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Sunday, 26 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 2014's Best Distros, Buncha New Games, and Fedora Delayed Rianne Schestowitz 25/07/2014 - 7:02am
Story Raspberry Pi Model B+ review – a new evolution Rianne Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 8:13pm
Story Chromebooks Emerge as Major New Linux Force on Notebooks Rianne Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 8:03pm
Story PHP 5.5.15 Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 7:53pm
Story Raspberry Pi-based signage player sips 7 Watts Rianne Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 7:37pm
Story Dive in, penguins: Upstart builds Linux virtual SAN Rianne Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 5:12pm
Story LibreOffice 4.2.6 RC2 Now Ready for Testing Rianne Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 5:03pm
Story Linux Developers Jump Quickly On ACPI 5.1, Helps Out ARM Rianne Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 4:55pm
Story Pkg 1.3.0 Released To Improve Package Management On FreeBSD Rianne Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 1:42pm
Story GOG.com Now Supports Linux! Rianne Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 1:30pm

Make your Ubuntu distro look like the Mini Mi

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica.com: The GUI released by HP for its Mini Mi netbook has been winning accolades for its high design standards. Over at the Ubuntu forums, users are installing the HP Mobile Experience Interface on various Ubuntu distributions.

Why 100% Free Software Destroys Linux

Filed under
Linux

lunduke.com: If we take a stand that our Linux-based desktops must only consist of 100% free and open source software… Linux is doomed to failure.

Is Linux Cheaper on the Desktop Than Windows?

Filed under
Linux

serverwatch.com: No, this isn't another rant about how you should convert to Linux because it's free, although it is free. Free is a four-letter word among those who scoff at the mere mention of Linux. Yes, Linux is free, but that doesn't give it an unfair advantage on the desktop because most computers arrive preloaded with Windows — so to the buyer it appears Windows is also free.

Silverlight, via Moonlight, comes to Linux

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: If you're like me, you don't like proprietary video and audio codecs. Be that as it may, some sites, like NBC's Olympics site, use Microsoft's proprietary Silverlight streaming technology. Until recently, if you were using Linux that meant you couldn't watch videos from these sites at all. Until now.

Open Source is Already Naturally Green

Filed under
Movies
OSS
GIMP

linuxplanet.com: For years now, there's been talk brewing about the concept of Green IT. Pundits have predicted in years past that sustainable IT would be job one soon, really soon.

NVIDIA Pushes Out Another Binary Driver Update

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Two weeks ago NVIDIA released four new Linux drivers and then just a day later they released another driver. Well, NVIDIA has now pushed out yet another proprietary driver update.

Multiple shell management with GNU Screen

Filed under
Linux

Create and manage multiple shells on your console with GNU Screen

Rigs of Rods goes Open Source and Glest 3.2

Filed under
Gaming

freegamer.blogspot: Rigs of Rods is going open source. How cool is that? Glest 3.2 is out. Which is interesting given I proclaimed official Glest development dead.

Why "open source" is not "free software"

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Choosing to release a piece of software under the terms of a free software license is an important step. The myriad of licenses available can sometimes confuse and disorient the user, sometimes making this first step much harder than it should be. Let’s try and make things clearer.

Benchmarked: Firefox Javascript on Linux and Windows

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: As you might have guessed from our domain name, TuxRadar.com, we're big fans of Linux. But being a fan of Linux doesn't necessarily make you a Linux fanboy. We think more Linux users need to admit there are some places where Linux isn't quite as good as its competitors.

Avant Window Navigator 0.3.2: Form and Function on the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: I've used other dock applications in Linux, and while I've always liked the idea (and look), they were too rough around the edges for day to day use. I've been running AWN in lieu of the lower GNOME panel for several days, and I'm really pleased.

Is using Windows Dumb? It will be.

Filed under
Microsoft

aplawrence.com: That was a real question, asked by someone considering buying a new computer. It surprised me: I've been seeing more people asking if they should consider Mac or Linux, but this question goes way beyond that. It made me pause; the answer is complicated.

Linux has no domino effect

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: The domino effect. This means that when one part of an electronic component fails, the surrounding parts also fail. Just like a row of falling domino's. The same thing can also happen in software. Linux does not have this problem due to the nature of the operating system.

Miro 2.0... the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Filed under
Software

writemsg.blogspot: First lets start with the good news. The gui is much more responsive. Interacting with the sidebar is a smoother experience. Not only has the underlying code obviously been reworked but the look and feel has been overhauled too. It fits in with my GNOME desktop better than before.

Is Microsoft out to kill, rather than conquer netbooks?

Filed under
Microsoft

raiden.net: Microsoft has apparently changed it's mind about it's lineup of versions for Windows 7. So now, instead of a "netbook" version, they will apparently be offering their "starter" edition instead on notebooks. While they haven't said that verbally, their actions have spoken volumes about what they think of netbooks.

today's odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Is Open Source A Recession-Fighting Tool?

  • Fix a borked terminal
  • Why free trade results in less freedom
  • Better reasons to use Linux on the desktop?
  • How piracy benefits Microsoft
  • Open letter to Obama: Uncle Sam should go open source
  • Open-Source ATI Driver Nears New Release
  • Comux 000111 - Free can't be good
  • Opera Adds Carakan to Browser JavaScript Engine Wars
  • Cheaper OLPC promised
  • back to GNOME
  • Firefox vs. IE Smackdown, Mozilla Jumps at Microsoft's Jugular
  • The Good News, Linux Fans, is Venture Capital Is Harder to Find
  • Data recovery from a USB key
  • Nouveau Driver 2009 Status Update
  • Linux, Windows Seek Strength in Competition
  • MAPI 0.8, OpenChange, Evolution, and OpenSUSE 11.1
  • Interview: Wired’s Chris Anderson on the ‘free’ business model
  • Mozilla Developer News Feb 10
  • Linux Void: Episode 20 - Reacting
  • Open source security debated
  • Why KDE 4.2 should use Qt 4.5
  • Get Kannada Language displayed properly in Gentoo and Sabayon
  • Building the ultimate open set-top box
  • How to write a Linux virus in 5 easy steps
  • Making The Bash History More Useful
  • Red Hat CEO Kills Open Source Financial Myth
  • Russian Federation Commits to Red Hat Open Source

Minty fresh Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: In case you haven't guessed by now, I like desktop Linux. I admit though that Linux is stuck between a rock and a hard place when it comes to dealing with proprietary media formats. There are answers though to this problem and that's one of the reasons why I like the Linux Mint distribution.

German schools pilot remote virtual Debian/KDE desktops

Filed under
Linux
Software

linuxdevices.com: An educational software organization in Germany is pilot testing an educational software system based on virtualized Debian/KDE desktops, letting students and teachers access their desktops from home or school.

Giving console applications a bad name

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: Everybody knows what a console application is like: Sparse. Unfriendly. Terse. Mute. Spartan. It’s part of the code of console applications. It has to be this way. It is the law of the jungle. That’s why we, as computer users, can no longer allow a program like calcurse to exist.

5 Must-have Linux office applications

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: If you work in a business environment then you know the value of the office application. And if you have ever thought about using Linux in your office you know there are boundaries to adoption. The good thing is those boundaries are growing smaller and smaller with every year.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones. Read more