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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 29 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Why Chromebook Sales Are Surging in Schools, Enterprises Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 9:09am
Story Unity 8 and Mir Updates Promoted by Ubuntu Developers Rianne Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 9:05am
Story Fedora 21 Has Been Delayed By Three Weeks Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 8:52am
Story Elections Results for Summer 2014 FESCo Special Election Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 8:46am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 8:28am
Story The ARM Arc Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 5:51am
Story Microsoft imitates Ubuntu, will create one Windows to run on all screens Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 5:38am
Story Lessons from an open source entrepreneur Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 5:30am
Story diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 4:50am
Story Clone Attack, Tails Rebased, and Banana Pi? Roy Schestowitz 24/07/2014 - 4:40am

PCLinuxOS-N1PTT-TR6 Finally Released

Filed under
PCLOS

pclinuxos.com: The Ripper Gang is pleased to announce the first public beta ISO release of what will ultimately become PCLinuxOS 2009. This beta iso features kernel 2.6.26.8.tex3, KDE 3.5.10, Open Office 3.0, and Firefox 3.0.5.

10 obscure Linux applications you need to try

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: With thousands of Linux tools out there, it stands to reason that some of the very best ones might get lost in the crowd. Jack Wallen introduces some excellent apps that more admins should know about.

Fatal Windows 7 Flaw Will Bolster Linux Netbooks

Filed under
Microsoft

workswithu.com: I think Microsoft has done a reasonably good job developing Windows 7. Most early buzz about the operating system was positive. But when it comes to running Windows 7 on netbooks, Microsoft has made a fatal design decision that will open the door for more Linux netbooks.

You Get What You Pay For

Filed under
OSS

linuxtoday.com: "You get what you pay for" is a common FUDphrase used to discredit Linux and FOSS, because so much of it is available free of cost. Which scares the purveyors of overpriced crapware, who would rather walk barefoot through broken glass and burning dung than write software that customers actually feel happy paying for.

Embracing Change: The Linux Paradigm

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: It's time to embrace change in the IT world. Linux, for many, is ushering in a new age of reason. But why the sudden move this direction? Is it a trendy move or a paradigm shift?

KDE 4 is not user ready

Filed under
KDE

kdedevelopers.org: It is often said that many open-source-software is not enterprise-ready. But in order to be enterprise-ready, software must first be user-ready. I want to give you a feeling what I mean.

Why Does Everyone Heart Boxee?

Filed under
Software

gigaom.com: The buzz has been building for Boxee lately. Mainstream news outlets like The New York Times, BusinessWeek and NPR are getting hip to the little open-source media center that could quite possibly change the way you experience TV.

Linux Around the World

Filed under
Linux

linuxfoundation.org: One of the coolest things about the Internet for me personally is that it lets you travel the world, yet can always bring you home in an instant. This may sound corny, but it never fails to amaze me, especially when I am far from home, as I am now.

Tiny Silent Linux PC Gets Updated

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

automatedhome.co.uk: In 2007 we ran a story on the tiny linux PC The Linutop. Now the diminutive system has hit version 2.4 and with it an official launch in the UK. The pint-sized, open source Linux PC is designed to run silently and is highly energy efficient at just 8 watts.

Damn Small indeed

Filed under
Linux

tangledbits.blogspot: Over the last several weeks I have been cleaning out my computer room. While digging through paperwork I found a pen that someone had given to me. The pen contained a 64MB USB drive. I set the pen off to the side. "Great," I thought, "now I can try to put Linux on there."

Xfce creator talks Linux, Moblin, netbooks and open-source

Filed under
Interviews

slashgear.com: SlashGear caught up with Xfce creator Olivier Fourdan, whose desktop environment has not only been selected by Intel for Moblin but can be found on many existing Linux netbooks, and talked Intel, Moblin, the future for netbooks and what challenges he sees for open-source newcomer Android.

More about Linux games - Part 5

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: This time of season again: Linux gaming. Today, I will show you several more interesting titles that you may want to run on your Linux desktop.

Canonical's Survey Results Give Insight to Server Market Far Beyond Ubuntu

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com/blog: After taking a closer look at the survey, I'd recommend it to anyone interested in current server technologies, or where the server market is headed -- even if Ubuntu Server isn't part of the equation.

RPM 4.6.0 released

Filed under
Software

heise-online.co.uk: Nine months after the last release, the RPM.org developers have announced RPM 4.6.0, a new version of the RPM Package Manager, one of the main packaging formats for many Linux distributions and part of the Linux Standard Base (LSB).

Woah, What?!?!

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: The Phoronix headline was probably a little confusing, Compiz Fusion as a project is not being dropped, we’re here to stay, however considering that the same two leaders are in charge of both Compiz and Compiz Fusion, we have decided to merge the two projects.

Ubuntu shines where OS X fails

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntuproductivity.com: Coming from a lifetime as a Mac user you can imagine that I am rather trusting of the OS, especially as a creative tool. The first catastrophe was using Leopard server.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • How To Improve The Linux System’s Security Using Firejail
    As you already know, Linux kernel is secure by default. But, it doesn’t mean that the softwares on the Linux system are completely secure. Say for example, there is a possibility that any add-ons on your web browser may cause some serious security issues. While doing financial transactions over internet, some key logger may be active in browser which you are not aware of. Even though, we can’t completely give the bullet-proof security to our Linux box, we still can add an extra pinch of security using an application called Firejail. It is a security utility which can sandbox any such application and let it to run in a controlled environment. To put this simply, Firejail is a SUID (Set owner User ID up on execution) program that reduces the risk of security breaches by restricting the running environment of untrusted applications.
  • “Httpd and Relayd Mastery” off to copyedit
  • Kalyna Block Cipher

Containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs

  • Setting the Record Straight: containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs
    I’m tired of having the same conversation over and over again with people so I figured I would put it into a blog post. Many people ask me if I have tried or what I think of Solaris Zones / BSD Jails. The answer is simply: I have tried them and I definitely like them. The conversation then heads towards them telling me how Zones and Jails are far superior to containers and that I should basically just give up with Linux containers and use VMs. Which to be honest is a bit forward to someone who has spent a large portion of her career working with containers and trying to make containers more secure. Here is what I tell them:
  • [Old] Hadoop Has Failed Us, Tech Experts Say

    The Hadoop community has so far failed to account for the poor performance and high complexity of Hadoop, Johnson says. “The Hadoop ecosystem is still basically in the hands of a small number of experts,” he says. “If you have that power and you’ve learned know how to use these tools and you’re programmer, then this thing is super powerful. But there aren’t a lot of those people. I’ve read all these things how we need another million data scientists in the world, which I think means our tools aren’t very good.”

Wine and Games

  • [Wine] Packaging changes
    Today we want to announce some important changes regarding the Wine Staging packages provided at repos.wine-staging.com and dl.winehq.org. We completely reworked our build system to make the packages available sooner after a release and also added some new features, like downloading old packages for Debian / Ubuntu. The complete list of changes can be found in the announcement email on the Wine mailing list.
  • Planescape: Torment Enhanced Edition Announced for PC, Mac, Linux, and Mobile
  • Podcast #6 with Ethan Lee, Porter on Fez, Transistor
    Have you ever played Fez on Linux ? Transistor ? Speed Runners ? Shenzen I/O ? Bastion ? or more recently, Owlboy ? Well if you have, you have benefited from the work of Flibitijibibo who is directly responsible for the port of such titles to your platform.

Microsoft EEE and Openwashing