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Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • My GNOME themes
  • MythTV 0.22 Release Approaches With RC2
  • Maddog: Three-in-one
  • Slackware Package Managers
  • Fedora 12 Beta on Thinkpad T500
  • Fedora 12 features
  • Super Linux Triage fest at Zareason HQ this weekend
  • Fixing Eclipse in Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala
  • Linux and Windows - one and the same?
  • DRI2 Sync + Swap Extensions Near Reality
  • Skype Open Source « in the near future »

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Installing and Using SNORT on Ubuntu
  • Install Flash & MM Support on Ubuntu
  • Mplayer Frontends (gnome-mplayer,Smplayer)
  • Omnet++ 4.0 : Installation
  • remove an alias - unalias
  • TCP Wrappers and xinetd

Experiencing Sabayon 5, oh!

Filed under
Linux
Gentoo

linuxforu.com: Sabayon’s strength has always been to showcase the power of FOSS on the desktop. Once upon a time, it used to come preinstalled with Linux-compatible games. But the current releases have done away with the idea of showcasing the games factor and concentrate on giving an out-of-the box desktop experience.

Sugar: The Cooler Desktop

Filed under
Linux

ujjwol.com.np: Most of you, Linux users have always been limited to the two big desktop names in Linux. GNOME and KDE today represent the Linux desktop. But one desktop was made with small screen and children in mind. Yes, the Sugar.

List of Slackware-based mini Distributions

Filed under
Slack

mysticalgr.awardspace: Following is a list of Slackware-based mini distro’s I’ve collected from various sources (wikipedia/distrowatch..) The need of such a list came when I was trying to find a Slackware-based mini distribution to install it in my usb pen-drive.

Apple Scuttles ZFS: Community Picks it Up

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: In like a lion, out like a Snow Leopard? Apple changed its spots on Sun's ZFS fairly quickly. This week the company shutterd the ZFS Project on Mac OS Forge, and there's no hide or hair of ZFS to be found in Snow Leopard. But as with all things open source, there's a light at the end of the tunnel.

Gedit: Don't Get Tricked by Its Simple Looks

Filed under
Software

softpedia.com: Every Linux user that has used the GNOME desktop environment must have had at least an encounter with its default text editor, Gedit. You start it up, and it looks like a simple notepad type application with a toolbar added on top. However, don't let yourself fooled by that simple appearance.

Phoronix 2009 Linux Graphics Survey

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: For the past two years we have hosted an annual Linux Graphics Survey in which we ask well over 20,000 users each time their video card preferences, driver information, and other questions about their view of the Linux graphics stack. This survey will run from 31 October to 30 November, 2009.

Open Source Whitepaper updated for 2010

Filed under
OSS

opensource.org: The paper is now 5 pages of text and 2 pages of references. It is still relatively concise, but the fact that the numbers keep showing double- and triple-digit improvements in important metrics (compared with proprietary software), I felt that it would only be fitting to expand the content and the data by a commensurate amount.

OpenSUSE Weekly News #95 is out!

Filed under
SUSE

news.opensuse.org: Issue #95 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out!

Things To Fix / Tweak After Installing Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala

Filed under
Ubuntu

Everybody posts about applications to install after upgrading to Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala. That's interesting, and some applications in those posts are quite useful. But those are just lists of applications like any other "Top 10 Ubuntu applications" list.

Firefox 3.6 Beta 1 review

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: Firefox 3.6 will be the smallest upgrade Mozilla has released to date. Before this, version jumps have been in the 0.5 (Firefox 1.0 to 1.5, 3.0 to 3.5) or 1.0 (2.0 to 3.0) order, and while version numbers are not mathematically representative, the slight 0.1 version increase reflects the overall tone of this update, and Firefox development in general which is moving to a faster release pace.

Syntensity: New FOSS Platform for 3D Games

Filed under
Gaming

linuxgames.com: An open-source platform for multiplayer 3D games, Syntensity, has recently launched:

A visit to Microsoft's first store

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet.com: Leaving the high desert mountains behind for a day I went Scottsdale’s Fashion Square mall, where the world’s first Microsoft no, make that Windows store opened.

full circle mag issue 30

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • full circle mag issue 30
  • Upgrading Ubuntu Linux made easy
  • Evoluent Vertical Mouse 3 Configuration in Ubuntu 9.10
  • Ubuntu 9.10 Unleashed, Amid Windows 7 & Snow Leopard
  • 5 Ways To Figure Out Ubuntu Version
  • Ubuntu: Revert to traditional boot splash in 9.10

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Just the Facts - Exporting Encryption Algorithms
  • GNOME and KDE development course
  • MythTV: Turning Linux Into a Digital Video Recorder: The Front End
  • Host it Your Way with OpenGoo Web Office
  • tour of firefox
  • Open source: Big value, not big money
  • Pimp Your Nautilus: NScripts 3.6
  • SAP committed to Apache projects
  • AutoZone Update
  • Monty's Almost Certainly Looking For Investment
  • Giving computers the boot
  • hoz: Take it apart, put it together
  • What Does Half of the Fortune 100 do when their Proprietary Software Dies?
  • Rwanda: Balton Eyes One Laptop Per Child Project
  • Linux an alternative for those who tinker
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2009.10.30
  • Linux Outlaws 119 - OggCamp Live Show (Uncut)

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install Subversion on Linux
  • Wireshark on Gentoo hardened
  • Ubuntu: Fine-tuning KDE app appearance in Gnome
  • How to Install Raid Array on a GNU Debian Linux Box
  • Quick and dirty guide to installing a LAMPP Server
  • 20 Linux Server Hardening Security Tips
  • Changing the default X Window in Linux - startx and .xinitrc
  • How to Create a Chat Server with Netcat
  • Steel Text plugin for Gimp
  • So how does the KDE PulseAudio support work anyway?
  • dropping $stuff onto plasma
  • Using sshfs with rtorrent
  • Nokia N95 bluetooth teethering with T-Mobile under Linux and Delll Latitude D630

First GNOME 3.0 Development Release Available

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: The much anticipated GNOME 3.0 release is coming in March, but the first development release (v2.29.1) for GNOME 3.0 (a.k.a. 2.30) is now available this week.

DebConf10 Debian Conference Set for August in NYC

Filed under
Linux

eweek.com: The Debian Project, the team behind the free Debian GNU/Linux operating system, has established August 1-7, 2010, as the dates and venue for its next annual conference, DebConf10.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug
    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.
  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read
    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so? Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking. It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.
  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation
    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.
  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security
    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes. Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.
  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?
    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support
    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.
  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month
    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch. One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux! Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.
  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux
    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'. Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.
  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone
    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable. Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.
  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support
    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows. This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Android Leftovers

Review: Google Pixel 2

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping. Read more