Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 26 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Technology on a Diet: 5 Reasons to Embrace Open Source Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 9:44am
Story Performance and security in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 9:26am
Blog entry Apple privacy policy frustrates government keziahcollins 23/09/2014 - 9:16am
Story 10 Android Smartphone Alternatives to the Apple iPhone 6 Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:45am
Story The Features Coming For Fedora 21 Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:42am
Story Bullies in the Machine or Pick On Someone Your Own Size Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:37am
Story Bringing Literacy to Millions of Kids With Open Source Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:20am
Story Counter-Strike: Global Offensive NVIDIA/AMD Benchmarks On Linux Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:19am
Story Snowden: New Zealand Is Spying, Too Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:10am
Story Bodhi Lives, Jessie Hints, and openSUSE Beta Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:01am

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Eva's useful guide to Ubuntu 9.04

  • Linux Migration for the Home PC User, Part 6
  • Download Ubuntu 9.04 "Jaunty Jackalope" Faster
  • Anatomy of Linux Dynamic Libraries
  • Dropbox on openSUSE 11.1
  • Keeping the beast Pulseaudio at bay
  • 10 ways of resetting a lost linux root password
  • Virtualisation made easy
  • How to Cure a Windows Virus with Linux
  • How to install BackTrack 3 or 4 to hard drive
  • Linux Partition Recovery - Tips & Tricks
  • Pain Free Backups With GRsync and Gnome Schedule
  • Slow Down Firefox Scrolling Speed
  • Getting a Domain Name on a Dynamic Address with NoIP
  • Send SMS alerts when emerge completes
  • The Bash declare Statement
  • Nautilus Compact View quick fix

ECIS Provides A History of Microsoft's AntiCompetitive Behavior

Filed under
Microsoft

groklaw.net: It is, to the best of my knowledge, the first time that the issue of Microsoft's patent threats against Linux have been presented to a regulatory body as evidence of anticompetitive conduct.

Ex-Red-Hat brains decide to ride cloud

theregister.co.uk: Cloud computing is causing IT vendors to change their pitches on the off chance that cloud could actually end up generating some money. And to that end, rPath is shifting gears with version 5.0 of its rBuilder.

First Android netbooks surface

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Guanzhou, China-based Skytone announced the Alpha 680, a 533MHz ARM11-based netbook with a 7-inch touchscreen that appears to be the first commercial netbook running Android.

Firefox 3.0.9 security release now available

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: As part of the Mozilla Corporation’s ongoing security and stability process, Firefox 3.0.9 is now available for Windows, Mac, and Linux users as a free download from getfirefox.com.

Red Hat and Fedora are Poles Apart

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: While Fedora is too bleeding edge, Red Hat (and Centos) is too conservative. They are poles apart and don't offer anything in between.

“We’re Linux” Videos: Placing Freedom Before Practicality?

Filed under
Linux

workswithu.com: The Linux Foundation recently announced the winner and runners up of the “We’re Linux” video contest that it sponsored as a response to the well-known promotional campaigns by Microsoft and Apple. The selections are professional and inspiring, but I worry that their focus on “freedom” limits their effectiveness. Here’s why.

Abiword is Awesome

Filed under
Software

omegamormegil.wordpress: Abiword has just become my new favorite word processor. It’s always been nice for being so quick and low on resources, but the 2.6 release of Abiword has added two new features which have pushed it over the top for me.

Why I Use Linux

Filed under
Linux

pcworld.com: I am not a programmer. Yet Linux is built on the philosophical principle of freely sharing source code. This is how those who create Linux frequently advocate it. But if I'm not a programmer, and source code therefore means little to me, why do I use Linux?

Open source VS proprietary support

Filed under
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: One of the biggest arguments people try to use against Open source programs is the supposed lack of support. In general I have found that support for open source programs is equal to and ofttimes better than that provided by proprietary companies.

The offensive Microsoft anti-Linux netbook offensive

Filed under
Microsoft

itwire.com: Ever since the unexpected advent of netbooks Microsoft has been working to push Linux out. Microsoft have reminded us they’re a proprietary company with the offensive Windows 7 Starter Edition being limited to three apps only. Are they trying to insult us or what?

Also: Will Microsoft blow its netbook lead with Windows 7 crippleware?

CentOS 5.3 Has Keen Focus on Virtualization

Filed under
Linux

eweek.com: CentOS is based on Red Hat's Enterprise Linux source packages and shares in Red Hat Enterprise Linux's recent virtualization, app dev, security and storage improvements. Many of the enhancements in CentOS 5.3 come in the area of virtualization, targeted largely at scalability on large host machines.

4 Minimal Linux Desktop Distributions

Filed under
Linux

productivelinux.com: I’ve been researching concepts of minimalism as it applies to computing and personal productivity, and I’m convinced that in many cases, a minimal setup can really help you get more done.

How To Upgrade From Ext3 To Ext4 Without Formatting

Filed under
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: I did mention that the new filesystem - ext4 is stable, fast and backward compatible with ext2 and ext3. Today, we will look at how you can upgrade your existing ext3 filesystem to ext4 without reformating your hard disk.

Aaron Seigo Talks About KDE's Past and Future

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

itmanagement.earthweb: Aaron Seigo is one of the most public faces of the KDE desktop. Not only is he a long-time developer, but, for the past three years, he has been president of KDE e.V.. Now nearing the end of his time as president, he talked about KDE's recent past and near future, and his role in both.

Red Hat maps open source activity. France is #1

Filed under
OSS

blog.internetnews.com: Red Hat today published a new study together with Georgia Tech mapping open source activity across 75 countries. Officially called the Open Source Index (OSI), the final score is made of a number of factors including policies, practices in the Government, Industry, and Community.

Does Debian still matter?

Filed under
Linux

pcauthority.com.au/Blog: Debian was one of the first Linux distributions, and it pioneered much of what we take for granted in Linux systems today. But has Debian had its day?

Is Debian dying?

Filed under
Linux

debaira.blogspot: Debian is certainly the first, large-scale (>1400 developers), global, volunteer created and driven, engineering project whose ambitious concern is nothing less than meeting the needs of all of its users with incisive design effectiveness for an easy to install, general purpose operating system.

Neuros Link: Tuning In HDTV, Using Ubuntu

workswithu.com: I recently came across an Ubuntu-based device that is designed for viewing streaming and local video content on an HDTV. The device in question is the Neuros Link.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Debian and Derivatives

  • Glad to be a Mentor of Google Summer Code again!
    While, why I proposed this idea? Plinth is developed by Freedombox which is a Debian based project. The Freedombox is aiming for building a 100% free software self-hosting web server to deploy social applications on small machines. It provides online communication tools respecting user privacy and data ownership, replacing services provided by third-parties that under surveillance. Plinth is the front-end of Freedombox, written in Python.
  • The #newinstretch game: new forensic packages in Debian/stretch
    Debian/stretch AKA Debian 9.0 will include a bunch of packages for people interested in digital forensics. The packages maintained within the Debian Forensics team which are new in the Debian/stretch release as compared to Debian/jessie (and ignoring jessie-backports):
  • Getting ready for Stretch
    I run about 17 servers. Of those about six are very personal and the rest are a small cluster which are used for a single website. (Partly because the code is old and in some ways a bit badly designed, partly because "clustering!", "high availability!", "learning!", "fun!" - seriously I had a lot of fun putting together a fault-tolerant deployment with haproxy, ucarp, etc, etc. If I were paying for it the site would be both retired and static!)
  • Devuan Jessie 1.0.0 stable release (LTS)
    Once again the Veteran Unix Admins salute you! Many of you might remember November 2014 when we announced that we were going to fork Debian. Well, we have done exactly that. It has been a long process, but now over two years later, we proudly present Devuan Jessie 1.0.0 Stable.
  • Parsix GNU/Linux Is Closing Its Doors, All Users Will Be Migrated to Debian 9
    You know we hate to give you guys bad news, but it looks like the Parsix GNU/Linux project is closing its doors in about six months after the release of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system.

OSS Leftovers

Ubuntu-Based Alternatives and Snapcraft 2.30

  • ​How to install Linux Mint on your Windows PC
    I think Linux Mint isn't just a great desktop, it's a great replacement for Windows. With Windows security problems such as WannaCry, people are starting to explore alternatives to Windows. I got a number of requests about switching out from Windows to the latest and best Linux. For me and many other experienced Linux users that's Linux Mint 18.1. You don't need to be a Linux expert to install Mint on a Windows PC. Here's how to do it.
  • Distro watch for Ubuntu lovers: What's ahead in Linux land
    With the death of Unity, Canonical will focus more attention on Ubuntu servers, Ubuntu in the cloud and Ubuntu in the so-called Internet of Things. Even if you give Canonical the benefit of the doubt - that it will continue working on desktop Ubuntu - at the very least, desktop Ubuntu's future looks uncertain. Post Unity, how will the transition to GNOME work? Will existing Unity users be "upgraded" to GNOME with 17.10? Canonical is reportedly plotting out solutions to much of this uncertainty right now, but for users, the uncertainty rules the day.
  • Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.30 Snappy Packaging Tool for Ubuntu Linux OSes
    Canonical's Sergio Schvezov was proud to announce the release and immediate availability of Snapcraft 2.30, a major milestone of the open-source Snappy packaging tool used to package apps in the Snap universal binary format.

An introduction to Linux's EXT4 filesystem

Although written for Linux, the EXT filesystem has its roots in the Minix operating system and the Minix filesystem, which predate Linux by about five years, being first released in 1987. Understanding the EXT4 filesystem is much easier if we look at the history and technical evolution of the EXT filesystem family from its Minix roots. Read more