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Friday, 22 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Lighthouse SQ7 & NetWalker PC-Z1

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Linux Is Bloated. Does Anyone Care?

Filed under
Linux

serverwatch.com: As Linux grows up, it gains new features — and that's driven by what Linux users want. It's a bit like all those muffin-topped shoppers: They inevitably get fat, because they want fattening food.

40 years of Unix

Filed under
OS
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: 1969, the summer of love for most, was the summer of not having enough computer resources for AT&T Bell Lab employees Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie.

Red Hat to collide with Microsoft

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

news.cnet.com: For years, Red Hat has happily sold Linux to Unix shops anxious to save money at equivalent or better performance. During this time, the company largely avoided Microsoft, which has tended to compete much higher up the stack. No longer.

Use SUSE Studio to Build a Linux OS From Scratch

Filed under
SUSE

lifehacker.com: Think you can make a better fast-booting, Chrome-focused OS than Google? Want to craft a custom Linux system that boots from a USB stick? SUSE Studio gives you 15 GB to do exactly that, and you do it all online.

Ubuntu – good enough for grannies and girlfriends

Filed under
Ubuntu

shaneosullivan.wordpress: I recently installed Ubuntu Linux 9.04 on my girlfriends lovely new EEE Netbook), but left the original Windows install intact, because, well, I’ve always had a need to go back to Windows for 30 minutes at some point for some reason or another.

Why distributions shouldn’t ship development versions

Filed under
Linux

martin-graesslin.com/blog: At Desktop Summit Lubos asked me what openSUSE has to do that I will switch back to SUSE. I replied that I am satisfied with Kubuntu and so I don’t see any need to switch the distribution. So what has changed since July?

One For All and All For One: A Single Linux Distribution

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: The only problem I see with it is, which one are you gonna choose for THE distribution? Will it be SUSE, Debian, Red Hat, Gentoo, or Slackware? Since it has to be a top-level distribution and not a derivative, it will have to be one of those. Let's examine those choices.

Install Amarok 2.2 RC1 In Ubuntu Jaunty and Fedora

Filed under
Linux

I loved Amarok 1.4 and even used it in Gnome. Then, I really hated all the 2.x series until this 2.2 RC1. I thought I'd let you know how to install it in Ubuntu Jaunty (and Fedora, thanks to Fedora-ES).

Is There More Than Meets the Eye in Microsoft's Moblin Stance?

Filed under
Microsoft

ostatic.com/blog: Is Moblin, the open source mobile operating system initially launched by Intel and now overseen by the Linux Foundation, a potential thorn in Microsoft's side?

Acer Aspire One Linux Netbook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

zimbio.com: Netbooks have very much become an integral part of our hyperconnected lifestyles. One of the most affordable netbooks on the market today is the Acer Aspire One lineup.

Quake Live

Filed under
Web
Gaming

terminally-incoherent.com/blog: I should really stop finding new and exciting time wasters for myself. And yet, these things just keep finding their way into my browser somehow. My newest browser distraction is Quake Live.

How Will Users React to GNOME 3.0?

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: GNOME 2.28 was supposed to preview GNOME 3.0. But it hasn't quite turned out that way, and whether what is visible will leave users eagerly anticipating or uneasy and rebellious is still anybody's guess.

7 Best Free and Open Source Vector Graphics Editors for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: A software application that gives users the ability to compose and edit vector graphics images interactively on a computer is called a vector graphics editor. Here are some of the best Free and Open Source vector graphics editors:

Open Android Alliance formed

Filed under
OS

LinuxCon: Shuttleworth Video Online

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux-magazine.com: We posted the video of the LinuxCon Shuttleworth keynote online. Mark Shuttleworth replied to my email and has no comments to add at this time.

VectorLinux Light vs. Zenwalk: Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

tropicofvector.wordpress: I figured I could do a little benchmarking myself to see if my choice of lightweight Linux distribution could be substantiated by hard figures.

What if microsoft were to go Open Source?

Filed under
Microsoft

toolbox.com/blogs: A friend of mine who regularly comments on my blog, often stirring the pot with statements to make us think about what we are writing about, mentioned to me in an email about what the consequences would be if microsoft were to go Open Source.

…Not free as in fundamentalist

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: Matt Asay set the cat amongst the pigeons late last week with his post declaring that “Free software has lost. Open source has won." To my mind, there is actually a lot to agree with in Matt’s post but where it falls down is in its generalisation of the Free Software movement.

Explaining to girls

Filed under
Ubuntu

mdzlog.alcor.net: Yes, I was there, in person, at the event, in the audience, during the keynote. The remark in question was sexist, and although it may seem small in itself, it is representative of an attitude which is harmful to the community.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux panel PC offers IP69K protection against jet spray

TechNexion has launched a 10.1 inch, 1280 x 800 capacitive touch panel PC that runs Linux or Android on an i.MX6, and offers IP69K protection. TechNexion, which has long been a provider of COMs and SBCs based on Freescale/NXP i.MX SoCs, also sells a line of Linux- and Android-friendly i.MX6, i.MX6UL, and i.MX7 based panel PCs. The latest is a 10.1 inch TWP-1010-IMX6 model that shares many of the same features of its 15.6-inch TWP-1560-IMX6 sibling, including NXP’s i.MX6 SoC, M12 connectors, and a SUS 304 stainless steel case with an IP69K water- and dust-proofing certification. Read more Also: Mongoose OS for IoT prototyping

10 Open Source Skills, Data Analysis Skills and Programming Languages

  • 10 Open Source Skills That Can Lead to Higher Pay
    Last month, The Linux Foundation and the online job board Dice released the results of a survey about open source hiring. It found that 67 percent of managers expected their hiring of open source professionals to increase more than their hiring of other types of IT workers. In addition, 42 percent of managers surveyed said they need to hire more open source talent because they were increasing their use of open source technologies, and 30 said open source was becoming core to their business. A vast majority — 89 percent — of hiring managers said that they were finding it difficult to find the open source talent they need to fill positions.
  • If you want to upgrade your data analysis skills, which programming language should you learn?
    For a growing number of people, data analysis is a central part of their job. Increased data availability, more powerful computing, and an emphasis on analytics-driven decision in business has made it a heyday for data science. According to a report from IBM, in 2015 there were 2.35 million openings for data analytics jobs in the US. It estimates that number will rise to 2.72 million by 2020. A significant share of people who crunch numbers for a living use Microsoft Excel or other spreadsheet programs like Google Sheets. Others use proprietary statistical software like SAS, Stata, or SPSS that they often first learned in school.
  • std::bind
    In digging through the ASIO C++ library examples, I came across an actual use of std::bind. Its entry in cppreference seemed like buzzword salad, so I never previously had paid it any attention.

Visual revamp of GNOME To Do

I’m a fan of productivity. It is not a coincidence that I’m the maintainer of Calendar and To Do. And even though I’m not a power user, I’m a heavy user of productivity applications. For some time now, I’m finding the overall experience of GNOME To Do clumsy and far from ideal. Recently, I received a thank you email from a fellow user, and I asked they what they think that could be improved. It was not a surprise when they said To Do’s interface is clumsy too. Read more

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