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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2015 - 10:31pm
Story Pro tip: Find tons of open-source Android software with F-Droid Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2015 - 10:28pm
Story Librem 15 Linux Laptop Set To Close At Around $400k USD Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2015 - 9:33pm
Story US Army and FOSS Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2015 - 9:27pm
Story Mark Morton: Why we chose an open source website Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2015 - 9:24pm
Story Pondering the Fate of Open Source & Software Licenses Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2015 - 9:21pm
Story Open Lunchbox: Yet Another Open-Source Laptop Attempt Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2015 - 7:01pm
Story Get a paycheck in open source, be a social activist Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2015 - 6:45pm
Story Linux Mint 17.1 (Rebecca) vs. Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2015 - 6:28pm
Story solydxk Ready for the transition and new ISOs Rianne Schestowitz 31/01/2015 - 5:58pm

Tux Paint – A Great Image Program for Your Children

Filed under
Software

howtogeek.com: Looking for a wonderful image program for your children (or inner child)? Tux Paint makes a terrific addition to your family’s computer whether you are using Windows, Linux, or Mac.

LinuxCon:

Filed under
Linux
  • LinuxCon: The Little Things Make All The Difference
  • How Muppets learned to stop licensing and love the comm
  • LinuxCon: Desktop Should Be Better Than Windows

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Watch Out for That Meteor, Stallman.
  • Linux is bloated, says Torvalds
  • Why open-source DNS is 'internet's dirty little secret'
  • Replicating Linux's Success
  • Open Source can help India save Rs 10,000 crore
  • Red Hat remains red hot on the Street on eve of next earnings report
  • IBM Markets Wares and Ubuntu to Africa
  • LinuxCon: Beyond the Hype: The True Cost of Linux and Open Source
  • Red Hat's Deltacloud at Tip of Epic Change
  • Dell to offer Intel App Store on Consumer Netbooks
  • New Installer screenshots for Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic)
  • LinuxCon Audio Diary 2
  • LinuxCon Audio Diary 1
  • For the truly paranoid (password generator)
  • Gnome Wallpaper Rotate Script
  • Can a laptop change the world?
  • Making Money from Open Source and the Business Model Debate
  • Plasma: Where we are going
  • Plasma 4.4: Update on where we are
  • OLPC gets microwaved, molded into stunning piece of art

some howto:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu Tip : Easy way to enable font smoothing in Wine
  • How to Install and Use Ubuntu Netbook Remix
  • How to: to system update on OpenSuse via console
  • How to Cut/Split Video using Avidemux
  • Opening files automatically on mainstream Linux desktops
  • 10 PostgreSQL Performance Optimization Tips
  • How to install PHP PDO_OCI on Ubuntu
  • How To: Install PHP 5.3 on CentOS 5.1 or RHEL 5.1

Alternative Netbook Operating Systems

Filed under
OS

gottabemobile.com: Rather than sticking with Microsoft Windows XP or the updated Windows 7, there are a variety of reasons for checking out alternative operating systems for your netbook.

The Report from Fake Portland: LinuxCon 2009

Filed under
Linux

redmonk.com/sogrady: If you’ve been to enough of them, you know that conferences have very definite lifespans. The trajectories may vary according to variables like subject matter, economic conditions or the geographic location, but they’re all pretty much the same.

Dropping Compiz for Mutter (Metacity 3) compositing?

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

blog.thesilentnumber.me: I'd like to ask the Ubuntu developer community to consider freeing up valuable CD space by removing Compiz and just using Mutter (Metacity 3) compositing in the default installation for Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, Lucid Lynx.

A Quick Look At Gnome 3’s Desktop Sidebar

Filed under
Software

d0od.blogspot: Continuing our look at Gnome 3’s Gnome-Shell, we land upon the oft unnoticed desktop sidebar!

Myths about Open Source

Filed under
OSS

livemint.com: I recently met an old school friend over a cup of coffee and we spoke about life, movies and music. Then the topic moved on to technology. The conversation moved to open source and how he really didn’t get the concept of it and he was just against it.

The Linux Foundation's "Community" Doesn't Look Very Community

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com/blog: Here we are on Day Two of the Linux Foundation's Linuxcon, and it sure looks like the face of Linux is still a bearded one, despite the Linux Foundation's grand claims of Community. Perhaps they have a more limited definition of "community."

Ubuntu Linux - To love and to hate

Filed under
Ubuntu

sinaisix.blogspot.com: Ubuntu Linux is, arguably, the most popular Linux distro around today, with millions of people who deeply love it. There are some people however, who, for some reasons, do not just want to hear the mention of Ubuntu.

Does the Linux desktop need to be popular?

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: Does Linux desktop even need to be popular? There are, shall we say, differing options among the open source cognoscenti gathered in Portland, Oregon this week for the annual LinuxCon.

Chrome Netbook Operating System By Christmas?

Filed under
OS

itworld.com: One of the tidbits author Jerri Ledford told me during my interview to get information for the Daily Tip entry Chrome Tips and Tricks for Better Browsing was that she felt Google's Chrome operating system would be on netbooks by Christmas.

CentOS Pulse #0905 - The CentOS Newsletter

Filed under
News

With a little delay, issue #0905 of the CentOS Pulse newsletter has been released. It covers topics like the CentOS 4.8 release, the Spanish CentOS community, wireless networking and contains an interesting interview with Tru Huynh.

Ubuntu 10.04: A Closer Look

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth announced objectives for Ubuntu 10.04, a.k.a “Lucid Lynx,” to attendees of the Atlanta Linux Fest (more conference coverage) last week. Here’s a look.

Replacing KDE applications

Filed under
Software

linuxcritic.wordpress: I’ve been on an app-hunt to replace some of the applications to which I’ve grown used to in KDE, mostly so that I can break my ties with that desktop and move forward completely without it.

Mr. Torvalds, Shrink That Kernel

Filed under
Linux
  • Mr. Torvalds, Shrink That Kernel
  • Does it matter that "Linux is bloated"?
  • Linux And The 'B' Word: Bloat

5 phrases that diminish the credibility of Linux, Mac, and Windows users

Filed under
OS

blogs.techrepublic.com: Much like “The Boy Who Cried Wolf,” if you see the same claim made in every argument, time and time again, that claim starts to lose credibility. I don’t think there’s anywhere in modern life where this is more visible than in the Linux/Mac/Windows flame wars.

Fedora Mini: A New Netbook Competitor?

Filed under
Linux

workswithu.com: For a long time, Ubuntu was the only big-name Linux distribution with a specially tailored netbook version. That changed recently with the announcement of Fedora Mini.

The holy tech flame wars

royal.pingdom.com: Since the dawn of technology people have been arguing about which technology is better. As with all such debates there are usually no simple answers and it often comes down to personal taste. Let’s have a look.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.