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Friday, 06 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Meet Mint's 'Cinnamon' srlinuxx 2 23/12/2011 - 6:30pm
Story Multi-Monitor Support In Ubuntu srlinuxx 23/12/2011 - 6:27pm
Story Open source: Pretty much right on track srlinuxx 23/12/2011 - 6:07pm
Story Linux Desktop Environment Round Up srlinuxx 1 23/12/2011 - 5:36pm
Story AMD Radeon HD 7970 On Linux srlinuxx 22/12/2011 - 11:48pm
Story Qupzilla – the Best Browser You’ve Never Heard of? srlinuxx 22/12/2011 - 11:46pm
Story Geek-in-Pink: Jonquil McDaniel, owner of xjonquilx srlinuxx 22/12/2011 - 11:44pm
Story 5 types of very annoying Linux users srlinuxx 22/12/2011 - 8:37pm
Story Chakra GNU/Linux Edn 2011.12 review srlinuxx 22/12/2011 - 8:36pm
Story Why Linux Desktop Makes Total Sense srlinuxx 22/12/2011 - 8:31pm

CLI Magic: A little script to customize directory listings

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Sometimes when I run ls to get a directory listing, I am looking for a specific file, but I want to see the whole context where the file resides. While you can pipe the output of ls to grep, that doesn't show you the whole directory with the matched files highlighted in a different color. I create a small script to do just what I want.

Poor typecasting

Filed under
Linux

manilastandardtoday.com: MODERN desktop Linux systems excel in many things, but font management is not one of them. Over the weekend, I brought home some OpenType fonts, eager to install them on my MacBook and my Linux desktop computer.

In Search of the GNU/Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Glyn Moody: It is generally accepted that 2008 will be the year of the GNU/Linux desktop – just like 2007, 2006 and all the years before them. But jokes aside, there is clearly something obsessive about the open source world's preoccupation with the desktop.

Virtual Users And Domains With Postfix, Courier And MySQL (CentOS 5.1)

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a Postfix mail server that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database.

Today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Remove Mono dependancy from Ubuntu

  • Red Hat's Open Source IDE
  • “I’d suggest Linux - but..” - I’d suggest you get a clue, but..
  • Hands on with Android: XML Parsing
  • Hospital software vendor McKesson uses Linux to heal IT budgets
  • ALSA's snd-oxygen For C-Media CMI8788 APUs
  • Daniel Robbins: And even more new Gentoo stages...
  • Process wakeups on GNOME 2.18
  • Seven Predictions for 2008

Test: Do Linux filesystems need defragmentation?

Filed under
Linux

lxer.com: When I started using Linux, I was told that with Linux I didn't need to defragment my filesystems anymore, since Linux filesystems don't get fragmented in first place. I still wondered how on earth it was possible the 100k+ files in Gentoo's portage system - updated every time I synchronize the portage tree - didn't fragment my filesystem. Or was my filesystem fragmented and did I not know?

Microsoft Office benched by Dutch government in favor of OpenOffice?

Filed under
OOo

tech.blorge.com: Though Microsoft has held a sturdy grip on the throat of government and corporate software for quite a while, the Dutch government is looking to pry away the bony fingers of Microsoft’s restrictive formatting; Dutch parliament will discuss mandating Open Document Formatting this Wednesday…hello, OpenOffice!

Puppy Linux 3.01 Review

Filed under
Linux

OSWeekly: I just finished taking the latest version of Puppy Linux for a spin and was planning on doing a review. However, considering this was on my notebook, that meant connecting to the Internet, preferably via wireless.

Microsoft Tight-Lipped On Unix Ownership Question

Filed under
Microsoft

informationweek.com/blog: For months, I've been trying to get Microsoft to answer a few questions about the Unix technologies in its intellectual property portfolio. Microsoft agreed to an interview, then backed out. So the question remains: How much Unix code does Microsoft have its hands on?

The Free Software Foundation's "High Priority" List: A Key Guidepost

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: Every couple of years, someone compiles a list of programs that GNU/Linux needs to compete on the desktop. However, if you really want to track the most pressing needs for a free desktop, the most useful indicator is probably the Free Software Foundation's (FSF'S) list of High Priority Free Software Projects.

"Cloudbook" UMPC to run Googlish Linux

Filed under
Linux

LinuxDevices: Everex has confirmed plans to ship a UMPC (ultra-mobile PC) with a 7-inch screen, similar to competitor Asus's EEE PC. A source close to the company revealed that the device -- codenamed "Cloudbook" -- will ship with the Google Apps-oriented "gOS" Linux distribution early next year.

Silly little gmrun

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: I think I may have found the program that actually does the least I’ve ever seen … short of things like cowsay. I forget what I was looking for, but I installed gmrun last night and tried it. This is what I got.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using a Bluetooth phone with Linux

  • Encrypt A File with GPG
  • Schedule And Automate tasks in Ubuntu
  • OOo: Doing page numbers with alternating pagination
  • Securing your VNC connection using SSH
  • Filter mail with powerful procmail
  • Create a Search Bar for Epiphany
  • Backing up a MySQL Database Using Cron
  • How To: Automate SSH Sessions Without Passwords
  • HowTo Backup and Restore Partitions Using CloneZilla or Partimage
  • Real world Linux programming
  • HowTo: Install 113 Amazing Fedora Games, Parts 2-8
  • Quickzi: Keep mounted drives off the Ubuntu Desktop

Eight features you didn’t know about in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

richbradshaw.wordpress: Ubuntu has caused GNU/Linux based operating systems to have many reviews recently, most concentrating on the more flashy parts such as the infamous rotating cube or wobbly windows provided by compiz fusion, rather than the things that actually make it such a enjoyable operating system to use.

New Flash player for Linux adds great features, slows playback

Filed under
Software

desktoplinux: It's good news, bad news situation when it comes to Adobe's new Flash player for Linux. On the plus side, Adobe Flash Player 9 Update 3, version identifier 9.0.115.0 was made available for Linux at the same time as Mac and Windows versions. It will, however, take a while for much of that content to appear in a format that you can get at.

Hans Reiser Said Wife, Family 'Were a Financial Burden,' Witness Says

Filed under
Reiser

wired: Two witnesses testified Monday at Hans Reiser's murder trial that the Linux programmer's wife and family were a burden, and that he would be better off without them.

Nemo file manager organizes around a calendar

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Nemo is the latest effort to provide a new paradigm for file managers. Its approach, at least in its first early development release, is to combine file management with calendar views.

KDE 4: like a dream on 256Mb/1Ghz/Intel

Filed under
KDE

kdedevelopers.org: So someone just asked in #kde4-devel whether it was worth trying KDE 4 on a 2500Mhz/256Mb computer and I was characteristically careful and guessed "It will work, but won't be good.". Then I decided to put my money where my mouth is.

Linux Media Player Roundup - Part 7 - Finale

Filed under
Software

raiden's realm: Welcome to the last part of our Linux media player roundup. Today we'll be covering VLC, XMMS, Xfmedia, Xine and one more previously missed media player, the "Listen Media Player".

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • OpenSSL patches two high-severity flaws
    OpenSSL has released versions 1.0.2h and 1.0.1t of its open source cryptographic library, fixing multiple security vulnerabilities that can lead to traffic being decrypted, denial-of-service attacks, and arbitrary code execution. One of the high-severity vulnerabilities is actually a hybrid of two low-risk bugs and can cause OpenSSL to crash.
  • Linux Foundation Advances Security Efforts via Badging Program
    The Linux Foundation Core Infrastructure Initiative's badging program matures, as the first projects to achieve security badges are announced.
  • Linux Foundation tackles open source security with new badge program
  • WordPress Plugin ‘Ninja Forms’ Security Vulnerability
    FOSS Force has just learned from Wordfence, a security company that focuses on the open source WordPress content management platform, that a popular plugin used by over 500,000 sites, Ninja Forms, contains serious security vulnerabilities.
  • Preparing Your Network for the IoT Revolution
    While there is no denying that IP-based connectivity continues to become more and more pervasive, this is not a fundamentally new thing. What is new is the target audience is changing and connectivity is becoming much more personal. It’s no longer limited to high end technology consumers (watches and drones) but rather, it is showing up in nearly everything from children’s toys to kitchen appliances (yes again) and media devices. The purchasers of these new technology-enabled products are far from security experts, or even security aware. Their primary purchasing requirements are ease of use.
  • regarding embargoes
    Yesterday I jumped the gun committing some patches to LibreSSL. We receive advance copies of the advisory and patches so that when the new OpenSSL ships, we’re ready to ship as well. Between the time we receive advance notice and the public release, we’re supposed to keep this information confidential. This is the embargo. During the embargo time we get patches lined up and a source tree for each cvs branch in a precommit state. Then we wait with our fingers on the trigger. What happened yesterday was I woke up to a couple OpenBSD developers talking about the EBCDIC CVE. Oh, it’s public already? Check the OpenSSL git repo and sure enough, there are a bunch of commits for embargoed issues. Pull the trigger! Pull the trigger! Launch the missiles! Alas, we didn’t look closely enough at the exact issues fixed and had missed the fact that only low severity issues had been made public. The high severity issues were still secret. We were too hasty.
  • Medical Equipment Crashes During Heart Procedure Because of Antivirus Scan [Ed: Windows]
    A critical medical equipment crashed during a heart procedure due to a timely scan triggered by the antivirus software installed on the PC to which the said device was sending data for logging and monitoring.
  • Hotel sector faces cybercrime surge as data breaches start to bite
    Since 2014, things have become a lot more serious with a cross section of mostly US hotels suffering major breaches during Point-of-Sale (POS) terminals. Panda Security lists a string of attacks on big brands including on Trump Hotels, Hilton Worldwide, Hyatt, Starwood, Rosen Hotels & Resorts as well two separate attacks on hotel management outfit White Lodging and another on non-US hotel Mandarin Oriental.

Android Leftovers

today's howtos