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Friday, 29 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Make 2013 the year you switch to Linux srlinuxx 01/01/2013 - 6:54pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 01/01/2013 - 4:59am
Story Top Linux Distribution Releases of 2012 srlinuxx 01/01/2013 - 4:52am
Story Is Steam the Big Breakthrough Gaming for Linux Need? srlinuxx 01/01/2013 - 12:50am
Story Speed up the Kernel srlinuxx 01/01/2013 - 12:48am
Story Haiku: BeOS for the 21st Century srlinuxx 01/01/2013 - 12:41am
Story Five Linux predictions for 2013 srlinuxx 31/12/2012 - 10:20pm
Story Mozilla Firefox in 2012 srlinuxx 31/12/2012 - 7:18pm
Story Aakash 3 May Feature SIM Slot, Linux Support srlinuxx 31/12/2012 - 7:16pm
Story Five Biggest Open Source Developments in 2012 srlinuxx 31/12/2012 - 7:13pm

Filing US federal taxes under Linux

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Filling out tax returns has traditionally been an area where Linux comes up short compared to the proprietary platforms, but you actually have several options for using commercial income tax products on a Linux platform. Here's a quick look.

I switched to Linux

Intel Core 2 Duo T9300

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: For a year now Intel has been flaunting its 45nm "Penryn" processor core with its SSE4 instruction set, High-K metal gate transistors, and 6MB of L2 cache. We have compared its performance against earlier Centrino-based ThinkPads as we look at how this latest Intel processor performs with Ubuntu Linux.

Ten tips for new Ubuntu users

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntuland.nireblog: Ubuntu has become the most popular Linux distribution for new Linux users. It's easy to install, easy to use, and usually "just works." But moving to a different operating system can be confusing, no matter how well-designed it is. Here's a list of tips that might save you some time.

Texmaker tames LaTeX

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Texmaker is an editor for the document markup language LaTeX. It lets you concentrate on the content of a document, while the underlying LaTeX engine takes care of the layout. Whether you are experienced with LaTeX or just starting out, Texmaker makes LaTeX easier to tame.

Compiz Fusion Community News for 25th March 2008

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: Welcome to yet another edition of the Compiz Fusion Community News, lots of cool new things for you to try out this time. This time we’ve got a few bugfixes, a sleek new curved expo mode, screenlets supporting web-based widgets and a re-write of the Wallpaper plugin.

Hacker Super Bowl pits Mac OS vs. Linux, Vista

Filed under
OS
Security

linuxworld.com (IDG): It's the most anticipated matchup in the hacker world: Linux versus Mac OS X versus Vista. Who will get hacked first? That's what organizers of the CanSecWest security conference hope to discover this week.

KDE’s Plasma Project aims to find out who their users really are

Filed under
KDE

newlinuxuser.com: As an analyst, I work with data about people and their systems. One of these aspects involves usability. And even if I don’t use KDE and KDE apps much I still feel in awe of the Plasma project’s aim. User profiles are not easy to figure out and it does take time and much analysis.

Photoshop goes online, free

Filed under
Software

tectonic.co.za: Adobe today announced an online, free, version of its popular Photoshop application. And because Photoshop Express is Flash-based the application will run across most operating systems including Linux, Mac and Windows.

A Borg's night with Linux.

blogs.ittoolbox: It was a typical Wednesday night for this particular Borg who we will call for the sake of names Locutus Smile As Locutus had to go straight to a Linux Users Group meeting from work he remotely logged in via ssh with a secure key and set the borgship to start recording from the DVR-card his comedies that would be starting while at the meeting.

Possible manipulation around OOXML process in Poland

Filed under
OSS

polishlinux.org: This is a follow-up post to my recent report on OOXML process in Poland. It looks like things are going bad this time. At least as bad as in October.

Also: ODF guerillas rally for document freedom
And: Porn Site technique used to promote OOXML

New Features in OpenOffice.org 2.4.0

Filed under
OOo

The multiplatform, multilingual office suite OpenOffice.org announces the official release of version 2.4 with 9 new chart features, 5 PDF export enhancements, text to columns in Calc, rectangular selection in Writer, bug fixes, performance improvements, improvements supporting the growing library of extensions such as 3D OpenGL transitions in Impress, and much more. Downloads are available either direct or P2P. In September, OpenOffice.org 3.0 will add PDF import, Microsoft Office 2007 file format support, and ODF 1.2.

OpenOffice.org 2.4 Released, New Site Look

Filed under
OOo

openoffice.org: The OpenOffice.org Community is pleased to announce the release of OpenOffice.org 2.4. 2.4 includes many new features, enhancements, and bug fixes to all its core components. The Website team has designed and implemented a clean new style that we believe will make it easier to find OpenOffice.org, download, and learn about it.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Get over it already. Microsoft is not the Anti-Christ

  • Microsoft Lawyer Faces a Community Grilling
  • Fascinated by Gentoo
  • Gentoo
  • Automatix is Dead
  • LinuxTag 2008 with OpenOffice.org "mini conference"
  • Asus launches Eee PC SDK
  • Mandriva One 2008 on EEE PC
  • Asustek to roll out second-generation Eee PC w/ touchscreen panels in June
  • Asus admits big global Eee supply-demand imbalance
  • Russian Postal Service Wears Red Hat
  • Humanitarian projects and open source: Working together to revitalize computer sciences
  • Initiative helps farmers in rural India using OSS
  • The Future of Open Source: Another View
  • Linux gains new architecture support
  • 2.6.25-rc7, "Most of the Changes Are Pretty Small"
  • Some casual CHHDSK fun
  • Hans Reiser Trial: March 26, 2008

some more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Threading Building Blocks and Linux Distributions, Part 1

  • Threading Building Blocks and Linux Distributions, Part 2
  • Python: Threading Callback Timer
  • Manual Mass File Patching On Linux Or Unix
  • Restore Selected Files From Secondary Backup Hard Disk
  • USB SUSE Installation from Linux
  • Blogging From the Terminal

Debian Linux powers science education device

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: An education supplies company has announced a portable science education computer that runs embedded Debian Linux. Pasco says it designed its sensor-equipped Spark Science Learning System for collaborative science experiments by students, for example measuring conductivity or tracking temperature changes.

OpenOffice.Org 2.4 to be released today

Filed under
OOo

liquidat.wordpress: OpenOffice will see a new release today: version 2.4. Among the new features are improved multi language management and 3D eyecandy for Impress. While it is only a minor release it does come along with some nice additions:

The future of open source

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: This week, the covers were lifted on North Bridge Venture Partner’s annual Future of Open Source survey. The results present a clear picture where pundits expect open source to make huge inroads as well as where proprietary software is likely to retain dominance.

Also: OSBC Panel Looks at the Future of the OS

Should Open Source Projects Accept VC Backing?

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: According to a talk by Benchmark Capital's Rob Bearden at this week's Open Source Business Conference (OSBC), the nature of open source business models are changing. He says open source companies should strive to become the "enterprise standard" in their market space in order to effectively monetize their commodities.

Create Flash Content in Linux - A Missing Link for Developers?

Filed under
Linux

ubuntulinuxhelp.com: Last month we posted “Top 100 of the Best (Useful) OpenSource Applications“, which listed some really good open source applications. One of the things missing was a good OpenSource, Flash content creation tool.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Apache Graduates Another Big Data Project to Top Level
    For the past year, we've taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent months. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support. Only days ago, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. And now, Apache Twill has graduated as well. Twill is an abstraction over Apache Hadoop YARN that reduces the complexity of developing distributed Hadoop applications, allowing developers to focus more on their application logic.
  • Spark 2.0 takes an all-in-one approach to big data
    Apache Spark, the in-memory processing system that's fast become a centerpiece of modern big data frameworks, has officially released its long-awaited version 2.0. Aside from some major usability and performance improvements, Spark 2.0's mission is to become a total solution for streaming and real-time data. This comes as a number of other projects -- including others from the Apache Foundation -- provide their own ways to boost real-time and in-memory processing.
  • Why Uber Engineering Switched from Postgres to MySQL
    The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL. In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL.
  • GNU Hyperbole 6.0.1 for Emacs 24.4 to 25 is released
    GNU Hyperbole (pronounced Ga-new Hi-per-bo-lee), or just Hyperbole, is an amazing programmable hypertextual information management system implemented as a GNU Emacs package. This is the first public release in 2016. Hyperbole has been greatly expanded and modernized for use with the latest Emacs 25 releases; it supports GNU Emacs 24.4 or above. It contains an extensive set of improvements that can greatly boost your day-to-day productivity with Emacs and your ability to manage information stored across many different machines on the internet. People who get used to Hyperbole find it helps them so much that they prefer never to use Emacs without it.
  • Belgium mulls reuse of banking mobile eID app
    The Belgium government wants to reuse ‘Belgian Mobile ID’ a smartphone app for electronic identification, developed by banks and telecom providers in the country. The eID app could be used for eGovernment services, and the federal IT service agency, Fedict, is working on the app’s integration.
  • Water resilience that flows: Open source technologies keep an eye on the water flow
    Communities around the world are familiar with the devastation brought on by floods and droughts. Scientists are concerned that, in light of global climate change, these events will only become more frequent and intense. Water variability, at its worst, can threaten the lives and well-beings of countless people. Sadly, humans cannot control the weather to protect themselves. But according to Silja Hund, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, communities can build resilience to water resource stress. Hund studies the occurrence and behavior of water. In particular, she studies rivers and streams. These have features (like water volume) that can change quickly. According to Hund, it is essential for communities to understand local water systems. Knowledge of water resources is helpful in developing effective water strategies. And one of the best ways to understand dynamic water bodies like rivers is to collect lots of data.

Development News

  • JavaScript keeps its spot atop programming language rankings
    U.K.-based technology analyst firm RedMonk just released the latest version of its biannual rankings of programming languages, and once again JavaScript tops the list, followed by Java and PHP. Those are same three languages that topped RedMonk’s list in January. In fact, the entire top 10 remains the same as it was it was six months ago. Perhaps the biggest surprise in Redmonk’s list—compiling the “performance of programming languages relative to one another on GitHub and Stack Overflow”—is that there are so few surprises, at least in the top 10.
  • Plenty of fish in the C, IEEE finds in language popularity contest
    It's no surprise that C and Java share the top two spots in the IEEE Spectrum's latest Interactive Top Programming Languages survey, but R at number five? That's a surprise. This month's raking from TIOBE put Java at number one and C at number two, while the IEEE reverses those two, and the IEEE doesn't rank assembly as a top-ten language like TIOBE does. It's worth noting however that the IEEE's sources are extremely diverse: the index comprises search results from Google, Twitter, GitHub, StackOverflow, Reddit, Hacker News, CareerBuilder, Dice, and the institute's own eXplore Digital Library. Even then, there are some oddities in the 48 programming environments assessed: several commenters to the index have already remarked that “Arduino” shouldn't be considered a language, because code for the teeny breadboard is written in C or C++.