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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Are Chromebooks hurting Apple as well as Microsoft? Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 8:08pm
Story Valve Ships An AMD Preview Driver For SteamOS Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 7:37pm
Story Where's Fedora 21 schedule? Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 7:23pm
Story KDE 4.11.5 Officially Released, Fixes over 65 Bugs Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 6:43pm
Story Linux 3.14 To Have PRIME Support For NVIDIA Tegra Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 6:27pm
Story MKXP: Open-Source, Linux Engine To RPG Maker XP Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 6:20pm
Story Transformer Book Duet offers Windows and Android in dual-boot mode Roy Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 5:23pm
Story Meet the Steamboxes (Gallery) Roy Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 5:19pm
Story 4 reasons companies say yes to open source Roy Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 4:41pm
Story CentOS Project joins forces with Red Hat Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 1:19pm

Introduction to Linux: Desktop Environments

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Software I've discussed what GNU/Linux is (commonly referred to as Linux), what it represents, why people use it and why more should. I've even touched on the subject that you can do almost anything in Linux that you may have taken for granted as being a purely Windows (or Apple) related functionality. For those who took my advice and played around with a Live CD, it must be like being lost in a foreign nation. Where's the Start button? Where's Windows Manager?

DTrace and the Linux bunker mentality

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blogs.zdnet: DTrace is an open source Sun product that made its debut with Solaris 10 but has since been ported to MacOS X and various other BSD derivatives. Only Linux is left without significant corporate or community support for a DTrace port. Instead the Linux kernel group has been working on a thing called SystemTap.

The open source jobs boom

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weblog.infoworld: Looking for a good job in IT? Sharpen your knowledge of open source development frameworks, languages, and programming. A just-published study of available IT jobs found that 5 percent to 15 percent of the positions now on the market call for open source software skills.

How gaming in Linux will bring the ultimate benefit to all

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dogbuntu.wordpress: The biggest reason I still dual boot my Ubuntu with Windows XP is Gaming. In fact the Windows XP in my desktop is used for no purpose absolutely except occassionally playing games.

Linux Users: Why So Serious?

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Linux Despite coming from a very rich and early history, linux OS consumer market share is less than 1% [1,2]; and the community more divided than ever. What are we doing wrong?

How To Install Django On Debian Etch (Apache2/mod_python)

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This tutorial explains how to install Django on a Debian Etch server. Django is a web framework that allows to develop Python web applications quickly with as much automation as possible. I will use it with Apache2 and mod_python in this guide.

today's leftovers

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  • Shell Script To Emulate A Thesaurus For Linux or Unix

  • Who says you can't make money in open source?
  • Kernel Log: Centrino 2 WiFi driver iwl 5000 and webcam driver gscpa in Linux 2.6.27
  • Red Hat Ups Length Of Top Technical Support For Enterprise Linux
  • Linux HOWTO: Video Editing Magic with ffmpeg
  • Using new social networking service from the command line
  • Sun Takes a Shine to Linux in New Web Stack
  • Giving love to the Previewer
  • SCO Blast From The Past
  • Vista Adoption going no-where, IT considering Linux and Mac instead
  • Linux answers the age-old question, "Why is my network slow?"
  • Ubuntu Classroom #1 at Engineering Faculty
  • OLPC and LEGO - A Match from Heaven?
  • Network Security Toolkit distribution aids network security administrators
  • 11 Firefox 3 Extensions That I Can’t Live Without
  • Video: Fedora Live
  • Killing the Desktop Metaphor with GNOME

Would a chic Linux seduce the masses?

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Linux Linux has lived a long life of stability and sturdy usability, but what if the underpinnings of that strategy fell away and the developer community were to welcome an influx of open source designers focused on producing the most pleasant and intuitive interface imaginable.

Software piracy hurts the open-source community too

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OSS Proprietary software vendors, movie companies and the music industry aren't the only businesses that don't like pirates stealing, copying and reselling their CDs and DVDs. community manager sees fallout when proprietary wares are jacked.

The new FreeBSD Core Team (2008-2010)

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BSD One of the major differences between FreeBSD and Linux, is that FreeBSD is coherent operating system, and that the building of it is steered and managed by a Core Team.

1st steps with PCLinuxOS 2007

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PCLOS I had so much trouble trying to reinstall Windows XP on my IBMX23 that I thought I’d see how I get on with PCLinux.

Network Monitoring with Zenoss: A Reluctant Administrator's Guide

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Software My household now has four physical computers, one of them dual boot. All are on a single internal Local Area Network. I also have two computers sitting in a box, which will probably be added to this mess soon, plus my wife plans to get a laptop. Like it or not, I now manage a network bigger than many small businesses! Surely, there must be a way to automate this mess?

GNOME 2.23.5 Released

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Software Here's the first release after GUADEC. The GNOME contributors actually managed to continue hacking on their modules. Amazing. Those people never stop. I guess it shows how passionate they are! So they made changes that are now visible in this latest version of GNOME.

Future Ubuntu names

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  • Jerking Jackass (9.04)

  • Kevlar Kiwi (9.10)
  • Lumbering Lama (10.04)

Veteran developer ditches Microsoft for open source

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OSS If you've ever used Microsoft Access or Excel, you have likely used a product that Mike Gunderloy had a hand in developing. The irony is that Gunderloy himself doesn't use those products anymore. He's given up Microsoft for open source -- and he's not going back.

Happy 10th birthday, Mandriva Linux

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MDV Yes, today - July 23rd, 2008 - is the tenth anniversary of the release of Linux-Mandrake 5.1, the very first public release of what is now Mandriva Linux. It was versioned 5.1 as it was a fork of Red Hat 5.1.

Also: Interview With Helio Chissini De Castro - Mandriva

Fedora adds collaboration tools

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  • Fedora Phones Home: Fedora Talk and Other Updates From the Community

  • Fedora adds collaboration tools
  • Developers Make a Good Call With Fedora Talk

Can the Linux desktop best the Mac desktop?

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blogs.computerworld: Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Ubuntu Linux, wants desktop Linux to "shoot beyond the Mac." Can it? Today's Mac OS X 10.5, Leopard, is a work of the user-interface designer art. This competition forces Linux desktops to evolve very quickly.

SuperTux, the Greatest Linux Game of All Time

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Gaming If you ask my 3 year old son what's his favorite Linux game of all time, he would start hopping and say SuperTux in a loud and superhero-like voice. I can't blame him for being such a SuperTux fanatic because when I was a kid, I was very much addicted to a game which SuperTux was based upon.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Rackspace and FOSS Report

  • The Rackspace State of Open Source
    As the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona kicks off, Rackspace has released a report entitled ‘The State of Open Source’. With every conference seemingly extolling the virtues of open source software, this report is timely. It manages to differentiate between enterprise open source and the wider open source software market.
  • Why digital transformation needs open source
    As if there wasn't already ample reason for businesses to switch to open source, Forrester analysts Paul Miller and Lauren E Nelson released a report in April 2016, entitled Open Source Powers Enterprise Digital Transformation — CIOs Need To Embrace Open Source Software To Drive Change, which further drives the point.
  • Despite Security Fears, Open Source Is Fuelling Innovation and Cost Savings in UK Businesses
  • Security concerns fail to hold back UK open source success
    However, despite its increasingly common use, many (54%) still perceive external security threats to be a big barrier to adoption, that’s according to a report published by Rackspace. The State of Open Source study, which was conducted among IT decision makers in UK businesses with over 1,000 employees and revenues over £500m, and looks at the ways open source is being used, its benefits, but also what is holding back adoption and business concerns. According to the report open source has come of age with 85% using open source technology to migrate a closed source project to open source. Open source also isn’t just a tool for small businesses; the vast majority (90%) of large businesses are now deploying open source-based enterprise applications, with 25% being completely open source. The reason for the growing adoption is because of the money and time savings. Rackspace found that for each project that had been migrated to open source technology, six out of ten organisations saved on average £30,146 and reduced project lifecycle by six months. Greater innovation was reported by many (49%), and 46% were driven to open source because of the competitive opportunities. Additionally, just under half (45%) said that it enabled them to get products and services to market faster. John Engates, Chief Technology Officer at Rackspace, said: “While open source technologies have been around for many years, it is great to see that enterprise businesses are finally dipping their toes in and seeing the tangible benefits.

FOSS and Blockchain

Security Leftovers

  • The internet apocalypse map hides the major vulnerability that created it
    During Friday’s massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on DNS service provider Dyn, one might be forgiven for mistaking the maps of network outages for images of some post-apocalyptic nuclear fallout. Screenshots from sites like showed menacingly red, fuzzy heat maps of, well, effectively just population centers of the United States experiencing serious difficulty accessing Twitter, Github, Etsy, or any of Dyn's other high-profile clients. Aside from offering little detail and making a DDoS literally into a glowing red menace, they also obscured the reality of just how centralized a lot of internet infrastructure really is. DNS is ground zero for the uneasy tension of the internet’s presumed decentralized resilience and the reality that as of now, translating IP addresses into domain names requires some kind of centralized, hierarchical platform, and that’s probably not going to radically change anytime soon. Other maps provided by various business to business network infrastructure companies weren’t much more helpful. These maps seem to exist mostly to signal that the companies in question have lots of cool data and that it can be made into a flashy map — which might impress potential customers, but that doesn’t offer a ton of insights for the layperson. For example, threat intelligence company Norse's map appears to be mostly a homage to the Matthew Broderick movie War Games: a constant barrage of DDoS attacks beaming like space invader rockets across a world map. Akamai has an impressive 3D visualization that renders traffic as points beaming into the atmosphere. And website monitoring service Pingdom offers a dot map at such a far-out zoom level that it's essentially useless for seeking out more meaningful patterns than "outages happen in population centers, also there are a lot of outages."
  • CoreOS Patched Against the "Dirty COW" Linux Kernel Vulnerability, Update Now
  • World’s first hack-proof router launched
    Turris Omnia router, tagged the world’s first hack-proof router, was launched yesterday at the CES Unveiled Show in Prague, Czech Republic. As an essential part of any home internet network, routers are rather poorly secured and protected against cyber attack. More often than not, the only security feature is the default password. With easily required internet knowledge and some skills, these routers can be hacked, providing unauthorized access to a complete internet network. From there on, anything is possible.