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Thursday, 28 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 11:19pm
Story Ubuntu Not Switching to Rolling Release Model srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:55am
Story Xfce 4.12 Desktop Is Moving Along For Release Soon srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:53am
Story Design the New OpenMandriva Logo srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:51am
Story Does SUSE Linux Have A Future? srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:50am
Story Cinnarch preview srlinuxx 25/01/2013 - 9:50pm
Story 9 Exciting Features Fedora 18 Has To Offer srlinuxx 25/01/2013 - 9:48pm
Story Fuduntu 2013.1 Review – Quite Punny srlinuxx 25/01/2013 - 9:47pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 25/01/2013 - 8:12pm
Story Valve ports Half-Life to Linux srlinuxx 25/01/2013 - 6:21pm

Europarlement testing Ubuntu, OpenOffice and Firefox

Filed under
OSS

ec.europa.eu: The European Parliament's IT department is testing the use of GNU/Linux distribution Ubuntu, OpenOffice, Firefox and other Open Source applications, the British MEP James Nicholson explained last week in a letter to Italian MEP Marco Cappato.

Open source video editing: what we have now and what we need

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Watching the evolution of open source tools for video editing and manipulation over the last 10 years has been less than a thrilling experience. But are things about to change for the better in the near future? Can even the people most disenchanted with the current state of affairs feel tempted to regain a spark of hope?

Harvard starts teaching open source

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: It's about time that United States elite academic institutions finally got around to not only using open-source software, but also teaching it. In the April 2008 edition of Harvard Business Review, Harvard gives its MBA students a taste of the decision facing every company that leverages technology as part of its business: Should I embrace or fight open source?

PCLinuxOS Gnome links two worlds

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: If you're looking for a GNOME desktop for the popular PCLinuxOS (PCLOS), then newly released PCLinuxOS Gnome might be for you.

Will Linux Dominate Ultra-Portable Market?

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: The VAR Guy was guilty of hyping Windows-based Ultra-Portables from startups like OQO a year ago, but he has drastically changed his thinking about the Ultra-Portable computer market. He thinks current market dynamics greatly favor Linux over Windows in the Ultra-Portable industry. Here’s why.

ThinkFree Office: Running on Ubuntu 8.04!

Filed under
Software

jonreagan.wordpress: ThinkFree is a company, which for the longest time, has offered their free online office suite, much like Google docs or Zoho Office. On April 7, things changed…

How Google could Win the OS Wars

Filed under
OS

Matt Hartley: For a number of years now, Google has been waging a battle to win over your desktop without ever settling for one OS platform. Opting to play it safe by not entering the platform wars, but what if they were to put this mindset aside, and find themselves in a position to take on Microsoft in a more direct way? I think they might be able to make it work, so long as they utilize the following commonsense strategy.

Also: gOS Goes with Awn!

Free/Open-source Optical Disk Authoring Software

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: Optical disc authoring software, most commonly known as CD/DVD burning application is computer software for authoring optical discs such as CD-ROMs and DVDs. Here are some of the finest free/open-source optical disk authoring software:

ManiaDrive - a (slightly crazy) arcade car game

Filed under
Gaming

fosswire.com: ManiaDrive describes itself as “an arcade car game on acrobatic tracks, with a quick and nervous gameplay (tracks almost never exceed one minute)” and also as a clone of Trackmania. What I can tell you is that ManiaDrive is a lot of fun, and extremely addictive at that.

Use Wubi to install Ubuntu without partitioning

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux.com: You can install and run Ubuntu from within Windows without any risk of accidentally deleting your existing programs and files by using Wubi, an unofficial Ubuntu installer for Windows users.

Ubuntu 7.10 vs. Ubuntu 8.04 Benchmarks

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Back in December we looked at the initial Ubuntu 8.04 Alpha 2 performance by comparing it to Ubuntu 7.10. Now that we're nearing an end in this development cycle as Ubuntu 8.04 LTS (Hardy Heron) will be released later this month, we've ran a new set of benchmarks comparing the latest Ubuntu 8.04 packages to the previous Gutsy Gibbon release.

Also: Microsoft.com vs. Ubuntu.com

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Delete Files Permanently & Securely with Shred & SecureDelete

  • Clean up Duplicate Files, Symlinks, Directories in Ubuntu with an easy GUI
  • Recover Deleted Files with Foremost
  • Howto:Recover and Undelete files in Ubuntu the easy way
  • Secure Data Destruction
  • ip command cheat sheet
  • How I Rip and Encode MP3s on the Ubuntu Linux Command Line
  • Creating a dropdown list in OpenOffice Calc that references a list of values

Review: Pidgin Flies Between Linux and Windows

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: We live in a cross-platform world. People work in front of their Windows PCs all day long, then go home to their Mac. Or they code at their Linux terminal then unwind with games on their Windows box. Unfortunately, for as many cross-platform people as there are, it doesn't always seem like there's a lot of software built to follow them from machine to machine. One exception is Pidgin.

Four Things Linux Needs

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Mike Gunderloy's post on FOSS Factory got me thinking about what Linux needs to gain mass market acceptance. After thinking about it, I've come up with a list of four things that the Linux community needs that aren't (as far as I know) yet in the works.

New AbiWord looks solid but suffers from age-old Linux problem

Filed under
Software

linux.com: In this age of multi-core processors and 3-D desktops, some people still get work done on old resource-strapped single-core machines, thanks to programs like the AbiWord word processor. The latest stable AbiWord 2.6.0 release was unveiled last month.

Wanted, Dead or Alive: Open Source Monetization

Filed under
OSS

technocrat.net: While I was retching my heart out one of the commenters brought up the idea of "bounties" as a business model for open source development. That idea has been tried repeatedly, commercially. As far as I know there are still some companies that do that. For the most part it doesn't work and can't work for both practical and theoretical reasons.

GIMP 2.5 Developmental Release

Filed under
GIMP

gimp.org: GIMP 2.5.0 is the first release from the 2.5 development series. It gives developers and interested users a view into the current development towards GIMP 2.6.

Evolution - Moving Away from Thunderbird

Filed under
Software

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm.org: I have been using Thunderbird for quite a while now. It’s a great e-mail client and the fact that you can use it on multiple platforms made it a winner for me. I carry a USB-drive around with Portable Thunderbird on it. But… Thunderbird was starting to give me a few headaches.

The Perfect Server - Mandriva 2008 Spring Free (Mandriva 2008.1)

Filed under
MDV
HowTos

This is a detailed description about how to set up a Mandriva 2008 Spring Free (Mandriva 2008.1) server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Summit: Linux Advances Into Enterprise, Seeks Better Fix For Bugs

  • New Drupal Book Published
  • What's the Smallest Computer that Runs Linux?
  • Firefox 3 ignore extension compatibility checking is wrong
  • The Linux Window of Opportunity Has Closed, Maybe for Good
  • A Good (Linux) Foundation to Build On
  • The Open Source Commandments
  • Don't show me the money. Show me the CODE!
  • New Cylinder Effect For Compiz Fusion
  • How to Mitigate the Risks Associated with Open Source Code
  • Microsoft gets a new open-source chief
  • Updates on Hardy Heron
  • Software giants crowding roundtable at ISO
  • Construction firm turns to open source for systems management
  • Open source launches attack on software patents
  • ThinkFree Office: Powerful, familiar office suite for Windows, Mac, and Linux
  • Manslide - a slideshow generator for Linux
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More in Tux Machines

CORD becomes a Linux Foundation project

Central Office Re-architected as a Data Center (CORD), an open source integrated solutions platform for service providers leveraging merchant silicon, white boxes, and open source platforms such as Open Network Operating System (ONOS), OpenStack, Docker, and the cloud operating system XOS, is now part of the Linux Foundation as a new independent project. The Linux foundation is already home to many open source networking projects, including OpenDaylight and ONOS, so CORD is a natural fit for the non-profit foundation. Read more

Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system. Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system. Read more

Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

There's an old adage in the open source world – if you don't like it, fork it. This advice, often given in a flippant manner, makes it seem like forking a piece of software is not a big deal. Indeed, forking a small project you find on GitHub is not a big deal. There's even a handy button to make it easy to fork it. Unlike many things in programming though, that interaction model, that simplicity of forking, does not scale. There is no button next to Debian that says Fork it! Thinking that all you need to do to make a project yours is to fork it is a fundamental misunderstanding of what large free/open source projects are – at their hearts, they are communities. One does not simply walk into Debian and fork it. One can, on the other hand, walk out of a project, bring all the other core developers along, and essentially leave the original an empty husk. This is what happened when LibreOffice forked away from the once-mighty OpenOffice; it's what happened when MariaDB split from MySQL; and it's what happened more recently when the core developers behind ownCloud left the company and forked the code to start their own project, Nextcloud. They also, thankfully, dropped the silly lowercase first letter thing. Nextcloud consists of the core developers who built ownCloud, but who were not, and, judging by the very public way this happened, had not been, in control of the direction of the product for some time. Read more

Proprietary and Microsoft Software