Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 28 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Debian mourns the loss of Thiemo Seufer

Filed under
Obits

debian.org: The Debian Project has lost an active member of its community. Thiemo Seufer died on December 26th in a tragic car accident.

The Future Of The Netbook?

Filed under
Hardware
  • The Future Of The Netbook?

  • What’s the Allure of these Netbooks?
  • Are Netbooks the Future of PCs?
  • Cease and Desist: the netbook war of words
  • MSI Wind

Use sidux 2008-04 for a "Cool Yule"!

Filed under
Linux

usalug-org.blogspot: I have been promoting sidux for a while now, and sidux 2008-04 is one of their best yet. Decked out in Yuletide green, with a white ground cover, sidux 2008-04 is one cool desktop system for the Yuletide season. Why do I like sidux so much?

We already had the year of the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: For me, it's been the 'year' of the Linux desktop since 1995. That's when I started using Linux on a regular basis. My first distribution was Slackware. Slackware is still around, and it's still a fine Linux for people like me who came to Linux from Unix.

A Computer Genius, His Russian Bride, The KGB, Intrigue And Murder

Filed under
Reiser

cbsnews.com: A new "48 Hours Mystery" segment on the Hans Reiser case will air this Saturday, Jan. 3 on CBS. Check your local listings for the nighttime program. The segment features interviews with Reiser and his former best friend, Sean Sturgeon.

10 Linux Predictions for 2009

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • 10 Linux Predictions for 2009

  • Open source trends in 2009
  • Will 2009 Be Open or Closed?
  • Worst open-source predictions of 2008
  • Enterprise Linux 2008: The year in review

Cussing and Praising Kubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.linuxtoday: I took the plunge and decided to upgrade my two Gutsy boxes to Hardy. These are real working PCs, not experimental test boxes, so I was hoping for a straightforward dist-upgrade that preserved all of my settings and applications.

Full Circle Magazine - Issue #20 Available

Filed under
Ubuntu

That’s right, we’ve made it to the twentieth issue of Full Circle! It’s great to have been around this long and to have helped the Ubuntu community for so long. Here’s hoping that we get to Issue 40.

Kernel Mode-Setting Push For Linux 2.6.29 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: David Airlie has just called upon Linus Torvalds to pull the kernel mode-setting framework and Intel KMS driver support into the Linux 2.6.29 kernel.

Interclue and the pitfalls of going proprietary

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The Interclue extension is supposed to give you a preview of links in Firefox before you visit them, saving you mouse-clicks and, with a little luck, allowing you to move quickly between multiple links on the same page. Unfortunately, the determination to monetize the add-on and keep its source code closed results in elaborations that make the basic idea less effective.

The six-figure Linux job

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Since Linux is free, you’d think that the developers working with it are working for free too, right? Not so according to a piece on itcareerplanet.com.

Review: GoblinX 2.7

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: GoblinX is a LiveCD distribution built around Slackware Linux, and designed for ease of use. The flexibility of GoblinX is worthy of mention, as even its boot options show this ability. But is GoblinX an angel in disguise, or a troll under the bridge? Let's find out.

Review: Linux Mint 6

Filed under
Linux

thelinuxnewb.com: Linux Mint is one of those distributions you just can't help but love. Easy to use, stable, flexible, and so much more. Built from Ubuntu, it's been my mantra for a while that Linux Mint is “Ubuntu done right.”

openSuSE 11.1: KDE still kills it.

Filed under
SUSE

techiemoe.com: SuSE and I have a long and generally pleasant history. At least, that was the story with SuSE up until version 10.3. At that point, things started to go decidedly downhill, and it hasn't been until relatively recently that I'm beginning to feel comfortable again.

Fluxbox - Ultra-Fast/Simple Linux GUI

Filed under
Fluxbox

pcmech.com: One of the big perks of using a Linux distribution is having a choice of what window manager you want to use. The one I’ll be concentrating on is fluxbox, a window manager.

ThinkPad X300 and Linux - first impressions and power consumption issues

Filed under
Hardware

blog.gwright.org: Today I got down and installed Ubuntu 8.10 on this new X300, and things went rather smoothly. In terms of things that work, the list is rather good. However, I have noticed a few problems.

What's in a Number?

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworlduk.com: There's been a certain excitement in the blogosphere around the release of some figures about Firefox's market share in Europe. One thing that few seem to have picked up on is the unsatisfactory methodology behind these numbers.

Why games are the key to Linux adoption

Filed under
Linux

blog.andrewmin.com: I just ordered my first computer yesterday. It’s a real he-man’s gaming computer. But while these were all expensive (especially the video card), none of them compared to one item on the list: Windows. That’s the hope that Linux companies must look forward to.

Hands-on Linux: New versions of Ubuntu, Fedora and openSUSE

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: When you're talking Linux, three big names always pop up: Canonical's Ubuntu, Novell's openSUSE and Red Hat's Fedora. Each of these "big three" has recently released a new version of its distribution, which means it's time to check them out and decide which is No 1.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Windows 10 least secure of Windows versions: study
    Windows 10 was the least secure of of current Windows versions in 2016, with 46% more vulnerabilities than either Windows 8 or 8.1, according to an analysis of Microsoft's own security bulletins in 2016. Security firm Avecto said its research, titled "2016 Microsoft Vulnerabilities Study: Mitigating risk by removing user privileges", had also found that a vast majority of vulnerabilities found in Microsoft products could be mitigated by removing admin rights. The research found that, despite its claims to being the "most secure" of Microsoft's operating systems, Windows 10 had 395 vulnerabilities in 2016, while Windows 8 and 8.1 each had 265. The research also found that while 530 Microsoft vulnerabilities were reported — marginally up from the 524 reported in 2015 — and 189 given a critical rating, 94% could be mitigated by removing admin rights. This was up from 85% in 2015.
  • Windows 10 Creators Update can block Win32 apps if they’re not from the Store [Ed: By Microsoft Peter. People who put Vista 10 on a PC totally lose control of that PC; remember, the OS itself is malware, as per textbook definitions. With DRM and other antifeatures expect copyright enforcement on the desktop soon.]
    The latest Windows 10 Insider Preview build doesn't add much in the way of features—it's mostly just bug fixes—but one small new feature has been spotted, and it could be contentious. Vitor Mikaelson noticed that the latest build lets you restrict the installation of applications built using the Win32 API.
  • Router assimilated into the Borg, sends 3TB in 24 hours
    "Well, f**k." Harsh language was appropriate under the circumstances. My router had just been hacked. Setting up a reliable home network has always been a challenge for me. I live in a cramped three-story house, and I don't like running cables. So my router's position is determined by the fiber modem in a corner on the bottom floor. Not long after we moved in, I realized that our old Airport Extreme was not delivering much signal to the attic, where two game-obsessed occupants fought for bandwidth. I tried all sorts of things. I extended the network. I used Ethernet-over-powerline connectors to deliver network access. I made a mystic circle and danced naked under the full moon. We lost neighbors, but we didn't gain a signal.
  • Purism's Librem 13 Coreboot Port Now "100%" Complete
    According to Purism's Youness Alaoui, their Coreboot port to the Librem 13 v1 laptop is now considered complete. The Librem 13 was long talked about having Coreboot over a proprietary BIOS while the initial models still had shipped with the conventional BIOS. Finally in 2017, they have now Coreboot at what they consider to be 100% complete for this Linux-friendly laptop.
  • The Librem 13 v1 coreboot port is now complete
    Here are the news you’ve been waiting for: the coreboot port for the Librem 13 v1 is 100% done! I fixed all of the remaining issues, it is now fully working and is stable, ready for others to enjoy. I fixed the instability problem with the M.2 SATA port, finished running all the tests to ensure coreboot is working correctly, fixed the headphone jack that was not working, made the boot prettier, and started investigating the Intel Management Engine issue.
  • Linux Update Fixes 11-Year-Old Flaw
    Andrey Konovalov, a security researcher at Google, found a use-after-free hole within Linux, CSO Online reported. This particular flaw is of interest because it appears to be situational. It only showed up in kernels built with a certain configuration option — CONFIG_IP_DCCP — enabled.

Kerala saves Rs 300 cr as schools switch to open software

The Kerala government has made a saving of Rs 300 crore through introduction and adoption of Free & Open Source Software (FOSS) in the school education sector, said a state government official on Sunday. IT became a compulsory subject in Kerala schools from 2003, but it was in 2005 only that FOSS was introduced in a phased manner and started to replace proprietary software. The decision made by the curriculum committee to implement it in the higher secondary sector has also been completed now. Read more

Tired of Windows and MAC computer systems? Linux may now be ready for prime time

Are you a bit tired of the same old options of salt and pepper, meaning having to choose only between the venerable Windows and MAC computer operating systems? Looking to branch out a bit, maybe take a walk on the wild side, learn some new things and save money? If so, the Linux operating system, which has been around for a long time and is used and loved by many hard-core techies and developers, may now be ready for prime time with the masses. Read more

Braswell based Pico-ITX SBC offers multiple expansion options

Axiomtek’s PICO300 is a Pico-ITX SBC with Intel Braswell, SATA-600, extended temperature support, and both a mini-PCIe and homegrown expansion connector. Axiomtek has launched a variation on its recently announced Intel Apollo Lake based PICO312 SBC that switches to the older Intel Braswell generation and offers a slightly reduced feature set. The board layout has also changed somewhat, with LVDS, SATA, and USB ports all changing location. Read more