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Thursday, 14 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Nautilus Just Got Gorgeous
  • Radio Tray- An online radio streaming player
  • Distro Here & There, But Nary a Good KDE 4 Distro Anywhere?
  • Should Ubuntu include proprietary software?
  • Open Source Helps Earthquake Victims in Haiti
  • IBM Client for Smart Work with Ubuntu support released
  • The Computer Action Show! S02E02
  • Gentoo Prefix: ARM hardware
  • Google, China, and the future of freedom on the global Internet
  • Nokia Booklet 3G review

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Configure Apache as a Forward / Reverse Proxy
  • Use iptables to block access using mac address
  • How to Setup Transparent Squid Proxy Server in Ubuntu
  • One key to Quick Setup fresh installed Ubuntu with Ailurus
  • Hidden Linux : NetHogs
  • Slidy : How to create an HTML Slideshow
  • Restart USB in Ubuntu Jaunty/Karmic
  • Catfish - file search tool that support several different engines
  • Easy Linux backup software with Time Machine like functionality
  • Auto shutdown your computer in Linux
  • GNU/Linux: rdesktop - Working on a Windows Based PC Remotely

Steps to adopt open source standards draw flak

Filed under
OSS

indiatimes.com: India’s open source software lobbyists allege that the country’s proposed draft recommendations for adopting open technology standards and software for automating different government departments and functions, favours popular software solutions from large companies such as Microsoft.

Linux and USB 3.0

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxplanet.com: The newest, fast interface, USB 3.0, is finally out, but only one operating system has native support for it: Linux.

ext4: prime time in three years, says Ts'o

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: It will take about two or three years for the ext4 filesystem, that has been adopted as the default by some community GNU/Linux distributions, to be routinely deployed on production systems, according to senior Linux kernel hacker Theodore Ts'o.

The Disney Ptex library has been released as open source under the BSD license

Filed under
Software

cgsociety.org: The Disney Ptex library is now available to the public community of texture artists, lighters and modelers.

Demystifying Open Source

Filed under
OSS

sys-con.com: In 2008, the open source community saw the year end with a headline-catching lawsuit, the Free Software Foundation files suit against Cisco for General Public License (GPL) violations. Not to be outdone, 2009 also ended with a bang. Best Buy, Samsung, JVC and 11 other consumer electronics companies were named in a copyright infringement lawsuit filed on December 14, 2009, by the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) on behalf of the Software Freedom Conservancy.

Opera 10.50 Alpha

Filed under
Software

lockergnome.com: The people at Opera Labs are being very careful with this release, and taking much time before going so far as to call a delivered product a beta. Another build, 3199, has been released as alpha, dropping the pre- from the moniker.

Linux command line tips

Filed under
HowTos

ghacks.net: I thought it would be useful to break away from all the GUI-goodness and offer up a few command line tips and tricks. Why? No matter how powerful, user-friendly, and modern the Linux desktop becomes, there may come a time when you want to step up your game and get down and dirty with the command line interface.

Lubuntu 10.04 Alpha 1 - Visual Overview

Filed under
Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: April 29th will see the release of new addition to the Ubuntu family. Joining Ubuntu, Kubuntu and Xubuntu will be a new lightweight version - Lubuntu.

Stable kernel tree status, January 18

Filed under
Linux

kroah.com: Here's the state of the -stable kernel trees, as of January 18, 2010.

Puppy Arcade 5 & Q&A with Scott Jarvis

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
Gaming

openbytes.wordpress: How things have changed today and the demand for retro gaming is reflected in the amount of emulation projects there are in progress. Puppy Arcade aims to provide all your retro computing desires. It’s based on tiny TurboPup Xtreme, which itself it a highly optimized version of Puppy Linux.

Ubuntu Desktop Alpha 2 and Alpha 3 Work Item Update

Filed under
Ubuntu

theravingrick.blogspot: As you are probably aware, in Lucid the platform team is working and re-planning in three separate milestones. Last week we passed the first such milestone, Alpha 2. The desktop team then re-planned for the next milestone, Alpha 3.

Vim Plugins You Should Know About, Part VI: nerd_tree.vim

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Software

catonmat.net: This is the sixth post in the article series “Vim Plugins You Should Know About“. This time I am going to introduce you to a vim plugin called “nerd_tree.vim“. It’s so useful that I can’t imagine working without it in vim.

Drupal's Dries Buytaert on Building the Next Drupal

Filed under
Interviews
Drupal

itworld.com: Among the many open source projects on the upswing is Drupal, a content management system written in PHP; Drupal has attracted a lot of attention from developers and mindshare among end users. This week, when Drupal 7 was about to go into Alpha test, I spoke with Dries.

ReactOS May Begin Heavily Using Wine Code

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: While we don't normally talk much about ReactOS, the free software operating system that was started some twelve years ago to provide binary compatible with Windows NT, there is a new proposal to abandon much of its Win32 subsystem that has built up over the past decade and to create a new Windows subsystem that in large part is derived from Wine code.

The Limits of Linux's 'Live Free or Die'

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Linux’s main merit, as a kernel and an ecosystem, is its open source nature. That means the software that runs on it has little choice but to be open source. This doesn’t mean closed-source software is unavailable on Linux—just that it’s got the deck stacked strongly against it.

A Preview of KDE 4.4

Filed under
KDE

maketecheasier.com: A highly anticipated release, KDE 4.4 has taken necessary steps to solidify the underlying Plasma technology of KDE 4 and add polish to the already shiny surface. This week, MakeTechEasier will take you on a preview of the upcoming KDE 4.4.

Health Check: Moonlight

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: Moonlight was written in three weeks in June of 2007 by a group of Mono developers working round the clock to fulfil a promise made by Miguel de Icaza. Their aim: to demonstrate Silverlight running on Linux at Microsoft's ReMIX conference show in Paris in the summer of that year.

Crowdsourcing the KDE Web Site

Filed under
KDE
Web

ostatic.com/blog: The KDE Project is taking a smart approach to reworking the KDE Website. Lydia Pintscher put out the call Sunday for contributors to pitch in with content and screenshots for one or more KDE programs by January 23rd.

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