Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 17 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Getting Started in Open Source Software Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2015 - 7:50pm
Story Canonical to Support Two Ubuntu Versions, One Based on Deb and One on Snappy Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2015 - 7:43pm
Story Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) Gets Its First Linux Kernel Update Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2015 - 7:38pm
Story 5 Best Android Phones [May, 2015] Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2015 - 7:31pm
Story diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2015 - 6:47pm
Story 8 Linux Security Improvements In 8 Years Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2015 - 6:20pm
Story Linux from Square One Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2015 - 5:40pm
Story Explaining Security Lingo Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2015 - 5:29pm
Story ​EMC partners with Canonical, Mirantis, and Red Hat for OpenStack Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2015 - 5:06pm
Story Proprietary OOXML document format makes you more vulnerable to attacks Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2015 - 5:03pm

Why Canonical’s move to bring close-sourced applications to Ubuntu is a good thing

Filed under
Ubuntu

digitizor.com: A few days ago, there was a post in Ubuntu Forum asking for user’s feedback on what applications they would like to see in Ubuntu. The surprise part was that the list of softwares has close-sourced softwares. Of course this has created a lot of ruckus as Ubuntu has always been about open source.

2010: The Year the Desktop OS No Longer Matters?

ostatic.com/blog: Last Friday, Sam's Buffer Overflow run-down featured a piece by Walter Koenning discussing why campaigning hard for Linux on the desktop is selling open source -- and the operating system -- short.

Speak up!

Filed under
Linux

linuxuser.co.uk: Over the past couple of months, I’ve read several times and in several places about how Linux desktop usage makes us less than 1% of the worldwide operating system market. 1%! That’s nothing! We should all just give up and go home!

A Look At Ubuntu Lucid Plymouth Themes

Filed under
Software

webupd8.org: I've finally got Plymouth up and running on Ubuntu Lucid. Well, up and partially running - I only get to see the new Plymouth at shutdown, but considering I have an Nvidia graphics card and only installed Ubuntu Lucid in VirtualBox so far, I'll take what I can get.

A no-cost Windows killer: On Sale Now, only $26!

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

linuxtoday.com/blog: You just can't make this stuff up. This alleged news article at Technology Marketing Corporation (there is a clue in the site name) makes grandiose, breathless claims about Ubuntu:

Why Firefox Is Hardly Doomed

Filed under
Moz/FF

Stay away from OpenOffice.org until Oracle shows commitment, analyst says

Filed under
OOo

computerworld.com: A European IT consulting firm is warning large enterprises and government entities not to deploy OpenOffice.org until Oracle Corp. shows proof that it will invest as heavily in the development of open-source productivity suite as project champion Sun Microsystems Inc. did.

75% of Linux code now written by paid developers

Filed under
Linux

apcmag.com: Forget lofty ideals about the open-source community: most Linux kernel code is written by paid developers at major corporations.

A Monument for Bruno

Filed under
Linux

linuxlock.blogspot: Last week, I was notified that a long-time Linux Advocate is dying. I started my Linux career much later than most of you. I had to have a source of reference...a table where I could study this and learn as quickly as I could. I found it at brunolinux.

Linux in Real Life - Uses Around the World

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Even with its slowly growing popularity, Linux is still a largely unknown thing to many people. Why should Average Joe care about Linux? This alternative operating system doesn't affect his life at all - or does it? The truth of the matter is this: Almost every adult who uses technology in today's world uses or has used something that is Linux powered.

10 Blockbusters Made with the Help of Linux

Filed under
Linux
Software
Movies

linux-netbook.com: Linux is not only the ideal operating system for small screen devices like netbooks, but also a pretty good choice for the big screen. Several of the top blockbusters of all time were created with the help of Linux software or render farms running Linux.

Ubuntu Tweak 0.5 – Making life easier in Ubuntu

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

duncsweb.com: today i want to tell you about an application for Ubuntu, it’s an application that i would recommend to every Ubuntu user, newbie or pro because it makes life in Ubuntu a lot easier. It’s called Ubuntu tweak.

OpenOffice.org is “a piece of crap”–or is it?

Filed under
OOo

blog.lassehavelund: Recently, a report (PDF) on a number of students opinions on OpenOffice.org Writer vs. Microsoft Office 2007 Word and OpenOffice .org Impress vs. Microsoft Office 2007 Powerpoint, whose conclusion is down-right depressing to those of us, who would prefer to see open source software introduced into education. I sought out to attempt to see if I could confirm–or debunk–the comments made by the students.

Also: OpenOffice.org 3.2.0 Release Candidate 3 available

Still very cool: Debian floppy install

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: Say what you like about Debian or Ubuntu, but I think the floppy installation option was the coolest thing ever. I might be alone in that assessment, but I’m a bit sad that it doesn’t seem to be around for newer versions.

Kernel contributor says Linux community 'can be intimidating'

Filed under
Linux
  • Kernel contributor says Linux community 'can be intimidating'
  • LCA 2010: How FOSS spreads to the home
  • LCA 2010: Smooth sailing at halfway point
  • linux.conf.au 2010: day 3 (morning)
  • LCA2010 Wednesday Keynote

Fun with Boxee for Linux (Beta)

Filed under
Software

extremetech.com: Back in 2008, I looked at Boxee on the Apple TV. I thought this was a good time to take a look at Linux.

The Linux That Blew My Mind

Filed under
Linux

reviewglitz.com: I have always been searching for some amazing stuff from the linux world. And this time i was thunderstruck by one of them and that is

Do we really need all these different Linux distributions?

Filed under
Linux

locutus.us: If you have any inkling of the word Linux and know what it means then you most probably know that there are hundreds of Linux distributions floating around waiting for our attention. In reality there is no real functional difference between all of these Linux distributions.

Web code is already open - why not make it free as well

Filed under
Legal

Oh dear. After the debacle with Microsoft Poland’s apparent racist photoshopping, Microsoft China went and got the company in hot water for allegedly “stealing” code. Yes you read that right: Microsoft and wholesale “theft” of code from another website. Of course it’s not “theft” it’s copyright infringement but tomayto/tomarto.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

New: NuTyX 9.93 and Linux Mint 18.3

  • NuTyX 9.93 available with cards 2.3.105
    The NuTyX team is please to annonce the 9.93 release of NuTyX. NuTyX 9.92 comes with kernel LTS 4.14.6, glibc 2.26, gcc 7.2.0, binutils 2.29.1, python 3.6.0, xorg-server 1.19.5, qt 5.10.0, KDE plasma 5.11.3, KDE Framework 5.41.0, KDE Applications 17.12.0, mate 1.18.2, xfce4 4.12.4, firefox 57.0.2 Quantum, etc...
  • Linux Mint 18.3 'Sylvia' Xfce and KDE editions are available for download
    Linux Mint is killing the KDE version of its operaring system -- a move some people applaud. That's what makes the new 18.3 version -- named "Sylvia" -- so frustrating. It's bizarre to release a new version of an operating system that essentially has no future. But oh well, here we are. After a short beta period, the KDE distro is now available for download -- if you still care. I recommend that KDE loyalists just switch to Kubuntu or Netrunner, but I digress. Despite being the final version of Linux Mint KDE, it is still a great alternative to the consistently disappointing Windows 10. After all, it has been discovered that Microsoft is bundling a bug-ridden password-manager with its operating system without user consent! How can you trust such an OS?! Sigh.
  • Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" KDE and Xfce Editions Officially Released, Download Now
    The Linux Mint team released the final Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" Xfce and Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" KDE editions to download, as well as an upgrade for existing Linux Mint 18.2 "Sonya" users. Previously in beta, the Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" KDE and Xfce editions are now officially released and ready for production use. Just like the Cinnamon and MATE flavors, they are based on Canonical's long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system and use the Linux 4.10 kernel by default for new installations.

GNU: Glibc, GIMP, GCC

  • Glibc 2.27 Lands Yet More Performance Optimizations
    Earlier this month I wrote how Intel engineers have been busy with continuing to tune glibc's performance with FMA and AVX optimizations. That work has continued but also other architectures continue tuning their GNU C Library performance ahead of the expected v2.27 update. There has been a ton of optimization work this cycle, particularly on the Intel/x86_64 front. For those with newer Intel 64-bit processors, this next glibc release is shaping up to be a speedy update.
  • GIMP PIcks Up Support For The New Flatpak/FreeDesktop.org Screenshot API
    Hot off the release of the new GIMP 2.9.8 and ahead of the expected GIMP 2.10 release candidates that are expected to begin, a new addition to GIMP is a plug-in supporting the new FreeDesktop.org/Flatpak screenshot API. The org.freedesktop.portal.Screenshot specification aims to be a screenshot API that will work not only cross-desktop (e.g. KDE, GNOME, etc) but also work for sandboxed applications (i.e. Flatpak) and also work regardless of whether you are using Wayland or X11.
  • GCC Prepares For Fortran 2018 Support
    The Fortran committee decided last month to rename the upcoming Fortran 2015 programming language update to Fortran 2018. GCC support is being prepped. With this updated programming language technical specification not expected to be published until mid-2018, the committee behind this long-standing programming language decided to rename Fortran 2015 to Fortran 2018. Fortran 2018 should further improve interoperability with C code, improve its parallel programming capabilities, support hexadecimal inputs/outputs, and other improvements over Fortran 2008.

Security: Hackers, Back Doors, Microsoft Scam and Bots

  • Why Hackers Are in Such High Demand, and How They're Affecting Business Culture
    News headlines often focus on the hackers who launch cyber attacks and leak confidential data such as National Security Agency exploits, sensitive political emails, and unreleased HBO programming, but hackers can also affect organizations in positive ways. White hat hackers (as opposed to black hats) increasingly are finding employment in companies as security researchers. From conducting penetration tests and identifying vulnerabilities in software to providing companies with guidance about emerging threats, white hat hackers bring considerable value to organizations and play an instrumental role in helping them defend against today's advanced threats. White hats are highly coveted not only for their knowledge but also for their unique mindsets and ability to change corporate culture.
  • We need to talk about mathematical backdoors in encryption algorithms
    Security researchers regularly set out to find implementation problems in cryptographic algorithms, but not enough effort is going towards the search for mathematical backdoors, two cryptography professors have argued. Governments and intelligence agencies strive to control and bypass or circumvent cryptographic protection of data and communications. Backdooring encryption algorithms is considered as the best way to enforce cryptographic control. In defence of cryptography, researchers have set out to validate technology that underpins the secure exchange of information and e-commerce. Eric Filiol,  head of research at ESIEA, the operational cryptology and virology lab, argued that only implementation backdoors (at the protocol/implementation/management level) are generally considered. Not enough effort is being put into looking for mathematical backdoors or by-design backdoors, he maintains.
  • How a Dorm Room Minecraft Scam Brought Down the Internet
     

    Originally, prosecutors say, the defendants hadn’t intended to bring down the internet—they had been trying to gain an advantage in the computer game Minecraft.

  • Microsoft's Edge browser is in serious trouble
     

    Analytics firm Net Applications revised its methodology to cull bots from its browser share numbers and found that as much as half of the traffic to Edge on Windows 10 was artificially inflated.  

Mobile Linux: Tizen and Android