Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 17 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story IBM Is Not 1st American Company To Open Source Code To China Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2015 - 10:08am
Story Leftovers: BSD (and OpenBSD Turns 20) Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2015 - 9:44am
Story Is Open Source Facilitating Collaboration? Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2015 - 8:27am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2015 - 8:17am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2015 - 8:11am
Story BackBox Linux 4.4 review Rianne Schestowitz 18/10/2015 - 7:57am
Story The state of KDE: Pretty but unstable Rianne Schestowitz 17/10/2015 - 7:21pm
Story Ubuntu Touch Facing Account Authentication Issues, Could Offer Feedback Option Rianne Schestowitz 17/10/2015 - 4:57pm
Story Why hardware needs to go open source Rianne Schestowitz 17/10/2015 - 4:54pm
Story Bodhi Linux 3.1.0 AppPack Releas Roy Schestowitz 17/10/2015 - 4:43pm

Leading With Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Filed under
Linux

press.redhat.com: Over the last 10 years, Red Hat has brought the software industry forward with the innovative technology delivered through our Red Hat Enterprise Linux platform.

Relooking at Cairo Dock For Linux

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: More than a year ago, we reviewed Cairo Dock for Linux and how you can install and configure it in Ubuntu Intrepid. Fast forward to the present moment, Cairo Dock (now known as Glx-Dock) is still very much alive and has become one of the best dock application for Linux.

thoughts on the Ubuntu Application Review System

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Some personal thoughts on the Ubuntu Application Review System
  • Ubuntu, Canonical Wallow in Muddy Waters with Contributors' Agreements
  • Clearing the FUD around Ubuntu Application Review Process

Getting Amnesia is Frightening

Filed under
Gaming

linuxlock.blogspot: If you are someone who watches a horror movie, and you try your darndest to get the soon-to-be victims on screen to not die of pure stupidity by giving them handy advice like "Don't go into the attic!", "Turn on the light, fool!", "Run AWAY from the guy with the chainsaw!", then this might be the game for you.

Red Hat to post solid Q2

Filed under
Linux
  • Red Hat to post solid Q2: analyst
  • Red Hat Down 1.7% Ahead Of Tomorrow's Second Quarter Earnings Report

sidux changes to aptosid by upgrade or ISO

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: A press release dated September 11 came to the community's attention Monday, September 13 of the renaming or, as some reported, a fork of sidux to aptosid.

Debian Project News - September 21st

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's twelfth issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Topics covered in this issue include: Linux Mint Debian Edition, Grave software bugs, and This week in Debian interviews Stefano Zacchiroli.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.36 (Part 2) - File systems, networking and storage

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: 2.6.36 offers VFS optimisations, has returned to integrating Ext3 file systems with "data=ordered" by default and can store data from shared Windows or Samba disks in local cache to improve performance. Numerous new and improved drivers enhance the kernel's storage and network hardware support.

Are Your Desktop Effects Slowing You Down?

Filed under
Software

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Whenever I perform a 3D benchmark in Linux one of the first questions I get asked about the results is: Were your desktop effects turned off?

Stallman crashes European Patent session

Filed under
OSS

itnews.com.au: Software freedom activist Richard Stallman made an unexpected appearance at a European Patent Office presentation in Brisbane today to protest Australian software patents.

Living through the Wild West of FOSS History

Filed under
Linux
OSS

lxer.com: Could things be more exciting in the the world of FOSS right now? Yes it could, but let's not be too hasty..

SCAP: computer security for the rest of us

Filed under
Security

opensource.com: I'm setting up a new computer. I get through the registration screens, install my software, change my wallpaper, and everything's working fine. I'm left, though, with a lingering, uneasy feeling: I don't know if this machine is secure.

Oracle's "new" kernel for RHEL clone: The real truth

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com: Oracle made a big noise in the Linux community yesterday by announcing its own spin on the Linux kernel on top if its so-called Unbreakable Linux. Oracle presented the announcement as offering a "modern" Linux kernel. Underneath the hype, what's Oracle really offering, and what does it mean for Linux?

Direct3D 10/11 Is Now Natively Implemented On Linux

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: It's a pity Luca Barbieri or any Mesa / Gallium3D developers are not at Oktoberfest as they are deserving of more than a few Maß of Augustiner. In fact, today a new Gallium3D state tracker was pushed into Mesa and it's perhaps the most interesting state tracker for this open-source graphics driver architecture yet.

Mozilla Joins OIN

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox maker Mozilla joins Linux group with IBM, Red Hat
  • Mozilla Joins Open Invention Network as Licensee

Lifesaver for Maverick

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Lifesaver for Maverick
  • restrictive rules galore
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #211

Canonical Hosts Leading ODMs at Ubuntu Hardware Summit

Filed under
Linux

Original Equipment Manufacturers and Original Design Manufacturers
Learn latest techniques about shipping Ubuntu, hardware enablement and more

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • If VMware buys Novell, what happens to the Microsoft deal?
  • Easily Building Software for Multiple Distributions and Platforms
  • Getting the Twain to Meet
  • Podcast: B-Sides – What’s up with KDE?
  • Announcing the Ubuntu Application Review Process
  • Traders Hedging Bets in Red Hat as Put Volume Surges
  • Red Hat Earnings Preview
  • UberStudent Is an Ubuntu System Custom-Built for Students
  • 6 Open Source Projects for 802.1X Network Authentication
  • Canonical and others close kernel holes
  • Love is all you need
  • What happens if Mr. Nepomuk meets a bunch of Telepathyans?
  • Unofficial Opensuse FAQ Update on progress
  • Nicholas Negroponte on Success of One Laptop Per Child
  • Novell announces new SUSE Linux Certification Programs
  • EU publishes open source tools to preserve digital holdings
  • Mandriva Fork and Unity
  • New OOo 3.3.x Developer Snapshot
  • Webmin's virtual twin
  • Linux From Scratch DIY guide updated
  • DtO: Pirates Are Overrated Anyway
  • Planning grant paves way for open source Variations on Video project at IU Libraries

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install HandBrake on Ubuntu 10.04
  • Shell In A Box Gives Your Browser Terminal Status
  • Recover Grub2 After Windows Install
  • Diaspora on openSUSE
  • How to add languages in Linux (Gnome)
  • Syncing your BlackBerry on Ubuntu
  • Browse Music Via 'Album Art Display' in Rhythmbox
  • Get back CTRL-ALT-Backspace in Fedora and Ubuntu
  • Record Videos of Your Desktop on Any OS for Free
  • Text Encryption utility using AES - Furius Cipher
  • use Wildcards, Quotes, Back Quotes and Apostrophes in shell commands

Time for some Enlightenment.

Filed under
Software

toolbox.com/blogs: In the interests of efficiency I eventually settled on XFCE as my desktop environment to give me a balance of eye candy and resource efficiency. It did everything quite well and I had no trouble watching videos. Until...

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Landed

As of today, the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system is now powered by the latest and most advanced Linux 4.17 kernel series, which landed in the most recent snapshot released earlier. Tumbleweed snapshot 20180615 was released today, June 17, 2018, and it comes only two days after snapshot 20180613, which added the Mesa 18.1.1 graphics stack and KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment, along with many components of the latest KDE Applications 18.04.2 software suite. Today's snapshot 20180615 continued upgrading the KDE Applications software suite to version 18.04.2, but it also upgraded the kernel from Linux 4.16.12 to Linux 4.17.1. As such, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed is now officially powered by Linux kernel 4.17, so upgrading your installs as soon as possible would be a good idea. Read more

today's howtos and leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Using Open Source Software in a SecDevOps Environment
    On 21 June 2018 the Open Source Software3 Institute is hosting a discussion that should be of high interest to enterprise technologists in the DC/Northern Virginia, Maryland area. From their invite: Come hear from our panelists about how the worlds of Open Source Software and the Secure Development / Operations (SecDevOps) intersect and strengthen one another. SecDevOps seeks to embed security in the development process as deeply as DevOps has done with operations, and Open Source Software is a major factor in Security, Development, and Operations. Tickets are free, but you need to register soon because seating is limited.
  • TenFourFox FPR8b1 available
    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 8 beta 1 is now available (downloads, release notes, hashes). There is much less in this release than I wanted because of a family member in the hospital and several technical roadblocks. Of note, I've officially abandoned CSS grid again after an extensive testing period due to the fact that we would need substantial work to get a functional implementation, and a partially functional implementation is worse than none at all (in the latter case, we simply gracefully degrade into block-level divs). I also was not able to finish the HTML input date picker implementation, though I've managed to still get a fair amount completed of it, and I'll keep working on that for FPR9. The good news is, once the date picker is done, the time picker will use nearly exactly the same internal plumbing and can just be patterned off it in the same way. Unlike Firefox's implementation, as I've previously mentioned our version uses native OS X controls instead of XUL, which also makes it faster. That said, it is a ghastly hack on the Cocoa widget side and required some tricky programming on 10.4 which will be the subject of a later blog post.
  • GNU dbm 1.15
    GDBM tries to detect inconsistencies in input database files as early as possible. When an inconcistency is detected, a helpful diagnostics is returned and the database is marked as needing recovery. From this moment on, any GDBM function trying to access the database will immediately return error code (instead of eventually segfaulting as previous versions did). In order to reconstruct the database and return it to healthy state, the gdbm_recover function should be used.

Server: GNU/Linux Dominance in Supercomputers, Windows Dominance in Downtime

  • Five Supercomputers That Aren't Supercomputers
    A supercomputer, of course, isn't really a "computer." It's not one giant processor sitting atop an even larger motherboard. Instead, it's a network of thousands of computers tied together to form a single whole, dedicated to a singular set of tasks. They tend to be really fast, but according to the folks at the International Supercomputing Conference, speed is not a prerequisite for being a supercomputer. But speed does help them process tons of data quickly to help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. Summit, for example, is already booked for things such as cancer research; energy research, to model a fusion reactor and its magnetically confined plasma tohasten commercial development of fusion energy; and medical research using AI, centering around identifying patterns in the function and evolution of human proteins and cellular systems to increase understanding of Alzheimer’s, heart disease, or addiction, and to inform the drug discovery process.
  • Office 365 is suffering widespread borkage across Blighty
     

    Some users are complaining that O365 is "completely unusable" with others are reporting a noticeable slowdown, whinging that it's taking 30 minutes to send and receive emails.