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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KaOS 2014.12 review - Chaos and anarchy Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 9:53am
Story Mint, Ubuntu, and Desktop Environments Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 9:47am
Story Rolling release vs. fixed release Linux Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 9:25am
Story Kodi (XBMC) 14.1 'Helix' Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Mohd Sohail 03/02/2015 - 6:54am
Story How To Install VirtualBox Through PPA In Ubuntu 14.10/14.10 Or Other Distributions Mohd Sohail 03/02/2015 - 5:08am
Story Linux Australia member numbers down by 30% Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 1:47am
Story What’s New in systemd, 2015 Edition Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 12:22am
Story White House open-sources budget data on GitHub Rianne Schestowitz 02/02/2015 - 11:25pm
Story Linux Mint 17.1 Is As Good As It Gets Rianne Schestowitz 02/02/2015 - 11:16pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 02/02/2015 - 10:08pm

Can open source monopolize a market?

Filed under
OSS

cnet.com: Open source is used to playing underdog to incumbent proprietary vendors. What will happen when open source dominates, rather than commoditizes, markets?

Kernel Log - Main development phase of Linux 2.6.32 completed

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: With the first release candidate of Linux 2.6.32, last night, Linus Torvalds completed the main development phase of the next version of Linux on the main development branch.

Try Out an Unofficial, But Working, "Chrome OS"

Filed under
OS

lifehacker.com: The official, actually-made-by-Google Chrome OS won't hit netbooks until late 2010, but you can try out a custom-built Linux distribution that's somewhat stripped down and puts Google's browser at the center of everything.

Slax

Filed under
Linux

terminally-incoherent.com: I decided to do something new. I used countless live CD’s in the past, but it actually never occurred to me to try something more persistent. So I dug out my old 2GB USB stick and installed Slax.

My ideal operating system

Filed under
OS

blogs.techrepublic.com: Over the weekend I was running my usual route and doing my usual thinking…about Linux. A strange thought crossed my mind as my music-listening-device (not an iPod thank you very much) jumped from one genre of music to another: What would my ideal operating system consist of?

50 Open Source Apps for Small Biz/Home Office

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: When it comes to businesses using open source software, medium and large enterprises seem to get most of the press. However, small office/home office (SOHO) setups with 10 employees or less may see even greater benefit from switching to open source applications.

Gnome Shell… Meh

Filed under
Software

v00d00.net: Now with any major new release of GNOME you are going to get alot of “omg totally awesome new stuff in gnome!” posts. The real question is do you want it to do something new?

Making Linux Binaries Simple: Automate 'Em

Filed under
Linux
Software

informationweek.com/blog: If Linux doesn't change its attitude about prepackaged binary (read: closed source) software anytime soon, here's a suggestion: a generic software deployment system for Linux binaries.

Sharing Linux

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: Linux users aren't known for being party-animals either, Linux users do enjoy sharing information at a social gathering, and they don't need Microsoft to tell them tell how to throw a party.

Mozilla coders join Palm, apparently jabbing Apple

Filed under
Moz/FF

cnet.com: Two prominent Web-based programming advocates have left Mozilla for Palm, arguing that the time has come to use browsers to bypass Apple's controlling role in mobile applications.

Apache Holds Steady in a Changing Web Server Landscape

Filed under
Software

computerworlduk.com: Once upon a time, the monthly Netcraft Web server survey was nice and boring. Regular as clockwork, it showed the complete dominance of Apache in this sector.

Are Schools Giving Students The Wrong Idea About Technology?

Filed under
OSS

itnewstoday.com: Students being taught proprietary systems exclusively will come out of school knowing only those particular systems. Where’s the versatility there? Who exactly would that benefit?

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 322

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at HP Mini 110 Mi edition
  • News: Slackware adds KDE 3.5 to repository, Debian presents two new package management systems, Ubuntu and Mandriva announce Moblin-based systems for netbooks, Fedora community launches Fedora Mini
  • Released last week: Moblin 2.0, Absolute Linux 13.0.2
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 9.10 Beta, Ubuntu 10.04 release schedule
  • New distributions: KDuXP
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

FreeBSD 8.0 vs. Ubuntu 9.10 Benchmarks

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: With these two popular free software operating systems both having major updates coming out at around the same time, we decided it warranted some early benchmarking.

First KDialogue Is Now Open

Filed under
KDE
Web

dot.kde.org: Today, the KDE Community Forums, in collaboration with "People Behind KDE", have launched a new initiative to give the community an opportunity to get to know each other a bit closer: KDialogue.

The size of the Gentoo tree

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.flameeyes.eu: You might have noticed that I started working on cleaning up the tree (before I had a few problems with my system, but that’s for another day). Some people wondered whether that’s really going to make much difference, so I wanted to take a look.

Buying Software in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

doctormo.wordpress: The new Ubuntu App Center is an interesting addition/replacement to the old Add/Remove Applications program and the complicated synaptic package manager. It promises to bring simplicity to installing new apps to Ubuntu.

today's odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #161
  • Mozilla developers move to Palm
  • 10 Open-Source Developments You Need To Know About
  • Learning to love vim
  • Linux Networking and the Intel Atom D945GCLF2
  • Power to the user
  • Xtra Ordinary OS Review: Better than Ubuntu

Ubuntu gets set to mark fifth birthday

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: The new kid on the GNU/Linux block is getting long in the tooth. In about three weeks, Ubuntu will be five years old.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Add CryptKeeper for on-the-fly encrypted folders in Linux
  • Automatically Install Missing PPA GPG Keys With One Command
  • Howto: Manually assigning X authorisation for Debian superuser
  • Getting Drupal 7 (development snapshot) running on Ubuntu
  • Disabling SSH Tunneling
  • Squid Error : Name error: the domain name does not exist
  • Portable Ubuntu In Windows 7
  • Get Rid of Panel Shadow
  • Compilation of VLC on ubuntu 9.04
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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.