and installed Linux on my laptop. My son suggested that Ubuntu would be a good option as her reckopns it is probably the implementation that is most complete. As it says on the website - "Linux for humans".

Definitive Guide to Viruses & Antivirus Softwares under GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

gauravlive.com: After having travelled through the virus infested land of Windows, new Linux converts often have queries about viruses on their Linux systems. Here I will demystify all those queries related to Viruses, Antivirus software’s etc once & for all.

The problem with Gentoo: my reactions

Filed under
Gentoo

thelinuxexperiment.com: One of the articles Tyler passed me this morning was a brief post on three problems with Gentoo by Dion Moult. There are a few things he’s mentioned that I definitely agree with. Having used the distribution for a little over a month, some minor changes would go a long way to making the experience less painful and more usable.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Programming Skills, Beignet OpenCL Now Supports LLVM 5.0, DRUD Tech Releases DDEV Community

     
  • The Four Layers of Programming Skills
    When learning how to code for the first time, there's a common misconception that learning how to code is primarily about learning the syntax of a programming language. That is, learning how the special symbols, keywords, and characters must be written in the right order for the language to run without errors. However, focusing only on knowledge of syntax is a bit like practicing to write a novel by only studying grammar and spelling. Grammar and spelling are needed to write a novel, but there are many other layers of skills that are needed in order to write an original, creative novel. [...] This is the layer that is most often focused on in the early learning phase. Syntax skills essentially means how to read and write a programming language using the rules for how different characters must be used for the code to actually work.
  • Beignet OpenCL Now Supports LLVM 5.0
    For those making use of Beignet for Intel graphics OpenCL acceleration on Linux, it finally has added support for LLVM 5.0. Beignet doesn't tend to support new LLVM versions early but rather a bit notorious for their tardiness in supporting new LLVM releases. LLVM 5.0 has been out for two weeks, so Beignet Git has moved on to adding support for LLVM 5. There were Beignet changes to libocl and GBE for enabling the LLVM 5.0 support.
  • DRUD Tech Releases DDEV Community, the Premier Open Source Toolkit to Simplify End-to-End Web Development Processes

Microsoft EEE

  • Why the Windows Subsystem for Linux Matters to You – Even if You Don’t Use it [Ed: Microsoft pulling an EEE on GNU/Linux matters. Sure it does... while suing GNU/Linux with software patents Microsoft says it "loves Linux".]
  • Canonical Teams Up with Microsoft to Enable New Azure Tailored Ubuntu Kernel
    In a joint collaboration with Microsoft's Azure team, Canonical managed to enable a new Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel in the Ubuntu Cloud Images for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on Azure starting today, September 21, 2017. The Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel is now enabled by default for the Ubuntu Cloud images running the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing platform, and Canonical vows to offer the same level of support as the rest of its Ubuntu kernels until the operating system reaches end of life.

Servers: Kubernetes, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and Sysadmin 101

  • Kubernetes Snaps: The Quick Version
    When we built the Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK), one of our goals was to provide snap packages for the various Kubernetes clients and services: kubectl, kube-apiserver, kubelet, etc. While we mainly built the snaps for use in CDK, they are freely available to use for other purposes as well. Let’s have a quick look at how to install and configure the Kubernetes snaps directly.
  • Kubernetes is Transforming Operations in the Enterprise
    At many organizations, managing containerized applications at scale is the order of the day (or soon will be). And few open source projects are having the impact in this arena that Kubernetes is. Above all, Kubernetes is ushering in “operations transformation” and helping organizations make the transition to cloud-native computing, says Craig McLuckie co-founder and CEO of Heptio and a co-founder of Kubernetes at Google, in a recent free webinar, ‘Getting to Know Kubernetes.’ Kubernetes was created at Google, which donated the open source project to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.
  • Kubernetes gains momentum as big-name vendors flock to Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Like a train gaining speed as it leaves the station, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation is quickly gathering momentum, attracting some of the biggest names in tech. In the last month and a half alone AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and Pivotal have all joined. It’s not every day you see this group of companies agree on anything, but as Kubernetes has developed into an essential industry tool, each of these companies sees it as a necessity to join the CNCF and support its mission. This is partly driven by customer demand and partly by the desire to simply have a say in how Kubernetes and other related cloud-native technologies are developed.
  • The Cloud-Native Architecture: One Stack, Many Options
    As the chief technology officer of a company specialized in cloud native storage, I have a first hand view of the massive transformation happening right now in enterprise IT. In short, two things are happening in parallel right now that make it radically simpler to build, deploy and run sophisticated applications. The first is the move to the cloud. This topic has been discussed so much that I won’t try to add anything new. We all know it’s happening, and we all know that its impact is huge.
  • Sysadmin 101: Leveling Up
    I hope this description of levels in systems administration has been helpful as you plan your own career. When it comes to gaining experience, nothing quite beats making your own mistakes and having to recover from them yourself. At the same time, it sure is a lot easier to invite battle-hardened senior sysadmins to beers and learn from their war stories. I hope this series in Sysadmin 101 fundamentals has been helpful for those of you new to the sysadmin trenches, and also I hope it helps save you from having to learn from your own mistakes as you move forward in your career.

Databases: PostgreSQL 10 RC1 and Greenplum

  • PostgreSQL 10 RC1 Released
    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces today that the first release candidate of version 10 is available for download. As a release candidate, 10 RC 1 should be identical to the final release of the new version. It contains fixes for all known issues found during testing, so users should test and report any issues that they find.
  • PostgreSQL 10 Release Candidate 1 Arrives
    PostgreSQL 10 has been queuing up improvements to declarative partitioning, logical replication support, an improved parallel query system, SCRAM authentication, performance speed-ups, hash indexes are now WAL, extended statistics, new integrity checking tools, smart connection handling, and many other promising improvements. Our earlier performance tests of Postgre 10 during its beta phase showed some speed-ups over PostgreSQL 9.
  • Pivotal Greenplum Analytic Database Adds Multicloud Support
    Pivotal’s latest release of its Greenplum analytic database includes multicloud support and, for the first time, is based entirely on open source code. In 2015, the company open sourced the core of Pivotal Greenplum as the Greenplum Database project. “This is the first commercially available release that we are shipping with the open source project truly at its core,” said Elisabeth Hendrickson, VP of data research and development at Pivotal.