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Saturday, 17 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Open Hardware Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2015 - 1:21pm
Story Security and Linux/FOSS/Proprietary Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2015 - 1:20pm
Story Samsung says data-eating TRIM bug is a Linux kernel problem Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2015 - 1:09pm
Story elementary OS Freya Gets Greeter and More Desktop Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 22/07/2015 - 1:06pm
Story Researcher lashes out at Hacking Team over open-source code discovery Rianne Schestowitz 22/07/2015 - 12:58pm
Story What do you think of Mageia 5 KDE? Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2015 - 12:44pm
Story Robolinux 8.1 Cinnamon Runs Windows 10 Inside the OS Rianne Schestowitz 22/07/2015 - 11:42am
Story KDAB contributions to Qt 5.5 Rianne Schestowitz 22/07/2015 - 11:33am
Story DNF 1.0.2 released Rianne Schestowitz 22/07/2015 - 11:15am
Story Shashlik - a Tasty New Android Simulator Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2015 - 9:47am

Peppermint: Ask and they deliver

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linuxcritic.wordpress: I wanted to post a quick update to that review, because things move fast in the new Linux distro world, and the Peppermint OS team is already moving on some of the relatively minor things I brought up.

Slax: Clean, cute and quick to customize

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kmandla.wordpress: I am a tinkerer. It is my nature. This is no doubt what accounts for my interest in Linux and computers. For tinkerers, one of the coolest and slickest distros out there is probably Slax.

5 Things You Didn’t Know VLC Could Do

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Software There’s a good chance that if you’re reading this, you’re familiar with VLC. VLC can do a lot more than basic video playback, including things like video encoding, DVD ripping, volume normalization and more.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.34 (Part 3) - Graphics

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Linux The AMD and Intel graphics drivers now support a wider range of chips and make better use of power saving features on the older chips. A major revamp of the recently introduced KMS driver for NVIDIA graphics hardware means that the Nouveau driver for will in future make use of kernel-based mode setting.

The kernel column #86

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Linux Last month saw the release of the final 2.6.33 Linux kernel, following several months of development. In his release announcement, Linus Torvalds specifically drew attention to newly added support for Nvidia graphics acceleration through the ‘upstreaming’ of the Nouveau 3D graphics driver, as well as the final upstreaming of the DRBD ‘Distributed Replicated Block Device’ driver that has existed for years in a separate project.

Linux Media Players Suck – Part 1: Rhythmbox

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Software The state of media players on Linux is a sad one indeed. If you’re a platform enthusiast, you may want to cover your ears and scream “la-la-la-la” while reading this article, because it will likely offend your sensibilities. This article will concentrate on lambasting Rhythmbox.

The Scribes experience: It’s all about productivity

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Software When a text editor’s catch phrase is “Scribes: It’s about the experience, not features.” you have to wonder what you are in for.

Kubuntu 10.04: Another Average KDE Distro

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  • Kubuntu 10.04: Another Average KDE Distro
  • Ubuntu: Unexpected upgrade difficulties
  • Compiz Keyboard Shortcuts in Ubuntu 10.04
  • Koala to Lynx Almost Flawless
  • Philippines 2010 Elections and Ubuntu

How To Build A Standalone File Server With Nexenta 3.0 Beta2

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Nexenta is a project developing a debian user-land for the OpenSolaris kernel. This provides all of the advantages of apt as a package respoitory (based on the Ubuntu LTS apt repository, currently using 8.04) as well as the advantages of the ZFS filesystem. In the resulting setup every user can have his/her own home directory accessible via the SMB protocol or NFS with read-/write access.

today's leftovers:

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  • PCLinuxOS 2010 Enlightenment Screenshots
  • Is the Android truly open source?
  • Harnessing UML in Ubuntu
  • What Do Open Source Surveys reveal?
  • 100$ Android Tablet from China: Eken M001
  • Best Practices for Contributors: Getting Started with Linux Distro Development
  • WeakNet IV Linux, a Great Distro for Security Experts
  • Package BLOCK for Perl 5.14
  • Red Hat and Drupal Announce New Support/Training Offerings
  • KDE Priorities
  • Linux Foundation Announces LinuxCon Keynotes, Mini-Summits
  • The GNU/Linux Code of Life
  • Beef up Firefox Privacy Features
  • Pomodoro and KDE
  • Krusader Team Celebrates 10th Birthday and Seeks New Contributors

some howtos:

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  • Enable larger persistent data for Linux Live on SolidState or USB devices
  • Bg, Fg, &, Ctrl-Z – 5 Examples to Manage Unix Background Jobs
  • 16 GB encrypted candy file
  • Installing CRUX from a CD-ROM
  • Symbian development using Linux on real life
  • How to Install XAMPP on Ubuntu Linux
  • Diagnose PC Hardware Problems with an Ubuntu Live CD
  • switching from gnu screen to tmux
  • Improving battery life time in Linux
  • Browse Folders In openSUSE With Full Root Access
  • Restore Grub 2 As The Main Bootloader
  • fix function keys (FN) issue after upgrading to ubuntu 10.04
  • Hudzilla Coding Academy: Project Ten
  • How to enable a second monitor NVIDIA
  • Compiling and installing gcocoadialog in Ubuntu

Interview with Cory Fields of XBMC

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Interviews I recently had the honor of spending time with Cory Fields, the Public / Business Relations Manger for XBMC.

Chrome VS Midori

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Software Both in response to my recent review of Midori and some argument... ehm, discussion, in yesterdays Ubuntuesday OMG! Podcast, I have taken on the task of running Midori and Google Chrome through a few tests to see which one performs better and faster.

Tilting at Windows. Why rejecting Microsoft’s OSS contributions is counter-productive

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blogs.the451group: Yesterday I had a look at the response of the Joomla! community to the news that Microsoft had signed the Joomla! Contributor Agreement and was contributing code to the content management project.

Upgrading your distro should come with a warning

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thelinuxcurmudgeon.blogspot: The upgraders, who prefer to leave their computer as is, and hit the "upgrade" button, hoping to come back to their computers in a couple hours and revel in their shiny new OS. But is the upgrade method really worth it?

No GNOME-Shell in Maverick

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  • Shuttleworth: No GNOME-Shell in Maverick
  • Ubuntu 10.04 – packed with goodies.
  • Canonical explains Ubuntu unfree video choice
  • Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx – Gasp What’s Wrong With ALSA ?

Osmos for Linux...prepare to be assimilated

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linuxlock.blogspot: When Dave Burke from Hemisphere games emailed me to let me know that his game "Osmos" had been ported to Linux, it got my attention. As requested, he sent me a link to download it and give it a try. And as most always with Indie guys, it comes with no form of DRM.

Finally a graphics card for Linux that works flawlessly with compiz and is lightning fast

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Hardware After years of struggling and looking around, I have finally found a graphics card that works flawlessly when running compiz under Linux and that processes all the effects at lightning speed. I've never seen something like this for that reasonable price!

My Wallpaper changer search

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Software With the Advent of Ubuntu 10.1 I began tweaking the Os to my liking, changing the desktop, adding programs, and that sort of stuff. I was doing good until I find that wallpaper-tray is no longer supported by Ubuntu.

PCLinuxOS 2010 - Familiar taste of radical simplicity

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PCLOS I find PCLinuxOS to be the big small distro. While it has a modest development team, the final product has always felt quite solid and polished, beyond the normal expectations of limited resources.

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More in Tux Machines

lkml: remove eight obsolete architectures

In the end, it seems that while the eight architectures are extremely different, they all suffered the same fate: There was one company in charge of an SoC line, a CPU microarchitecture and a software ecosystem, which was more costly than licensing newer off-the-shelf CPU cores from a third party (typically ARM, MIPS, or RISC-V). It seems that all the SoC product lines are still around, but have not used the custom CPU architectures for several years at this point. Read more

If you hitch a ride with a scorpion… (Coverity)

I haven’t seen a blog post or notice about this, but according to the Twitters, Coverity has stopped supporting online scanning for open source projects. Is anybody shocked by this? Anybody? [...] Not sure what the story is with Coverity, but it probably has something to do with 1) they haven’t been able to monetize the service the way they hoped, or 2) they’ve been able to monetize the service and don’t fancy spending the money anymore or 3) they’ve pivoted entirely and just aren’t doing the scanning thing. Not sure which, don’t really care — the end result is the same. Open source projects that have come to depend on this now have to scramble to replace the service. [...] I’m not going to go all RMS, but the only way to prevent this is to have open tools and services. And pay for them. Read more

Easily Fund Open Source Projects With These Platforms

Financial support is one of the many ways to help Linux and Open Source community. This is why you see “Donate” option on the websites of most open source projects. While the big corporations have the necessary funding and resources, most open source projects are developed by individuals in their spare time. However, it does require one’s efforts, time and probably includes some overhead costs too. Monetary supports surely help drive the project development. If you would like to support open source projects financially, let me show you some platforms dedicated to open source and/or Linux. Read more

KDE: Kdenlive, Kubuntu, Elisa, KDE Connect

  • Kdenlive Café #27 and #28 – You can’t miss it
    Timeline refactoring, new Pro features, packages for fast and easy install, Windows version and a bunch of other activities are happening in the Kdenlive world NOW!
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 9
    This is the 9th article, the final part of the series. This ninth article gives you more documentations to help yourself in using Kubuntu 17.10. The resources are online links to certain manuals and ebooks specialized for Kubuntu basics, command lines usage, software installation instructions, how to operate LibreOffice and KDE Plasma.
  • KDE's Elisa Music Player Preparing For Its v0.1 Released
    We have been tracking the development of Elisa, one of several KDE music players, since development started about one year ago. Following the recent alpha releases, the KDE Elisa 0.1 stable release is on the way. Elisa developers are preparing the Elisa v0.1 release and they plan to have it out around the middle of April.
  • KDE Connect Keeps Getting Better For Interacting With Your Desktop From Android
    KDE Connect is the exciting project that allows you to leverage your KDE desktop from Android tablets/smartphones for features like sending/receiving SMS messages from your desktop, toggling music, sharing files, and much more. KDE Connect does continue getting even better.
  • First blog & KDE Connect media control improvements
    I've started working on KDE Connect last November. My first big features were released yesterday in KDE Connect 1.8 for Android, so cause for celebration and a blog post! My first big feature is media notifications. KDE Connect has, since it's inception, allowed you to remotely control your music and video's. Now you can also do this with a notification, like all Android music apps do! So next time a bad song comes up, you don't need to switch to the KDE Connect app. Just click next on the notification without closing you current app. And just in case you don't like notifications popping up, there's an option to disable it.