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Tuesday, 23 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Pocketing Police

Filed under
Software

doctormo.wordpress: An odd bit of news from the xorg foundation. During some discussion on their mailing list about missing funds it became apparent that PayPal had simply taken $5k of their money.

iPlayer On, iPlayer Off

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: The BBC's iPlayer has long been a thorn in the side of the Open Source community. Since it entered public beta in mid-2007, the BBC has consistently flip-flopped between completely ignoring FOSS users, serving them third-rate pacifier versions.

The Linux Desktop Expansion

Filed under
Linux

pcplus.techradar.com: There are three reasons why Linux isn’t succeeding on the desktop, and none of them are to do with missing functionality, using the command line or the politics of free software.

Analysis: Ubuntu 10.04 Keeping Pace, Or More, With Windows 7

Filed under
Ubuntu

crn.com: The Ubuntu community released Alpha 3 of the next-generation Lucid Lynx version of its desktop OS, and it's becoming increasingly clear that Microsoft will have difficulty putting any daylight between Windows 7 and the free operating system.

Beautify your Ubuntu desktop using the software center

Filed under
Ubuntu

mybroadband.co.za/blogs: There is nothing wrong with wanting to spruce up your computing environment. Sure there are those who live and breathe more than comfortably in a console environment but if you function in a GUI then appearances can matter.

Say, this is almost as easy as Linux!

Filed under
Microsoft
Humor

blogs.computerworld.com: But next morning it's fish who gets a panicked call from the user, who tells fish that nothing is working and can he please come right over to take a look? Fish knows he's not up on the latest Windows issues, so he heads to the user's desk with a bit of trepidation.

Mint Enlightenment

Filed under
Linux

linuxcritic.wordpress: A couple of weeks back I was talking with my Dad about what to do with his nearly-antiquated laptop (meaning from 2002.) Having had recent experience with lightweight linux distros and window managers, I decided to shop around a bit and see what else was out there.

Early peak into Gnome 3’s potential

Filed under
Software

gnome.org/seth: I am stoked to be designing a Gnome that kicks ass for hackers too. McCann is right: the ‘choice‘ between design for office monkeys and hacking monkeys is a false dichotomy.

Linux users, the coolest cats in town

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: My experience of individuals in the Open Source Software community, has been and continues to be, a privilege. They are amongst the most able and independent thinkers I have met.

Fedora 13 Alpha Pushed Back By A Week

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: The first alpha release of Fedora 13 (codenamed Goddard) was going to be due out next week, but that release is now pushed back by a week.

Ubuntu Music & Backgrounds

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • 20 Breathtaking Ubuntu Studio Wallpaper Collection
  • Ubuntu One Music Store FAQ

Lubuntu 10.04 Alpha 3 Released (w/ Screenshots)

Filed under
Linux

The most important changes in Lubuntu Alpha 3 are 4 new default applications: Chromium for the browser, gnome-mplayer as the default media player, Wicd has been replaced with the Network Manager and Pcmanfm2 as the default file manager.

But there are a lot of visual changes too. Full Story

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Where is Mozilla Ubiquity?
  • How to install Sodipodi SVG Vector Editor in Ubuntu
  • How to create a Gentoo USB installation medium
  • Boxee Beta Newer Version Released
  • Forget Linux for Dummies: now it’s Linux for Grannies
  • Iceweasel hullabaloo, part eleventy-two
  • OLPC breaks 1,000 machine barrier
  • DtO: Geekette's Syndrome
  • Kernel Newbies: Linux 2 6 33
  • Open Source Advocates Lobby Obama
  • Software industry's false choice for governments
  • Spanish government's adds software development site to OSOR's list
  • Things I've Learned about eReaders
  • Banshee 1.5.4 Released
  • Ubuntu Now Available to Fed Customers on GSA Advantage
  • The Linux Link Tech Show #342 2/24/10
  • Linux Outlaws 137 - Bing!

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Add medibuntu sources to install more useful softwares in Ubuntu
  • OpenOffice Keyboard Shortcuts
  • How to Control the CPU Usage of a Process w/ cpulimit
  • Gentoo, awesome and themes
  • How To: Change Timezone
  • Switching Between Absolute and Relative Cell References in OOo Calc
  • remap Control to Caps_Lock Key
  • How To Run Ubuntu in Windows 7 with VMware Player
  • Linux Howto: Cleaning up Your GRUB 2 Menu (part 2)
  • Turn Your Linux Box into a Home Theater with Boxee

A Return to Linux: Review of Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

timgray.blogspot: I have been a linux guy ever cince the pre 1.0 release days. I cut my teeth after the home PC on a real os with a login to a local BBS as an admin on a Unix machine, a Cromemco running Cromix. But about 5 years ago Linux became "unusable" for me at home.

Ogg Theora vs. H.264: head to head comparisons

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Streaming video websites like YouTube face growing pressure from consumers to provide support for native standards-based Web video playback. The HTML5 video element provides the necessary functionality to build robust Web media players without having to depend on proprietary plugins, but the browser vendors have not been able to build a consensus around a video codec.

The (Involuntary) Unification of Linux

Filed under
Linux

lunduke.com: One of the great things about Linux (on the desktop) is the wide variety of options available. Linux, as many would say, “is all about choice”.

Command line calculator for Linux, calculate big with bc

Filed under
Software

mynitor.com: If you’re a command line freak, you’ve probably use expr for common math calculations but did you know that the bc command allows you to do similar math calculations and is more powerful when it comes to bigger calculations?

Galcon Fusion – Review

Filed under
Gaming

lgn.linux-hardcore.com: When Galcon Fusion was released for GNU/Linux I thought it was another of those simple games that I will play for 10 minutes and lose interest very quickly – but I was so wrong…

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More in Tux Machines

Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: Nautilus, a LTS and desktop icons

If you are following closely the news of various tech websites, one of the latest hot topic in the community was about Nautilus removing desktop icons. Let’s try to clarify some points to ensure the various discussions around it have enough background information and not reacting on emotions only as it could be seen lately. You will have both downstream (mine) and upstream (Carlos) perspectives here. Read more

Programming: Perl, JavaScript, Ick, PowerFake, pylint-django, nbdkit filters

  • An Open Letter to the Perl Community

    Some consider Perl 6 to be a sister language to Perl 5. Personally, I consider Perl 6 more of a genetically engineered daughter language with the best genes from many parents. A daughter with a difficult childhood, in which she alienated many, who is now getting out of puberty into early adulthood. But I digress.

  • Long Live Perl 5!

    While not mentioned in the original Letter, a frequent theme in the comments was that Perl 6 should be renamed, as the name is inaccurate or is damaging.

    This is the topic on which I wrote more than once and those who have been following closely know that, yes, many (but by no means all) in the Perl 6 community acknowledge the name is detrimental to both Perl 6 and Perl 5 projects.

    This is why with a nod of approval from Larry we're moving to create an alias to Perl 6 name during 6.d language release, to be available for marketing in areas where "Perl 6" is not a desirable name.

  • JavaScript Trends for 2018
    Trying to bet on how many new JavaScript frameworks will be released each month, is, the best software engineer’s game in the past 5 years.
  • Ick: a continuous integration system
    TL;DR: Ick is a continuous integration or CI system. See http://ick.liw.fi/ for more information.
  • Introducing PowerFake for C++
    PowerFake is a new mini-framework/tool to make it possible to fake/mock free functions and static & non-virtual member functions in C++. It requires no change to the code under test, but it might need some structural changes, like moving some parts of the code to a different .cpp file; or making inline functions non-inline when built for testing. It is useful for writing unit tests and faking/mocking functions which should not/cannot be run during a test case. Some say that such a feature is useful for existing code, but should not be needed for a code which is written testable from the beginning. But, personally I don’t agree that it is always appropriate to inject such dependencies using virtual interfaces or templates. Currently, it is not supposed to become a mocking framework on its own. I hope that I can integrate PowerFake into at least one existing C++ mocking framework. Therefore, currently it doesn’t provide anything beyond faking existing functions.
  • Introducing pylint-django 0.8.0
    Since my previous post was about writing pylint plugins I figured I'd let you know that I've released pylint-django version 0.8.0 over the weekend. This release merges all pull requests which were pending till now so make sure to read the change log.
  • nbdkit filters
    nbdkit is our toolkit for creating Network Block Device (NBD) servers from “unusual” data sources. nbdkit was already configurable by writing simple plugins in several programming languages. Last week Eric Blake and I added a nice new feature: You can now modify existing plugins by placing “filters” in front of them.

Moving to Linux from dated Windows machines

Every day, while working in the marketing department at ONLYOFFICE, I see Linux users discussing our office productivity software on the internet. Our products are popular among Linux users, which made me curious about using Linux as an everyday work tool. My old Windows XP-powered computer was an obstacle to performance, so I started reading about Linux systems (particularly Ubuntu) and decided to try it out as an experiment. Two of my colleagues joined me. Read more

Security: TPM, Yubikey, Holes, Bricking and Uber

  • Trusted Computing
    The Trusted Platform Module on your computer's motherboard could lead to better security for your Linux system. The security of any operating system (OS) layer depends on the security of every layer below it. If the CPU can't be trusted to execute code correctly, there's no way to run secure software on that CPU. If the bootloader has been tampered with, you cannot trust the kernel that the bootloader boots. Secure Boot allows the firmware to validate a bootloader before executing it, but if the firmware itself has been backdoored, you have no way to verify that Secure Boot functioned correctly.
  • Locking the screen when removing a Yubikey

    I have my Yubikey on my key ring, so whenever I leave my computer, I have to remove the Yubikey. So why not lock the screen automatically?

  • Corporate cultural issues hold back secure software development

    The study of over 1,200 IT leaders, conducted by analysts Freeform Dynamics for software company CA Technologies, finds 58 percent of respondents cite existing culture and lack of skills as hurdles to being able to embed security within processes.

  • Stop installing our buggy Spectre CPU firmware fixes, Intel says
  • Uber shrugs off flaw that lets hackers bypass two-factor authentication

    Security researcher Karan Saini found the bug in Uber's two-factor authentication process, which has yet to be rolled out widely to Uber users. The flaw relates to the way an account is authenticated when users log in, meaning hackers [sic] with someone's username and password can drift pass the 2FA with ease.