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Wednesday, 29 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Flipping the Linux switch: The anti-virus question

Filed under
Linux

downloadsquad.com: We were at a major electronics retailer a few days ago, gazing lovingly at the little ASUS Eee. We were not alone. They asked why the user interface wasn't as familiar as their home machine. "Linux," said the salesman. (He was ever so helpful.) The next question, "Does it come with anti-virus?"

KDE Utils: Falling in love all over again

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: Today we're going to look at the little tools in KDE4, or at least some of them. There are far too many to be able to cover in one blog entry, and so I've decided to cover a few of the ones that I personally use and which have had visible improvements over their KDE3 counterparts.

LiMo Foundation touts real mobile Linux

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: The LiMo foundation delivered a clear snub to Google's Android this week as it announced 18 handsets running its version of Linux at Mobile World Congress this week.

Free/Open-source IRC/IM Software

Filed under
Software

junauza.blogspot: Internet Relay Chat (IRC) is a form of real-time Internet chat or synchronous conferencing. Instant Messaging (IM) is a form of real-time communication between two or more people based on typed text over a network. I have here a long list of excellent free/open-source IRC and IM clients that you may want to try out.

Wx/Net - Weather monitoring for penguins

Filed under
Software

raiden's realm: In my periodical wanderings around the net, I sometimes stumble onto a number of rather unique and interesting applications. Wx/Net is one of them. The majority of people out there might not think that an open source application designed to interface with weather monitoring stations is all that exciting.

Where is Ubuntu headed, and why are Linux users upset?

Filed under
Ubuntu

ibeentoubuntu.blogspot: Seven years ago, I knew what every process running on my computer was. I could -- with confidence -- tell users exactly how to solve a problem which was occurring. That's not really true anymore. The changes that are happening upset a fair number of older users, but I think that even the ancient among us can respect what's being accomplished.

Doom and Gloom! Oh My! Linux Kernal in Trouble?

Filed under
Linux

tmgstudio.com: Nothing like a little doom and gloom to start the morning! The folks over at PC World think the sky is falling. "They could be exploited by malicious, *local* users to cause denial of service attacks, disclose potentially sensitive information or gain “root” privileges." Ooh, scary!

some shorts

Filed under
News
  • Opera accuses Mozilla of irresponsible disclosure

  • Kiba-Dock with AIGLX in KDE + Gentoo
  • AWN Manager - Applet Preferences gets an Overhaul
  • ATI R700 Series Gain ALSA HDMI Audio

People of openSUSE: Michael Meeks

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

news.opensuse: GNOME and full time OpenOffice.org developer Michael Meeks was invited by ‘People of openSUSE’ to an interview, and here are his answers! Just in case, if you will be in FOSDEM 2008 do not miss the opportunity to meet him there, and attend his talk in the openSUSE DevRoom.

Commercial Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

thetechandcents: I just read a post by Bruce Byfield, where he raises an interesting question: after the fact that Canonical will try and offer commercial software from a specific repository, would anyone use it? And if not, could it alienate other users of Ubuntu from using the distribution at all?

California firm buys Utah-based Linux

sltrib.com: A Silicon Valley company has bought the assets of Utah supercomputer maker Linux Networx Inc. for an undisclosed amount of stock.

Discover the possibilities of the /proc folder

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: The /proc directory is a strange beast. It doesn't really exist, yet you can explore it. Its zero-length files are neither binary nor text, yet you can examine and display them. By studying the /proc directory, you can learn how Linux commands work, and you can even do some administrative tasks.

Quick Review: Firefox 3 Beta 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

maketecheasier.com: Mozilla has released the latest beta of Firefox 3 for testers and early adopters. This latest beta includes many useful features and improved user interface.

How To Configure Remote Access To Your Ubuntu Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide explains how you can enable a remote desktop on an Ubuntu desktop so that you can access and control it remotely.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Eight Distros a Week: Linux Mint Daryna 4.0 Xfce

  • Save your command for later execution
  • GNOME Scaling Problem
  • Developers warned over OOXML patent risk
  • Red Hat, Hyperic start open-source project
  • Another OpenSUSE 10.3 Kernel Upgrade
  • Open Season Episode 11
  • Opera 9.26 - coming soon!
  • Major Linux security glitch lets hackers in at Claranet
  • Ubuntu, Red Hat and Novell SUSE Linux jockey for position
  • Jono Bacon: Quickies
  • Open JDK and Ubuntu: Bringing Java to Linux - Part 1 (video)

some more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto: Screen

  • Resizing the slides in OpenOffice Impress Handouts
  • Linux Tip No. 17: Enable/Disable interface
  • Gnome Panel Font Color Part Deux
  • How to Install Vector Linux 5.9 Gold
  • How to use shared object rules in Snort
  • Installing and Configuring GNUMP3d, The Streaming MP3/OGG Server
  • A Shortcut for Creating Shortcuts
  • How to Gain Root Access
  • Setting up mod_rewrite in Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibon
  • Quick’n'dirty undelete pictures from memory card howto
  • Increase PHP memory limit

Open source - and an open mind

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: When Con Zymaris started a little company offering free software services 17 years ago - when the concept of open source did not exist - it is unlikely that he thought he would be around in 2008, doing the same business.

The scaling problem and open source

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: Most trends in the open source market come down to one word. Scaling.

The Demise Of Commercial Open Source

Filed under
OSS

informationweek.com/blog: Steve Goodman, co-founder and CEO of network management startup PacketTrap Networks, is predicting that commercial open source companies are doomed to fail.

Open for the Future

Filed under
OSS

military-information-technology: Programs such as the Army’s Future Combat Systems and organizations such as the Defense Information Systems Agency and the Defense Intelligence Agency are using open technologies using non-proprietary software.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: The Latest

  • Container technologies in Fedora: systemd-nspawn
    Welcome to the “Container technologies in Fedora” series! This is the first article in a series of articles that will explain how you can use the various container technologies available in Fedora. This first article will deal with systemd-nspawn.
  • Fedora 24 upgrade
    Fedora 24 was released last week, so of course I had to upgrade my machines. As has become the norm, there weren’t any serious issues, but I hit a few annoyances this time around. The first was due to packages in the RPMFusion repos not being signed. This isn’t Fedora’s fault, as RPMFusion is a completely separate project. And it was temporary: by the time I upgraded my laptop on Sunday night, the packages had all been signed.
  • Fedora Flock 2016
    I’ve been working on a shirt design for this year’s Fedora Flock in Krakow, Poland and figured that I’d share what I’ve put together! I’m also including some of my earlier attempts at the design as well to show my thought process as well. Ps. for those who may not be familiar with landmarks and iconic images of Krakow (and yes, I too am one of you too… much research was needed!) here’s a list of some of the imagery that I tied to incorporate in the designs.
  • A F24 user story
    Honestly, nothing from the features in the announcement of the Fedora 24 release didn't manage to excite me intro upgrading my desktop from an old, out-of-support Fedora. It's main task is to edit digital photography and for some years a Linux solution is decent at it.
  • PHP version 7.0 in Fedora 25
    FESCO have approved, for Fedora 25 the upgrade from PHP 5.6 to PHP 7.0.
  • How to install Nvidia Drivers in Fedora 24
  • Zodbot… upgraded
    We have upgraded our beloved evil super villain IRC bot on freenode from an old version of supybot-gribble to a new shiny version of limnoria ( https://github.com/ProgVal/Limnoria ). This doesn’t change much in the interface, but it does mean we are using something that is maintained and gets updates and is a good deal more secure. If you notice problems please do let us know with a Fedora Infrastructure ticket.
  • GSoC - Journey So Far ( Badges, Milestones and more..)
    2 days ago, I woke up to a mail from Google saying that I passed the mid term evaluations of GSoC and could continue working towards my final evaluation. "What a wonderful way to kick start a day, I thought".

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

Education and Open Access

  • Open access and Brexit
    The UK research community’s response to the recent referendum – in which a majority of 52% voted for the UK to leave the European Union (or “Brexit”) – has been one of horror and disbelief. This is no surprise, not least because Brexit would have a serious impact on research funding in the UK. Nature reports that UK universities currently get around 16% of their research funding from the EU, and that the UK currently hosts more EU-funded holders of ERC grants than any other member state. Elsewhere, Digital Science has estimated that the UK could lose £1 billion in science funding if the UK government does not make up the shortfall in EU-linked research funds.
  • Another View: Nonprofit groups offer lesson in cutting college textbook costs
    Using online, open-source materials instead of expensive printed books eases the burden on students. By The Washington Post. Share. facebook · tweet · email. print Comment.
  • Lanier Tech joins group helping community college students succeed
  • Another View: Colleges should go open source to cut textbook costs
    The following editorial appeared in The Washington Post: Every year, college students shell out thousands of dollars for tuition. Then they face an additional cost: textbooks.