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Monday, 24 Jul 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2014 - 2:52am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2014 - 2:51am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2014 - 2:51am
Story Make Your Mark on the World With Linux Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2014 - 2:31am
Story XnConvert Review – An Image Batch Processor like No Other Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:43pm
Story Season of KDE Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:38pm
Story Linux Mint 17.1 "Rebecca" MATE Stable Is Ready for Download – Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:32pm
Story KWayland Server Component Coming For KDE Plasma 5.2 Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:27pm
Story Where is M13? Review – A Simple and Powerful Galactic Atlas Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:16pm
Story Raspberry Pi and Coder by Google for beginners and kids Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:13pm

CrossOver Linux 8.0.0 review

Filed under
Software

wine-reviews.net: CodeWeavers has released the latest version of its CrossOver software for Mac and Linux users. If you want to try working without Windows but can't live without a must-have Windows app, CrossOver just might be the answer.

Linux Games: Eschalon Book I

Filed under
Gaming

ghacks.net: In this entry to the Linux Games department I am going to introduce you to a very fine RPG entry created by Basilisk Games called Eschalon Book I. This game is one of the few full-blown RPG games available for Linux, Windows, and OS X. Eschalon Book I won the 2007 Indie game of the year and with good reason. It’s well done.

Why FreeBSD 8 Won't Rewrite the Book

Filed under
BSD

internetnews.com: A major release of an operating system typically brings significant changes that require users to learn new skills. But backers of the open source FreeBSD 8 operating system say that's not necessarily going to be the case with its next major version.

Vector Linux 6.0 Gold Review

Filed under
Linux

techexposures.com: Vector Linux is a popular Linux Distro whose motto is “speed, performance, stability”. Version 6.0 was released in February 2009. Their stated goal is to “Keep it simple, keep it small and let the end user decide.”

Banshee as a Platform?

Filed under
Software
  • Banshee as a Platform?

  • Netbook UI, photo management coming to Banshee media player
  • Mono makes headway on the Linux desktop

Apache and the future of open-source licensing

Filed under
OSS

news.cnet.com: If most developers contribute to open-source projects because they want to, rather than because they're forced to, why do we have the GNU General Public License?

PC maker Everex closes up shop in the US

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

liliputing.com: Everex was one of the first companies to offer a netbook in the US.

The need to expand open-source licensing

Filed under
OSS

sdtimes.com: In his seminal essay on the nature of open source, entitled “The Cathedral and the Bazaar,” Eric Raymond described the Linux community as a “great babbling bazaar of differing agendas.” This work contributed to the present situation in which OSS has lost its edginess and is now commonly accepted by even conservative companies.

What I Like About Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

schoollibraryjournal.com: There are camps of people who use different browsers and have long-winded, heated arguments over which one is best. If a tool can make my life simpler, more efficient, and fun, I’m more likely to use it. Firefox 3 fits the bill

Text Mode Linux Applications

Filed under
Software

lightlinux.blogspot: During the first year of blogging for Lightweight Linux, I have written about many useful text mode applications. Here is a short overview of the applications I have written about.

Ubuntu’s Karmic Koala Needs You

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxologist.com: The Canonical Design team is currently running a contest for beautiful desktop wallpapers for its upcoming Ubuntu Karmic Koala 9.10 scheduled to be released in October 2009. They have created a photo pool on Flickr where you can submit or just browse proposed backgrounds.

Linux and the Brick and Mortal Establishment

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: One of the things that many people don't realize when complaining about the lack of Linux powered machines in Brick and Mortar (B&M) establishments is the one thing that's kept Windows the dominant player for ages.

Second edition of Mandriva Linux One 2009.1 released

Filed under
MDV

h-online.com: The Mandriva developers have released a second edition of their Mandriva Linux One (MLO) 2009.1 LiveCD. It includes all of the available security and maintenance updates up to the 10th of July

An Interview with Valerie Aurora: File System Evangelist

Filed under
Interviews

linux-mag.com: Jeff Layton talks to Valerie Aurora, file system developer and open source evangelist, about a wide range of subjects including her background in file systems, ChunkFS, the Union file system and how the developer ecosystem can chip in.

Do We Need a New Distro for Everything?

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: Saying I need a distribution just to save power is like saying I need a distribution to keep my cat off of my computer.

Has Debian lost control of its distribution?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: Ubuntu is a very well known Linux distribution. Those who have an interest in those things also know that Ubuntu is based on Debian. Now I am noticing that whatever direction Ubuntu is going, Debian is starting to follow.

KDE 4 Rough Edges

Filed under
KDE

troy-at-kde.livejournal: Well, after being back in the saddle for a bit, I've drawn a few conclusions, good or bad, about the current status of KDE and KDE 4 more specifically. This is derived from my interactions with users, and monitoring of KDE related feedback on the net.

Ubuntu 9.10 Preview: Kernel Mode Setting

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Kernel mode setting will be enabled by default for Intel-based video cards on Ubuntu 9.10, set to be released in October. I recently played around with this new feature on a Karmic Koala live CD.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Penumbra Collection $5 Weekend Sale!

  • Mono: Why is Debian resorting to spin?
  • Open-source extremism, and how the OSI can help
  • hardware4linux is back online
  • Reputation key to success in an open source world
  • Chrome OS, Android, and Other Trends Boost Open Source Jobs
  • Red Hat's Open Source Cloud Forum--Free Online, Top Speakers
  • Career advice: Preparing for life after the recession
  • Evolving Partner Programs: Microsoft vs. Red Hat
  • Microsoft's Azure cloud price pipped by Amazon's Linux
  • Vibrant Community Propels KDE Forward at Akademy 2009
  • Recession-Proof Open Source

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Code Project: Tower of Hanoi in Python

  • The Forgotten Power of Unix Text Utilities
  • Install mod_security for better Apache security
  • Securing Linux – A Crash Course in iptables
  • Tech Tip: Extract Pages From a PDF
  • Installing Webmin: for admins that like it GUI
  • Get started with Fetchmail, Procmail and Dovecot
  • PHP and nginx on Ubuntu: the easy way
  • How to backup and upgrade drupal to latest version
  • A Collection of Linux Tips and Tricks
  • Gentoo - Using Masked Packages
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More in Tux Machines

KDE's Plasma 5.10.4 in Chakra GNU/Linux

15 ways to empower students with open source tools

Recently I read the fascinating book Empower: What Happens When Students Own Their Own Learning, by John Spencer and A.J. Juliani. The book led me to think more deeply about my teaching methods and how I like to learn. I think learning should be exciting, and I'm happiest when I'm actively engaged in what I'm doing. Why wouldn't students in our schools want anything different than that? And why aren't we doing more to give that experience to them? While many schools today have a 1:1 ratio of computers/tablets to students, most of them use platforms and software that allow little (if any) modification. Students can't tinker with the software or hardware. Yet tinkering and experimenting are at the heart of learning. The authors of Empower say that students in environments that foster "making" take ownership of their learning more readily and tend to be deeper thinkers who are more at home with frustration. Ultimately, they wrote, "makers are better equipped for life." Read more

Red Hat Upgrade and Insider Selling

OSS: Yandex, The Open Source Way, Machine Learning, and BSD

  • In Other API Economy News: Yandex Open Source Machine Learning Library and More
    We start your weekend off with a review of the stories we couldn’t cover with a look at what what going on in the world of APIs. We start off with news that Yandex, the Russian search engine company, has announced that they are open-sourcing CatBoost, a machine learning library. The library is based on gradient boosting, a machine learning technique described by TechCrunch as being “designed to help “teach” systems when you have a very sparse amount of data, and especially when the data may not all be sensorial (such as audio, text or imagery), but includes transactional or historical data, too.” Yandex is freely releasing CatBoost for anyone to use under an Apache License. This move is similar to what we saw from Google when they open sourced TensorFlow in late 2015. As the demand for artificial intelligence solutions backed by machine learning platforms continues to grow, moves like this serve to help a wide range of developers take advantage of the technology.
  • CatBoost: Yandex's machine learning algorithm is available free of charge
  • The Open Source Way
    "Open source", in the world of IT, is program code that is meant for collaboration and open contribution. Intended to be modified and shared, because by design and spirit, it is meant for the public at large. It’s been said that “"open source" intimates a broader set of values—what we call "the open source way." Open source projects, products, or initiatives embrace and celebrate principles of open exchange, collaborative participation, rapid prototyping, transparency, meritocracy, and community-oriented development.” So it is a natural conclusion that in this age of open and transparent government, that the government IT manager or technician would be one of the first to want to embrace this new role of collaborative team member within a larger community. Additionally, as organizations, especially government, continue to emerge from the technology funding embargo of the Great (2008) Recession - an economic force that froze IT purchases and programs and forced many into strict “keep the lights on” operational mode, IT managers and CIO’s are carefully expending their still relatively measly budgets. [...] For IT organizations, especially government, with limited budgets and long procurement processes, time and increased experience with open source products will lead to a growing understanding and acceptance. And as this understanding progresses and becomes more accepted, open source will become a “go to” option to keep up with the fast moving technical environment, and perhaps eventually, as a standard first option, realizing the broader set of open source values by relying on the collective work and minds of a virtual community of IT “hackers”, “geeks” and “nerds”, working globally, 24x7/365 to explore, develop and showcase whatever tech that sparks their individual interest.
  • Top 5 open-source tools for machine learning

    Given the paradigmatic shifts that a true revolution in machine learning could bring, it’s important to maintain tech’s devotion to open-source. These kinds of scientific advancement don’t belong to any one company or corporation, but to the whole world. Making ML open and evenly distributed means everyone can join in this revolution.

  • Release of TinySegmenter 0.3
    Today I released version 0.3 of TinySegmenter, a Japanese Tokenizer in pure Python (released in New BSD license), with a single minor fix for proper install on systems not-using UTF-8 (apparently that still exists! :P). Thanks to Mišo Belica for the patch. Apparently some of his Japanese users are using it for Sumy, his software to extract summary from texts.
  • BSDTW 2017 CFP
     

    BSDTW 2017 will be held on the 11th and 12th of November 2017 (Sat/Sun), in Taipei. We are now requesting proposals for talks. We do not require academic or formal papers. If you wish to submit a formal paper, you are welcome to, but it is not required.

    The talks should be written with strong technical content. Presentations on the use of BSD in products and companies are strongly encouraged but marketing proposals are not appropriate for this venue.