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Monday, 25 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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New Chart features in OpenOffice.org 3.2

Filed under
OOo

blogs.sun.com: Interested in the new Chart features that will be available in OOo 3.2? Have a look: Another new chart type in OpenOffice.org 3.2 is the Filled Net Chart. Bubble Chart is available as new chart type now. Bubble Charts are similar to the XY Charts.

Open Source Enthusiast To Advise Conservatives

Filed under
OSS

eweekeurope.co.uk: Tom Steinberg, co-founder of mySociety, the site behind online tools such as TheyWorkForYou.com has agreed to help the Conservative party

More Linux Distros That Don’t Suck

Filed under
Linux

tech.nocr.at: Following Linux Distros That Don’t Suck from earlier this year here is a comprehensive list of, you guessed it, more Linux Distros that don’t suck.

Karmic Koala: The best Ubuntu Linux ever?

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Karmic Koala: The best Ubuntu Linux ever?
  • Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope on Lenovo G450
  • Why Matt Zimmerman must not quit Ubuntu.
  • Screenshots Tour of Ubuntu Karmic Koala 9.10 Beta
  • Fixing Packaging in Linux #1

What makes Ubuntu so user friendly?

Filed under
Ubuntu

ghacks.net: Of all the Linux distributions, the consensus is beginning to become clear that Ubuntu is, hands down, the most user friendly of the Linux distributions. Naturally there are people that claim other distributions like PCLinuxOS, and Linux Mint are even more user-friendly than Ubuntu. But what exactly makes a Linux distribution user-friendly?

Mozilla augments Firefox's plug-in check

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: As it promised, Mozilla has created a page that checks for outdated plug-ins used by Firefox.

Some of Maryland's open source heroes

Filed under
OSS

baltimoresun.com: Mike Subelsky shares with us his non-scientific findings on who's doing a lot of novel work with open source. Feel free to nominate your own "open source heroes" in the comments section of this blog entry.

KDE 4.3.2 Available

Filed under
KDE

kdenews.org: The KDE community today proudly announces the immediate availability of KDE 4.3.2. As with any minor release, there are no new features but a strong concentration on further polishing the 4.3 series.

Upgrading a Motherboard in Linux: Kernel Panic

Filed under
Hardware

linuxplanet.com: I spent the weekend installing a new motherboard in my audio/video production computer. What should have been a 30-minute chore turned into a vexing showstopper.

Gmail Notifier Applets for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: Given the popularity of Gmail, it’s not surprising that a score of desktop applets have emerged for notifying users of new messages. I recently set out on a quest to find the best one. Here are the results.

The Open Source Initiative’s corporate status is suspended

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group.com: The ability of the Open Source Initiative to steward the Open Source Definition and police the use of the term open source as it relates to software is in doubt following the confirmation that the corporate status of the non-profit company has been suspended in California. What does it all mean?

A Free Open Source Alternative to Microsoft Visio

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Do you diagram? Chart? Maybe you sketch room layouts or wiring schematics? How about flow charts? Well I think we have a solution!

learning a new shell: zsh

Filed under
Software

xylld.wordpress: So I’ve decided to start learning a new shell. I see so much talk about zsh and finally, I’m going to attempt to learn to use it. I installed it and started using it and a few things are immediately different.

Linux Mint, the perfect starter OS for Mac and Windows refugees.

Filed under
Ubuntu

"The window effects are exactly what a Mac user would expect, and pressing the big green button at the bottom-left corner of the screen reveals a Windows-like Start Menu -- but better. Much better." Read more...

My Slackware 13 review

Filed under
Slack

pdavila.homelinux.org: Well Slackware 13 was released a few weeks back and I had a chance to install it on my laptop. The install is pretty quick (as most Linux installers are these days). I’m not going to get too detailed so I’ll list what I liked and didn’t like.

Firefox 3.6 beta set to ship next week

Filed under
Moz/FF

theregister.co.uk: Mozilla tentatively plans to release the first beta of Firefox 3.6 on 13 October. The open source browser maker is expected to spin out the next iteration of Firefox in November, and next week’s upcoming beta is understood to be the only test build.

KDE Akademy 2010 Dates Announced

Filed under
KDE

kdenews.org: Last week Adriaan de Groot, Claudia Rauch and Kenny Duffus visited Tampere, Finland representing KDE. This gave a chance to meet face to face with members of the local team and talk about next summer's Akademy 2010 conference.

Which Linux do you tell n00bs to use?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: As you were frantically pounding away at your keyboard, your workmate asks what sort of operating system you are using. Your eyes light up, you switch to evangilistic mode and start spouting the benefits of Linux.

Open Source Makes Big Gains at the London Stock Exchange

Filed under
Linux
OSS

computerworlduk.com: At first sight, news that the London Stock Exchange (LSE) is moving from the Microsoft .Net-based TradElect to the GNU/Linux-based MillenniumIT system, is just another win for free software. But the details provide some fascinating insights.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.14-rc2

I'm back to my usual Sunday release schedule, and rc2 is out there in all the normal places. This was a fairly usual rc2, with a very quiet beginning of the week, and then most changes came in on Friday afternoon and Saturday (with the last few ones showing up Sunday morning). Normally I tend to dislike how that pushes most of my work into the weekend, but this time I took advantage of it, spending the quiet part of last week diving instead. Anyway, the only unusual thing worth noting here is that the security subsystem pull request that came in during the merge window got rejected due to problems, and so rc2 ends up with most of that security pull having been merged in independent pieces instead. Read more Also: Linux 4.14-rc2 Kernel Released

Manjaro Linux Phasing out i686 (32bit) Support

In a not very surprising move by the Manjaro Linux developers, a blog post was made by Philip, the Lead Developer of the popular distribution based off Arch Linux, On Sept. 23 that reveals that 32-bit support will be phased out. In his announcement, Philip says, “Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that v17.0.3 ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Manjaro Linux. September and October will be our deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported.” Read more

Korora 26 'Bloat' Fedora-based Linux distro available for download -- now 64-bit only

Fedora is my favorite Linux distribution, but I don't always use it. Sometimes I opt for an operating system that is based on it depending on my needs at the moment. Called "Korora," it adds tweaks, repositories, codecs, and packages that aren't found in the normal Fedora operating system. As a result, Korora deviates from Red Hat's strict FOSS focus -- one of the most endearing things about Fedora. While you can add all of these things to Fedora manually, Korora can save you time by doing the work for you. Read more

BackSlash Linux Olaf

While using BackSlash, I had two serious concerns. The first was with desktop performance. The Plasma-based desktop was not as responsive as I'm used to, in either test environment. Often times disabling effects or file indexing will improve the situation, but the desktop still lagged a bit for me. My other issue was the program crashes I experienced. The Discover software manager crashed on me several times, WPS crashed on start-up the first time on both machines, I lost the settings panel once along with my changes in progress. These problems make me think BackSlash's design may be appealing to newcomers, but I have concerns with the environment's stability. Down the road, once the developers have a chance to iron out some issues and polish the interface, I think BackSlash might do well targeting former macOS users, much the same way Zorin OS tries to appeal to former Windows users. But first, I think the distribution needs to stabilize a bit and squash lingering stability bugs. Read more