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Monday, 23 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Where open source was, and where it is now

Filed under
OSS
  • Where open source was, and where it is now
  • Netherlands' open-source policy goes double Dutch
  • Open-source tools could make it easier to build a hybrid cloud
  • Chair of Denmark’s standards committee: ‘Microsoft is lying’
  • EU space agency to start a repository for open source applications
  • B-Reel goes Open Source to Standardize Digital Production
  • Open-source tools wrest control of personal data

Revisiting KDE 4

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

jonreagan.wordpress: Recently I have installed Kubuntu 9.10 on my school computer, just to see how it would work under the stress of all the school work I do. I must say – it’s excelling at the job.

PCs for Old Folks: Do Seniors Need Stripped Down Tech?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

wired.com: Imagine a computer that was so simple even a complete novice could use it out of the box. A computer with a low-powered, low performance and low-priced CPU, the Sempron LE-1250 (or maybe even an Intel Atom). What would you do if you had a warehouse full of these machines, all less capable than the cheapest netbook?

Building On-Ramps on the Fedora 12 Highway

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: "It's all about building on-ramps," says Paul W. Frields, the Fedora Project Leader. “As a community, we tend to be oriented towards getting people involved in the open source process, rather than towards getting everyone to switch from whatever they're using now."

Linux Bug #1: Bad Documentation

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com/blog: The Internet and Google have made FOSS developers lazy because they have made it too easy to abdicate the job of proper documentation to "The community." Telling users and potential contributors to use Google, mailing lists, and forums is not documentation. It's a way to guarantee having fewer users, unhappy users, and fewer contributors.

AIX tips for Red Hat Enterprise Linux Admins

Filed under
Linux

Are you broadening your skills as a Linux systems administrator into various flavors of UNIX? Get a rundown of the differences and similarities between Red Hat Enterprise Linux and IBM AIX® so that you can perform day-to-day activities with ease.

Kismet – vital Linux wifi security tool

Filed under
Software

linux.bihlman.com: Kismet is a network detector, packet sniffer, and intrusion detection system for 802.11 wireless LANs. Kismet will work with any wireless card which supports raw monitoring mode, and can sniff 802.11a, 802.11b and 802.11g traffic.

The Debian Installer – The Most Flexible Linux Installer

Filed under
Linux

pthree.org: I was just recently blown away by what I can accomplish with the Debian installer. I used to think that the openSUSE installer was the most flexible Linux installer, but I think I’m going to at least put the Debian installer in a 2-way tie for first with openSUSE.

Amarok Refreshed: Better, Stronger, Faster!

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: Even though it's a point release, the latest Amarok comes with some major new features and all the benefits of the 2.2.0 release. Dubbed "Weightless," the 2.2.1 release is full of bug fixes and polishing as well as improvements.

Fedora 12 a strong update

Filed under
Linux
  • Tip of the hat: Fedora 12 a strong update
  • Fedora 12 Review and Commentary
  • Top 10 Reasons to Try F12-Moblin

25 best quotes from tech history

computerworld.com: It's not love, war, or baseball. But over the years some memorable things have been said about technology. Some have been memorably eloquent; others are unforgettably shortsighted, wrongheaded, or just plain weird.

Adobe Flash Player 10.1 Beta For Linux

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Last night Adobe pushed out their first beta release for Adobe Flash Player 10.1. Alongside the Windows and Mac OS X beta releases was a 32-bit Linux build.

Tweaking Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

manilastandardtoday.com: ONE of the cool things about using Linux is the degree to which you can customize your system. If you want to make it look and act like a Mac, you can. Want the Windows 7 or Vista glassy look? No problem. You can do that, too.

Fedora 12, upgrade or fresh-install?

Filed under
Linux

linuxers.org: Constantine, Fedora 12 is going to be out soon. Most of the you will be in a dilemma, whether to do an upgrade or a fresh-install?

Dell's Multimedia Mini PC Ships With Ubuntu

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

ostatic.com/blog: It measures 8 inches by 8 inches--a mini system--but it packs some powerful features and is available with Ubuntu Linux pre-loaded. Dell's Zino HD Desktop computers sell for $230. For that you 8GB of RAM, you can choose from one of ten colors, you get discrete graphics, and you get some notable HD and entertainment-oriented options.

Fedora 12 Announcement

Filed under
Linux

fedoraproject.org: Fedora is a leading edge, free and open source operating system that continues to deliver innovative features to many users, with a new release about every six months. We bring to you the latest and greatest release of Fedora ever, Fedora 12!

What’s GNU in Virtualization

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: Taking a new operating system for a spin is easier than ever before with virtualization software but when that software is free, it’s even better.

Ubuntu Karmic is the venue for Gnome V KDE

Filed under
KDE
Software
Ubuntu

openbytes.wordpress: Ladies and gentlemen! In the blue corner weighing in at 9.10 is KDE and in the red corner also weighing in at 9.10 is Gnome..”For the thousands in attendance and the millions watching around the world..lets get ready to rrrrrrrumble!”

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  1. The Future of Linux is Google
  2. Q&A: How a blogger found GPL code in a Windows 7 Tool
  3. Don't Count Linux Netbooks Out
  4. Nokia Finally Releases N900, ‘Tis Exciting But A Bit Late
  5. ChromeOS with Ubuntu Karmic base? – Leaked Sources.List
  6. Let Password Gorilla store all of your passwords
  7. Ubuntu Netbook Remix To Be Renamed
  8. Netbooks are dead. Long live the notebook.
  9. Red Hat Summit and JBoss World 2010 dates confirmed
  10. Russian Linux plans are foiled
  11. Open source to the rescue?
  12. Red Hat Named Large Technology Company of the Year by NCTA
  13. It's a Free Country ...So why can't I pick the technology I use in the office?
  14. Dell Linux Engineering to participate in UDS-L
  15. Microsoft open sources .NET Micro Framework
  16. The convenient fiction that Microsoft is evil
  17. Leaning Toward Linux: What SMBs Need To Know
  18. EU finds Oracle-Sun deal anti-competitive
  19. PS3, Linux Used to Catch Child Pornographers
  20. Virtual Appliances as Debian Packages on Ubuntu

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • SUSE 11.2 Tweak – Show all tasks on Gnome Panel
  • Some Reasonable Defaults for MySQL Settings
  • Running a Simple Go Webserver on Slicehost with CentOS
  • Samba your way to network file sharing success
  • Manage Photos with Shotwell
  • Stumbling and Sniffing Wireless Networks in Linux, Part 3
  • How To Add The getdeb Repository in Ubuntu Karmic Koala
  • Proxmox VE and Shorewall Part 2
  • Linux Display Managers for fun and profit
  • Initramfs and Initrd Series: Part 2 – What is initrd and similarities with initramfs
  • Configuring Portage
  • Add, Modify, and Delete Users and Groups in Ubuntu (Using GUI)
  • Create your own customized Ubuntu Live CD
  • Managing Software under Linux (Debian) – Part 1
  • Ubuntu Karmic Desktop on EC2
  • How to shrink/expand disks in VirtualBox - Tutorial
  • How to download a directory tree with ftp
  • Important Concepts For Linux Beginners – Shells and Utilities
  • Howto install chromium using simple Script
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More in Tux Machines

PC-MOS/386 is the latest obsolete operating system to open source on Github

PC-MOS/386 was first announced by The Software Link in 1986 and was released in early 1987. It was capable of working on any x86 computer (though the Intel 80386 was its target market). However, some later chips became incompatible because they didn't have the necessary memory management unit. It had a dedicated following but also contained a couple of design flaws that made it slow and/or expensive to run. Add to that the fact it had a Y2K bug that manifested on 31 July 2012, after which any files created wouldn't work, and it's not surprising that it didn't become the gold standard. The last copyright date listed is 1992, although some users have claimed to be using it far longer. Read more

GIMP, More Awesome Than I Remember

For what seems like decades, GIMP (Graphic Image Manipulation Program) has been the de facto standard image editor for Linux. It works well, has many features, and it even supports scripting. I always have found it a bit clumsy, however, and I preferred using something else for day-to-day work. I recently had the pleasure of sitting at a computer without an image editor though, so I figured I'd give GIMP another try on a non-Linux operating system. See, the last time I tried to use GIMP on OS X, it required non-standard libraries and home-brew adding. Now, if you head over to the GIMP site, you can download a fully native version of GIMP for Windows, OS X and Linux. Read more

Linux 4.13.9

I'm announcing the release of the 4.13.9 kernel. All users of the 4.13 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.13.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.13.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more Also: Linux 4.9.58 Linux 4.4.94 Linux 3.18.77

Linux 4.14-rc6

So rc6 is delayed, not because of any development problems, but simply because the internet was horribly bad my usual Sunday afternoon time, and I decided not to even try to fight it. And by delaying things, I got a couple more ull requests in from Greg. Yay, I guess? rc6 is a bit larger than I was hoping for, and I'm not sure whether that is a sign that we _will_ need an rc8 after all this release (which wouldn't be horribly surprising), or whether it's simply due to timing. I'm going to leave that open for now, so just know that rc8 _may_ happen. Read more Also: Linux 4.14-rc6 Released: Linux 4.14 Kernel Final In 2~3 Weeks