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Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A Year of the Linux Desktop srlinuxx 05/07/2013 - 4:19am
Story The best of GNOME 3.8 srlinuxx 05/07/2013 - 4:13am
Story Slax 7.0.9 Beta Distro Features KDE 4.10.4 srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 8:45pm
Story Whisker Menu: App Launcher w/ Search for Xfce srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 8:42pm
Story Hands on with Korora 19 'Bruce' srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 6:32pm
Story StartOS 6 GNOME 3 and KDE preview srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 6:29pm
Story DoudouLinux Review: Expose your children to Linux srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 6:27pm
Story Linux Mint 15 Interview – HTML5, Arch and the MintBox srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 6:22pm
Story LXDE previews Qt port of its desktop srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 6:18pm
Story Dell XPS 13: Free as in Freedom srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 4:03pm

Package Management - Avoiding the Two Step

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: apt-get, up2date, yum, pkgtool, dpkg, rpm -- we have lots of ways to avoid compiling programs. For the most part, I don't think that it's because we don't like to compile programs, but rather because most of the modern package management tools take care of dependancies, versioning, etc.

Novell's big opportunity

Filed under
SUSE

Matt Asay: A friend called me on Friday to ask what I thought about Novell. "Does it have a chance?" he asked? The answer is increasingly, "Yes."

OpenSolaris: nice try, pity about the licence

Filed under
OS

itwire.com: Why would anyone try to introduce an operating system into the existing glut unless it pays off in spades? What can a new entrant give us that the multitude of Linux distributions, the Mac OSX and old, hoary Windows hasn't?

How everyone wins with open source software

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: Recently, I wrote a review of the note-taking application Tomboy. Though I find Tomboy exceptionally useful, I had a minor issue with the inability to create new notebooks from within a note. Within hours of the review appearing on Linux.com, Boyd Timothy, one of the app's developers mentioned in the article's comments that my idea had merit and said he would add the feature to an upcoming build. True to his word, he did.

Linux up that Laptop!

Filed under
Linux

web4everyone.blogspot: I got the idea the other day that it would be great to sit in my recliner and check my email via my laptop. The only problem was, well, I didn't really have a laptop. Hmmm; or did I? I did have an old IBM Thinkpad 600 with a Pentium II processor.

Windows XP SP3 vs. Ubuntu upgrade to 8.04

Filed under
OS

blogs.techrepublic.com: So a few friends of mine have all suffered from the Windows XP SP3 update plague that has rendered some machine in need of a complete re-install and some machines just acting as if they have been infected by some form of PC-west-nile. So instead of making fun of them for once again getting pimp-slapped by Microsoft, I thought I would try to suffer their same pain by updating my primary machine (currently running Ubuntu 7.10) to Hardy Herron 8.04.

Test Latest Builds With KDE4Daily 4.1

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: With the release of 4.1 on the horizon, and initiatives such as Krush days, recent call for help with documentation, and the perennial need for localisation it is very useful for end users to be able to easily get their hands on up-to-date builds of KDE4, preferably without having to wait for their chosen distro to provide packages. As was the case with the run up to KDE4.0, KDE4Daily VM aims to provide such a service.

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • (easy) LVM on Gentoo

  • Linux Find SCSI Hard Disk Info
  • SELinux - Highly Secured Web Hosting for Python-based Web Applications
  • Trendnet - TEW55UB USB Wireless Adapter on Linux
  • Installing Opera 9.5 Beta 2 on Ubuntu Linux
  • Linux and the health of your disk

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 254

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: A look at OpenSolaris 2008.05

  • News: openSUSE's final testing push, interviews with Paul Frields and Mark Shuttleworth, plans for upcoming Xubuntu and CentOS, Linux.com on Famelix and NimbleX, Zenwalk's new Netpkg
  • Released last week: Absolute Linux 12.1, Ultimate Linux 1.8, MiniMe 2008.0
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.0 RC1
  • New additions: Untangle Gateway
  • New distributions: Freezy Linux, Lapis Linux, PTS LiveCD
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

GPL Project Watch List for Week of 05/23

Filed under
OSS

gpl3.blogspot: The GPL v3 Watch List is intended to give you a snapshot of the GPLv3/LGPLv3 adoption for May 17th through May 23rd, 2008. This Week: Interview With Marco Barulli on Their New AGPL Suite, GPL v3 Numbers, and New Projects.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Fedora 9: Drumrolls with Linux Hydrogen

  • OpenSuse 11 and WiFi
  • Making the most of your browser screen real estate
  • KDE Tip - Switch NumLock On at Startup
  • OpenOffice automation for custom reports

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter -- 26 May 2008

Filed under
Gentoo

gentoo.org: The May issue of the Gentoo Monthly Newsletter has been released. In this month's issue: Gentoo Foundation status, Summer of Code interview, network monitoring, and more!

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 92

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #92 for the week May 18th - May 24th, 2008. In this issue we cover: Ubuntu Developer Summit Intrepid Ibex, Ubuntu Live canceled, new Ubuntu Membership Approval Boards to meet, new Ubuntu Universe Contributors, a new Launchpad podcast, and much, much more.

Firefox 3 Tip: Easily View Privacy And Security Information For Individual Sites

Filed under
Moz/FF

watchingthenet.com: One thing that frustrated me the most with Firefox 2 was trying to view security information for individual sites.

Mars Phoenix Lander - A Victory for Open Source

Filed under
OSS
Sci/Tech

ostatic.com: Space agencies were some of the first places you could find open source software "in the wild". Being natural early adopters, cash-strapped and very inquisitive they naturally took to the concept.

AMD Releases Stream SDK For Linux

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Earlier this month we announced that AMD would soon be releasing their Stream SDK for Linux, and just before the start of the weekend this inaugural release had occurred. The Linux release of the AMD Stream SDK v1.1 Beta brings both CAL and Brook+ for those using ATI/AMD graphics hardware. This v1.1 Beta release is also in tune with the new beta release for Microsoft Windows XP.

Making that old PC useful

Filed under
Linux

celettu.wordpress: I’ve recently upgraded my pc with new hardware, and I’ve been using it as a test machine ever since, something to try the new Ubuntu or Mandriva on. Both Mandriva and Ubuntu ran well on that old PC.

$200 computers

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

purinchu.net: Grandma goes to the store to see about replacing the computer with something inexpensive. Really inexpensive. After a bit more asking the clerk goes, “Well, we do have 1 machine in the back. Every store has only gotten one, but it’s only $200. Of course, it turned out that it runs Linux.

some bloggings:

Filed under
Linux
  • Transition to the GNU/Linux Ubuntu Operating System

  • Upgrade to Hardy Heron
  • Back to Windows
  • mutiny
  • TinyMe instilled new life to my HP Deskpro

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Create Screenshots via CLI with scrot

  • Using Bash Scripts in Web Applications
  • Fedora 9: All in One Kopete Messenger Installation
  • Wireless networking from the Crux live CD
  • How to get information about your file system in Ubuntu
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More in Tux Machines

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.