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Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

PCLinuxOS Magazine May 2008 Released

Filed under
PCLOS

PCLinuxOS Magazine, May 2008 (Issue 21) is available to download. Some highlights include: Manage your Ipod with Amarok, PCLinuxOS Based Distros, and Quick Fix for Damaged Xorg.

Highly Addictive Puzzle/Arcade Games for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

junauza.com: When I have a few spare time or just want to loosen up a bit, I always indulge myself into playing some computer games. I go for the old-fashioned and graphics card-friendly puzzle and arcade games. Call me boring, but these stuff are really addictive and highly entertaining. So, what are these games?

OOXML expert: ODF standard is broken

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.co.uk: The International Organization for Standardization's OpenDocument Format standard is broken and needs to be mended, according to an expert who claims to have carried out tests on the format.

Will open source save Sun?

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OSS
  • Will open source save Sun?

  • Sun Financials: Not Good News for Open Source
  • Will market reject Sun’s open source vision?
  • Sun’s open source strategy overshadowed by legacy businesses
  • Can Sun Rise Again?

Desktop evaluation - Linux, Mac OS and Windows

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OS

blogs.zdnet.com: I’ve been asked by a KG client to run through a specific set of functions on a specific set of desktop environments and report back to them on my experiences. The client chose a short list of operating environnents and hardware platforms that included Apple Mac OS X, Novell SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop (SLED), and Windows XP.

There's Linux Inside

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Linux

linuxjournal.com: Have you ever uncovered Linux hidden in a place you didn't expect or have you implemented it covertly? Here are some interesting stories from readers.

An open palette: Tux Paint's Bill Kendrick

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Interviews

computerworld.com.au: Bill Kendrick is a software machine. He is the lead designer and developer of New Breed Software. But perhaps Kendrick's most significant software achievement is Tux Paint, a highly acclaimed, free and open source illustration program. Computerworld spoke with Bill Kendrick.

Switching to Linux which distro to use, Mandriva?

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MDV

opencomputer.net: First Mandriva’s live CD takes me through a few questions such as my language, location, keyboard layout, and even had me accept their terms and conditions. Then, the next thing I saw was beautiful!

Why the Linux world should embrace the BSD's

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BSD

raiden.net: There are some in this world who believe that Linux is the king of all operating systems. In some ways I agree with them. The BSD's however use the more orderly 'Cathedral' model where FreeBSD is shaped by the high priests (the core developers) with input from the novices.

ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Mrs Red Devil Installs Ubuntu 8.04

  • Make your Widescreen work in Ubuntu
  • Troubles with Ubuntu 8.04
  • Ubuntu on the OLPC XO-1
  • Ubuntu Hardy Heron: Beyond the Hype and into the Dilemma

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • YouTube tools for the Linux desktop

  • Batch process photos with Phatch
  • My first months at Acquia
  • $100 Laptop Program's New President
  • AMD reveals open source client management tool
  • Simple use of find to search for files in command line
  • The Evil Empire
  • Chumby: Cutest Linux Computer Ever
  • Linux-guru's conviction fuels ReiserFS debate
  • The Fall of Reiser
  • Configuring Linux Terminal to Work as a Transparent Wallpaper — Part 2

KDE Commit-Digest for 20th April 2008

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KDE

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: The start of the Google Summer of Code with 47 KDE projects. Initial version of a kxsldbg plugin for Quanta. Kross-based scripting in KDevelop. Tabs return to the kdevplatform (KDevelop, etc) interface framework. A database plugin for Kommander, with Kommander widgets becoming accessible within Designer. Support for file attachment and sound annotations in Okular.

gNewSense 2.0 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Less than a week after the release of Ubuntu 8.04 LTS "Hardy Heron", the Free Software Foundation has gone ahead and released version 2.0 (named DeltaH) of gNewSense. For those not familiar with gNewSense, this is one of the few distributions certified by the Free Software Foundation as being a truly free Linux distribution.

Mini Review: Open Source in Harvard Business Review

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OSS

linuxjournal.com: This month's Harvard Business Review features a case study of a company debating whether to open source its software. Here's a mini review of the article.

Multiple Linux flaws show that Linux also has kernel issues

Filed under
Linux
Security

blogs.zdnet.com: Not to defend Microsoft, as kernel exploits that provide privileged access are terrible flaws, but we had an interesting discussion in the talkbacks where several people acted as if Microsoft was the only place that could’ve made such mistakes. Well, this is a common flaw across operating systems that is difficult to catch due to the complexities of kernel code.

Gratis Ubuntu Live 2008 Conference Pass

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Ubuntu

linuxquestions.org: Are you interested in attending the second Ubuntu Live conference? It’s my pleasure to inform you that LQ is able to give away one $895 full conference pass absolutely free of charge.

Linux vs. Windows Metrics -- Nothing Is Quite What It Seems To Be

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OS

Caitlyn Martin: 10 days ago the Linux Loop blog had a post titled “Linux Eee PC Far Faster Than Windows Version”. The author compared the times of three tasks: boot up, loading Firefox, and shutting down. That’s hardly a comprehensive set of tests. I’m going to try and sift through the morass and say what I think the numbers really mean and what they don’t mean.

Mandriva Linux - Great For Newbies

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MDV

itnerd.wordpress: Let’s say that you want to dump Windows, but you don’t want to go to Mac? That leaves Linux as your only option. But you’re scared about moving to Linux as you’re not sure that it’s right for you. No problem, there’s a Linux for you and It’s called Mandriva Linux One. I tried this out a week ago and it is nothing short of amazing!

Also: Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring Xfce edition released

few ubuntu articles

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 8.04 Review

  • Ubuntu Mobile On My Desktop!
  • Ubuntu: A Future Social OS?
  • Wubi: Peaceful Coexistence between Vista and Ubuntu “Hardy Heron”
  • Ubuntu: Christians, Muslims and Computers

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Configuring Linux Terminal to Work as a Transparent Wallpaper

  • GRUB vs. the Inodes: Who Needs a Bootable System, Anyway?
  • RPMs - The HOWTO Short Story
  • Understanding XML in 10 seconds or less
  • Howto: Install GRUB on a Floppy
  • How-to Install Cairo-Dock
  • KDE4: Getting GTK apps to look just right
  • How To Install Elisa Media Center
  • Resize Windows XP Partition with VMWare
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More in Tux Machines

25 things to love about Linux

Today marks 25 years of Linux, the most successful software ever. At LinuxCon this week, Jim Zemlin of the Linux Foundation spoke words of admiration, praise, and excitement from the keynote stage, saying "Linux at 25 is a big thing" and "You can better yourself while bettering others at the same time." To celebrate, we asked our readers what they love about Linux and rounded up 25 of their responses. Dive into the Linux love! Read more

GNU/FSF

Linux and Graphics

  • ContainerCon Vendors Offer Flexible Solutions for Managing All Your New Micro-VMs
    As you might expect, this week's LinuxCon and ContainerCon 2016, held in Toronto, is heavy on the benefits and pitfalls of deploying containers, but several vendors aim to come to the rescue with flexible tools to manage it all. Take Datadog, a New York-based company that offers scalable monitoring of your containerized infrastructure—and just about everything else—from a single interface. This is an off-premise, cloud-based tool that can monitor tens of thousands of your hosts and integrate with stuff you already know, like AWS, Cassandra, Docker, Kubernetes, Postgre and 150 other tools.
  • Happy Birthday Linux
    Linux turns 25 today. That's four years older than Linus was when he invented it. That means Linus has spent more of his life with Linux than he did without it
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.9 To Bring Virtual Display Support, Improved GPU Reset
    The first pull request has been submitted of new Radeon and AMDGPU DRM driver updates to be queued in DRM-Next for landing with the Linux 4.9 kernel. To look forward to Linux 4.9 even though Linux 4.8 is still weeks from being released is PowerPlay support for Iceland GPUs, improved GPU reset, UVD and VCE power-gating for Carrizo and Stoney, support for pre-initialized vRAM buffers, TTM clean-ups, virtual display support, and other low-level changes. Many bug fixes also present. The AMDGPU virtual display support is useful and we have been looking forward to it. GPU reset improvements are also welcome for better recovery when the GPU becomes hung. As is the case lately, most of these changes are focused around the newer AMDGPU DRM driver over the mature Radeon DRM code.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 Comes For Intel Haswell On Mesa
    For those running Intel Haswell processors, hope is not lost in seeing new versions of OpenGL extensions with the Intel Mesa driver.

Security News

  • Wednesday's security updates
  • This Android botnet relies on Twitter for its commands
  • Android Security Flaw Exposes 1.4B Devices [Ed: Alternative headline is, "Android is very popular, it has billions of users. And yes, security ain’t perfect." When did the press ever publish a headline like, "Windows flaw leaves 2 billion PCs susceptible for remote takeover?" (happens a lot)]
  • Wildfire ransomware code cracked: Victims can now unlock encrypted files for free
    Victims of the Wildfire ransomware can get their encrypted files back without paying hackers for the privilege, after the No More Ransom initiative released a free decryption tool. No More Ransom runs a web portal that provides keys for unlocking files encrypted by various strains of ransomware, including Shade, Coinvault, Rannoh, Rakhn and, most recently, Wildfire. Aimed at helping ransomware victims retrieve their data, No More Ransom is a collaborative project between Europol, the Dutch National Police, Intel Security, and Kaspersky Lab. Wildfire victims are served with a ransom note demanding payment of 1.5 Bitcoins -- the cryptocurrency favored by cybercriminals -- in exchange for unlocking the encrypted files. However, cybersecurity researchers from McAfee Labs, part of Intel Security, point out that the hackers behind Wildfire are open to negotiation, often accepting 0.5 Bitcoins as a payment. Most victims of the ransomware are located in the Netherlands and Belgium, with the malicious software spread through phishing emails aimed at Dutch speakers. The email claims to be from a transport company and suggests that the target has missed a parcel delivery -- encouraging them to fill in a form to rearrange delivery for another date. It's this form which drops Wildfire ransomware onto the victim's system and locks it down.